talk

Joni Low The malleability of identity then and now
Thursday, March 31, 7 PM

Curated by Jonah Gray

Or Gallery is pleased to present a talk by independent curator Joni Low for the final instalment of our Curating the Self lecture series.

Low will share her interests in the metaphor of the archive, the ways in which material accumulations perform identities and selves, and the virtual commons as a space of expressive possibility. Drawing on the idea of the archive as an extension of the self, she will discuss past curatorial projects including Fountain: the source or origin of anything, a public art and web project by Laiwan, and Hank Bull: Connexion, an exhibition of collected material traces of life lived as art, currently touring across Canada. She will also screen examples from 1970s performance and video art – including Kate Craig’s Flying Leopard and Norman Cohn’s How We Lived – reflecting on artistic strategies around the malleability of identity then, the performance of selves in our networked digital now, and the shaping of curatorial frameworks around what artists choose to reveal and conceal.


Following this lecture, Or Gallery will host a reading group focused on an essay selected by Low from Hito Steyerl’s Wretched of the Screen (Sternberg Press, 2012). The reading group will take place at the Or on Wednesday April 6 at 7PM. Space is limited so please RSVP .

Joni Low is an independent curator and writer committed to building conversations around interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspectives. Recent exhibitions include Hank Bull: Connexion (2015-2017, Charlottetown, Montréal, Halifax and Burnaby), Fountain: the source or origin of anything, a public artwork by Laiwan (2014, The Wall: CBC Plaza) and Idle Wild: DRIL art collective (2012, Café for Contemporary Art). She has written for catalogues and publications including Canadian Art, C Magazine, The Capilano Review, Fillip, and Yishu: Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art. A member of Other Sights for Artists’ Projects and the Doryphore Independent Curators’ Society, Low has held positions at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Long March Space Beijing, and Centre A.

Curating the Self is a lecture series that explores the construction of identity in relation to the discipline of curating as well as the many forms of cultural assemblage that have lately begun to appropriate and adapt curatorial strategies for their own purposes.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

Wood Land School Critical Anthology
Duane Linklater, cheyenne turions, Amy Kazymerchyk, Candice Hopkins, Tanya Lukin Linklater, Liz Park, Postcommodity, Raymond Boisjoly, David Garneau, Walter Scott
March 19 — April 23, 2016

An exhibition of documentation from the Wood Land School Critical Anthology symposium (March 11-13, 2016)

The weekend of talks brought together artists and curators to address the lack of critical writing on the work of contemporary Indigenous artists. The presentation of papers-in-progress by all the participants will work to advance the discourse around Indigenous contemporary art practices and will ultimately cohere into an anthology co-published by Or Gallery and SFU Galleries at the end of 2016.

Wood Land School is an ongoing project with no fixed location and a shifting form. It seeks critical engagement within the realms of representation, film, contemporary art, land, and politics on Turtle Island and beyond. Each iteration of Wood Land School carries forth with it a commitment to address the lack of structural inclusion, both historically and in the now, in a multiplicity of institutional spaces. It is a conceptual and physical space for Indigenous people, with Indigenous people deciding its directions, structures and functions. An important aspect of Wood Land School is the inclusion of non-Indigenous people, so as not to exclude anyone interested in engaging with the complexities of the aforementioned issues. Wood Land School started in 2011 with a small exhibition of works, selected by Duane Linklater, in a studio space located above a store on the Nipissing First Nations in Ontario. Since then it has taken many forms such as residencies, seminars, film screenings and discursive happenings, in places such as The Banff Center for the Arts, Art Metropole, and Simon Fraser University.

Duane Linklater
cheyanne turions – From Where Do You Speak?: Locating the Possibility of Decolonization in Krista Belle Stewart’s Seraphine Seraphine
Raymond Boisjoly, Questions without answers: needs, justifications, explanations, meaning
Amy Kazymerchyk – Bush Gallery
David Garneau – Can I Get a Witness?: Indigenous, Art, Criticism
Postcommodity – Art is Deaf
Walter Scott – Wendy’s Revenge (with Amy Kazymerchyk)
Candice Hopkins – Outside the margins and inside the institution
Tanya Lukin Linklater – A Glossary of Insistence
Liz Park – Exhibitions about Exhibitions, Criticism of Criticism
Closing remarks

Editor:

Duane Linklater is Omaskêko Cree, from Moose Cree First Nation in Northern Ontario, and is currently based in North Bay, Ontario. He was educated at the University of Alberta, receiving a Bachelor of Native Studies and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Duane attended the Milton Avery Graduate School of Arts at Bard College in upstate New York, completing his Master of Fine Arts in Film and Video. Duane produces a range of work including video and film installations, photography, sculptural objects, and often works within the contexts of cooperative and collaborative gestures. He has exhibited and screened his work nationally and internationally at the Vancouver Art Gallery; Family Business Gallery in New York City; Te Tuhi Centre for Arts, Auckland, New Zealand; City Arts Centre in Edinburgh Scotland; and at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, Philadelphia. His collaborative film project with Brian Jungen, Modest Livelihood, was originally presented at the Walter Phillips Gallery at The Banff Centre as a part of dOCUMENTA (13) with subsequent exhibitions of this work at the Logan Centre Gallery at the University of Chicago, Catriona Jeffries Gallery in Vancouver and the Art Gallery of Ontario. Duane was also the recipient of the 2013 Sobey Art Award, an annual prize given to an artist under 40. Duane is currently represented by Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver.

Writers:

Raymond Boisjoly is an artist of Haida and Québécois descent, living and working in Vancouver. Boisjoly’s practice operates as active speculation, engaging issues of aboriginality, language as cultural practice and the experiential aspects of materiality. His process is situated in proximity to photography, and concerns the nature of technology and its transmission as a means to index and understand cultural transformation. Boisjoly has presented work in solo and group exhibitions at institutions including the Senter for Nordlige Folk, Manndalen; Simon Fraser University Gallery, Vancouver; Esker Foundation, Calgary; Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver; the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto; and Western Bridge, Seattle.

David Garneau (Métis) is Associate Professor of Visual Arts at the University of Regina, Saskatchewan. His practice includes painting, drawing, performance art, video, curation, and critical writing. He is interested in visual and tactile expressions of contemporary Indigenous identities and moments of friction between nature and culture, materialism and metaphysics. Garneau recently co-curated (with Michelle LaVallee) Moving Forward, Never Forgetting, an exhibition concerning the legacies of Indian Residential Schools, other forms of aggressive assimilation, and (re)conciliation. He has written numerous catalogue essays and reviews and has recently given talks in Australia, the United States and Canada. He is currently working on curatorial projects in Sydney and New York, and is part of a five-year, SSHRC funded, curatorial research project, “Creative Conciliation.”

Candice Hopkins is a Curatorial Advisor for dOCUMENTA 14. She has held curatorial positions at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, National Gallery of Canada, the Western Front and the Walter Phillips Gallery. Hopkins’ writings on history, art, and vernacular architecture are published by MIT Press, BlackDog Publishing, Revolver, New York University, Fillip, and the National Museum of the American Indian, among others. She has lectured widely including a keynote presentation with Hetti Perkins on the “sovereign imagination” for dOCUMENTA (13). She is co-curator of the exhibitions Close Encounters: The Next 500 Years; Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art; and the 2014 SITE Santa Fe Biennial exhibition Unsettled Landscapes. Hopkins has co-edited the books Recipes for an Encounter (Western Front) and Jimmie Durham: The Second Particle Wave Theory (Walter Phillips Gallery Editions and Art Editions North).

Amy Kazymerchyk is the curator of SFU Galleries’ Audain Gallery. She has programmed for VIVOMedia Arts Centre, the Signal + Noise Media Arts Festival, Vancouver Queer Film Festival and DIMCinema at The Cinematheque. Amy has contributed to Artist-Run Culture in Vancouver in numerous capacities and continues to support both institutional and non-institutional artist run initiatives and projects.

Liz Park is a curator and writer currently based in Pittsburgh as Associate Curator of Carnegie International 2018. She has curated exhibitions at the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, the Kitchen in New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia, and Seoul Art Space_Geumcheon in Seoul. Her writing has been published by Afterimage, Afterall Online, ArtAsiaPacific, Performa Magazine, Fillip, MOMUS, Pluto Press, and Ryerson University Press among others. In 2011–2012 Park was Helena Rubinstein Fellow in the Curatorial Program at the Whitney Museum’s Independent Study Program, and in 2013-2015 she was Whitney-Lauder Curatorial Fellow at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia. The topics of her curatorial research and writing include the politics of visibility, representation of violence, ghosts, and non-western art in the global context of contemporary art.

Tanya Lukin Linklater’s performance collaborations, videos, photographs and installations have been exhibited at EFA Project Space, NYC; Museum of Contemporary Art Santiago, Chilé; SBC Gallery, Montreal; Western Front, Vancouver; Urban Shaman, Winnipeg; Images Festival + Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Toronto; grunt gallery, Vancouver; Nuit Blanche, Winnipeg; Museum of Contemporary Native Art, Santa Fe; Culver Center for the Arts, California; People of Good Will Project, Guelph; and elsewhere. She is compelled by the interstices of visual art and poetry, pedagogy, indigenous languages, portrayals of women and children in film, and the body. In 2016, she will present performances at Remai Modern, Saskatoon; Centre Phi + DHC / Art, Montreal; and the Belkin Gallery/UBC, Vancouver; and install new work at Art Gallery of Alberta in a two-person exhibition with Duane Linklater. Her poetry and essays have been published by C Magazine, Access Gallery, BlackFlash Magazine, Yellow Medicine Review, Taos International Journal of Poetry and Art, Drunken Boat, Ice Floe, Western Front Gallery, and McLaren Art Centre. Tanya studied at University of Alberta (M.Ed.) and Stanford University (A.B. Honours) where she received the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship and the Louis Sudler Prize for Creative and Performing Arts. She is currently a graduate student in Cultural Studies at Queen’s University. She was awarded the Chalmers Professional Development Grant in 2010 and the K.M. Hunter Artist Award in Literature in 2013. She originates from southern Alaska and is based in northern Ontario, Canada.

Postcommodity is an interdisciplinary arts collective comprised of Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martínez, Kade L. Twist and Nathan Young. Postcommodity’s art functions as a shared Indigenous lens and voice to engage the assaultive manifestations of the global market and its supporting institutions, public perceptions, beliefs, and individual actions that comprise the ever-expanding, multinational, multiracial and multiethnic colonizing force that is defining the 21st Century through ever increasing velocities and complex forms of violence. Postcommodity works to forge new metaphors capable of rationalizing our shared experiences within this increasingly challenging contemporary environment; promote a constructive discourse that challenges the social, political and economic processes that are destabilizing communities and geographies; and connect Indigenous narratives of cultural self-determination with the broader public sphere. Postcommodity are the recipients of grants from the Telluride Institute (2007), American Composers Forum (2008), Arizona Commission on the Arts (2009), Elly Kay Fund (2010), Joan Mitchell Foundation (2010), Creative Capital (2012), Art Matters (2013), and the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (2014). In 2011 the collective’s work was featured in Close Encounters, an international Indigenous exhibition exhibited in multiple venues throughout the city of Winnipeg; Contour, the 5th Biennial of the Moving Image in Mechelen, Belgium; Nuit Blanche, Toronto; Half Life: Patterns of Change, Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico; The Night is Filled With the Harmonics of Suburban Dreams, Lawrence Art Center, Lawrence, Kansas; Here, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Museum; 18th Biennale of Sydney in Sydney, Australia; Adelaide International in Adelaide, Australia; and Time Lapse, Site Santa Fe, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In 2013, Postcommodity exhibited their work at the Headlands Center for the Arts, and also opened their art space, Spirit Abuse, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In 2015, Postcommodity exhibited at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art and staged a site-specific 2-mile long land installation at the US/Mexican border near Douglas, Arizona.

Walter Scott is a Kahnawake-born, Montreal/Toronto based artist working in writing, illustration, performance and sculpture. His ongoing comic book series, Wendy, follows a young woman living in an urban centre whose dreams of contemporary art stardom are perpetually derailed. Recent exhibitions include Habitual Present, 8-11, Toronto; Pre-Existing Work, Macaulay and Co. Fine Art, Vancouver; and Stopping the Sun In Its Course at Francois Ghebaly, Los Angeles. In 2014 he was Artist-in-Residence at the Koganecho Bazaar in Yokohama.

cheyanne turions is an independent curator and writer who holds a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy from the University of British Columbia, and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in Visual Studies from the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design at the University of Toronto. From the farmlands of Treaty 8, she is of settler and Indigenous ancestry. Her work approaches the space of exhibition as alive: the gallery is a space of dialogue where artists, curators and publics can reflect on and experiment with ways of seeing and being in relation. Recently she curated Talking Back, Otherwise, a year-long exhibition at the Jackman Humanities Institute. Forthcoming writing projects include contributions to MAWA’s Desire/Change: Contemporary Canadian Feminist Art; Johanna Householder and Tanya Mars’s More Caught in the Act: An Anthology of Performance Art by Canadian Women; and Meryl McMaster’s Confluence. Her exhibition Other Electricities was presented the award for Innovation in a Collections-based Exhibition by the Ontario Association of Art Galleries in 2014. In 2015 she received the inaugural Reesa Greenberg Curatorial Studies Award and the Hnatyshyn Foundation’s Emerging Curator of Contemporary Canadian Art Award. She sits on the Board of Directors for Kunstverein Toronto, the Editorial Advisory Committee for C Magazine and the Advisory Board for the Art Museum at the University of Toronto. She is the director of No Reading After the Internet (Toronto).

SFU Galleries | Simon Fraser University

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



symposium

Wood Land School: Critical Anthology
Duane Linklater, cheyanne turions, Amy Kazymerchyk, Candice Hopkins, Tanya Lukin Linklater, Liz Park, Postcommodity, Raymond Boisjoly, David Garneau, Walter Scott
March 11 — March 13, 2016

A symposium on directions in Indigenous contemporary art

Or Gallery, 555 Hamilton Street, Vancouver
Co-presented by Or Gallery and SFU Galleries

This weekend of talks brings together artists and curators to address the lack of critical writing on the work of contemporary Indigenous artists. The presentation of papers-in-progress by all the participants will work to advance the discourse around Indigenous contemporary art practices and will ultimately cohere into an anthology co-published by Or Gallery and SFU Galleries at the end of 2016.

Wood Land School is an ongoing project with no fixed location and a shifting form. It seeks critical engagement within the realms of representation, film, contemporary art, land, and politics on Turtle Island and beyond. Each iteration of Wood Land School carries forth with it a commitment to address the lack of structural inclusion, both historically and in the now, in a multiplicity of institutional spaces. It is a conceptual and physical space for Indigenous people, with Indigenous people deciding its directions, structures and functions. An important aspect of Wood Land School is the inclusion of non-Indigenous people, so as not to exclude anyone interested in engaging with the complexities of the aforementioned issues. Wood Land School started in 2011 with a small exhibition of works, selected by Duane Linklater, in a studio space located above a store on the Nipissing First Nations in Ontario. Since then it has taken many forms such as residencies, seminars, film screenings and discursive happenings, in places such as The Banff Center for the Arts, Art Metropole, and Simon Fraser University.

Friday, March 11, 2016
6:00-7:30PM Duane Linklater
Saturday, March 12, 2016
10:00AM cheyanne turions – From Where Do You Speak?: Locating the Possibility of Decolonization in Krista Belle Stewart’s Seraphine Seraphine
11:00AM Raymond Boisjoly, Questions without answers: needs, justifications, explanations, meaning
12:00PM Lunch break
1:00PM Amy Kazymerchyk – Bush Gallery
2:00PM David Garneau – Can I Get a Witness?: Indigenous, Art, Criticism
3:00PM Postcommodity – Art is Deaf
Sunday, March 13, 2016
10:00AM Walter Scott – Wendy’s Revenge
11:00AM Candice Hopkins – Outside the margins and inside the institution
12:00PM Lunch break
1:00PM Tanya Lukin Linklater – A Glossary of Insistence
2:00PM Liz Park – Exhibitions about Exhibitions, Criticism of Criticism
3:00PM Closing remarks

Editor:

Duane Linklater is Omaskêko Cree, from Moose Cree First Nation in Northern Ontario, and is currently based in North Bay, Ontario. He was educated at the University of Alberta, receiving a Bachelor of Native Studies and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Duane attended the Milton Avery Graduate School of Arts at Bard College in upstate New York, completing his Master of Fine Arts in Film and Video. Duane produces a range of work including video and film installations, photography, sculptural objects, and often works within the contexts of cooperative and collaborative gestures. He has exhibited and screened his work nationally and internationally at the Vancouver Art Gallery; Family Business Gallery in New York City; Te Tuhi Centre for Arts, Auckland, New Zealand; City Arts Centre in Edinburgh Scotland; and at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, Philadelphia. His collaborative film project with Brian Jungen, Modest Livelihood, was originally presented at the Walter Phillips Gallery at The Banff Centre as a part of dOCUMENTA (13) with subsequent exhibitions of this work at the Logan Centre Gallery at the University of Chicago, Catriona Jeffries Gallery in Vancouver and the Art Gallery of Ontario. Duane was also the recipient of the 2013 Sobey Art Award, an annual prize given to an artist under 40. Duane is currently represented by Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver.

Writers:

Raymond Boisjoly is an artist of Haida and Québécois descent, living and working in Vancouver. Boisjoly’s practice operates as active speculation, engaging issues of aboriginality, language as cultural practice and the experiential aspects of materiality. His process is situated in proximity to photography, and concerns the nature of technology and its transmission as a means to index and understand cultural transformation. Boisjoly has presented work in solo and group exhibitions at institutions including the Senter for Nordlige Folk, Manndalen; Simon Fraser University Gallery, Vancouver; Esker Foundation, Calgary; Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver; the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto; and Western Bridge, Seattle.

David Garneau (Métis) is Associate Professor of Visual Arts at the University of Regina, Saskatchewan. His practice includes painting, drawing, performance art, video, curation, and critical writing. He is interested in visual and tactile expressions of contemporary Indigenous identities and moments of friction between nature and culture, materialism and metaphysics. Garneau recently co-curated (with Michelle LaVallee) Moving Forward, Never Forgetting, an exhibition concerning the legacies of Indian Residential Schools, other forms of aggressive assimilation, and (re)conciliation. He has written numerous catalogue essays and reviews and has recently given talks in Australia, the United States and Canada. He is currently working on curatorial projects in Sydney and New York, and is part of a five-year, SSHRC funded, curatorial research project, “Creative Conciliation.”

Candice Hopkins is a Curatorial Advisor for dOCUMENTA 14. She has held curatorial positions at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, National Gallery of Canada, the Western Front and the Walter Phillips Gallery. Hopkins’ writings on history, art, and vernacular architecture are published by MIT Press, BlackDog Publishing, Revolver, New York University, Fillip, and the National Museum of the American Indian, among others. She has lectured widely including a keynote presentation with Hetti Perkins on the “sovereign imagination” for dOCUMENTA (13). She is co-curator of the exhibitions Close Encounters: The Next 500 Years; Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art; and the 2014 SITE Santa Fe Biennial exhibition Unsettled Landscapes. Hopkins has co-edited the books Recipes for an Encounter (Western Front) and Jimmie Durham: The Second Particle Wave Theory (Walter Phillips Gallery Editions and Art Editions North).

Amy Kazymerchyk is the curator of SFU Galleries’ Audain Gallery. She has programmed for VIVOMedia Arts Centre, the Signal + Noise Media Arts Festival, Vancouver Queer Film Festival and DIMCinema at The Cinematheque. Amy has contributed to Artist-Run Culture in Vancouver in numerous capacities and continues to support both institutional and non-institutional artist run initiatives and projects.

Liz Park is a curator and writer currently based in Pittsburgh as Associate Curator of Carnegie International 2018. She has curated exhibitions at the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, the Kitchen in New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia, and Seoul Art Space_Geumcheon in Seoul. Her writing has been published by Afterimage, Afterall Online, ArtAsiaPacific, Performa Magazine, Fillip, MOMUS, Pluto Press, and Ryerson University Press among others. In 2011–2012 Park was Helena Rubinstein Fellow in the Curatorial Program at the Whitney Museum’s Independent Study Program, and in 2013-2015 she was Whitney-Lauder Curatorial Fellow at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia. The topics of her curatorial research and writing include the politics of visibility, representation of violence, ghosts, and non-western art in the global context of contemporary art.

Tanya Lukin Linklater’s performance collaborations, videos, photographs and installations have been exhibited at EFA Project Space, NYC; Museum of Contemporary Art Santiago, Chilé; SBC Gallery, Montreal; Western Front, Vancouver; Urban Shaman, Winnipeg; Images Festival + Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Toronto; grunt gallery, Vancouver; Nuit Blanche, Winnipeg; Museum of Contemporary Native Art, Santa Fe; Culver Center for the Arts, California; People of Good Will Project, Guelph; and elsewhere. She is compelled by the interstices of visual art and poetry, pedagogy, indigenous languages, portrayals of women and children in film, and the body. In 2016, she will present performances at Remai Modern, Saskatoon; Centre Phi + DHC / Art, Montreal; and the Belkin Gallery/UBC, Vancouver; and install new work at Art Gallery of Alberta in a two-person exhibition with Duane Linklater. Her poetry and essays have been published by C Magazine, Access Gallery, BlackFlash Magazine, Yellow Medicine Review, Taos International Journal of Poetry and Art, Drunken Boat, Ice Floe, Western Front Gallery, and McLaren Art Centre. Tanya studied at University of Alberta (M.Ed.) and Stanford University (A.B. Honours) where she received the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship and the Louis Sudler Prize for Creative and Performing Arts. She is currently a graduate student in Cultural Studies at Queen’s University. She was awarded the Chalmers Professional Development Grant in 2010 and the K.M. Hunter Artist Award in Literature in 2013. She originates from southern Alaska and is based in northern Ontario, Canada.

Postcommodity is an interdisciplinary arts collective comprised of Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martínez, Kade L. Twist and Nathan Young. Postcommodity’s art functions as a shared Indigenous lens and voice to engage the assaultive manifestations of the global market and its supporting institutions, public perceptions, beliefs, and individual actions that comprise the ever-expanding, multinational, multiracial and multiethnic colonizing force that is defining the 21st Century through ever increasing velocities and complex forms of violence. Postcommodity works to forge new metaphors capable of rationalizing our shared experiences within this increasingly challenging contemporary environment; promote a constructive discourse that challenges the social, political and economic processes that are destabilizing communities and geographies; and connect Indigenous narratives of cultural self-determination with the broader public sphere. Postcommodity are the recipients of grants from the Telluride Institute (2007), American Composers Forum (2008), Arizona Commission on the Arts (2009), Elly Kay Fund (2010), Joan Mitchell Foundation (2010), Creative Capital (2012), Art Matters (2013), and the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (2014). In 2011 the collective’s work was featured in Close Encounters, an international Indigenous exhibition exhibited in multiple venues throughout the city of Winnipeg; Contour, the 5th Biennial of the Moving Image in Mechelen, Belgium; Nuit Blanche, Toronto; Half Life: Patterns of Change, Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico; The Night is Filled With the Harmonics of Suburban Dreams, Lawrence Art Center, Lawrence, Kansas; Here, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Museum; 18th Biennale of Sydney in Sydney, Australia; Adelaide International in Adelaide, Australia; and Time Lapse, Site Santa Fe, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In 2013, Postcommodity exhibited their work at the Headlands Center for the Arts, and also opened their art space, Spirit Abuse, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In 2015, Postcommodity exhibited at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art and staged a site-specific 2-mile long land installation at the US/Mexican border near Douglas, Arizona.

Walter Scott is a Kahnawake-born, Montreal/Toronto based artist working in writing, illustration, performance and sculpture. His ongoing comic book series, Wendy, follows a young woman living in an urban centre whose dreams of contemporary art stardom are perpetually derailed. Recent exhibitions include Habitual Present, 8-11, Toronto; Pre-Existing Work, Macaulay and Co. Fine Art, Vancouver; and Stopping the Sun In Its Course at Francois Ghebaly, Los Angeles. In 2014 he was Artist-in-Residence at the Koganecho Bazaar in Yokohama.

cheyanne turions is an independent curator and writer who holds a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy from the University of British Columbia, and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in Visual Studies from the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design at the University of Toronto. From the farmlands of Treaty 8, she is of settler and Indigenous ancestry. Her work approaches the space of exhibition as alive: the gallery is a space of dialogue where artists, curators and publics can reflect on and experiment with ways of seeing and being in relation. Recently she curated Talking Back, Otherwise, a year-long exhibition at the Jackman Humanities Institute. Forthcoming writing projects include contributions to MAWA’s Desire/Change: Contemporary Canadian Feminist Art; Johanna Householder and Tanya Mars’s More Caught in the Act: An Anthology of Performance Art by Canadian Women; and Meryl McMaster’s Confluence. Her exhibition Other Electricities was presented the award for Innovation in a Collections-based Exhibition by the Ontario Association of Art Galleries in 2014. In 2015 she received the inaugural Reesa Greenberg Curatorial Studies Award and the Hnatyshyn Foundation’s Emerging Curator of Contemporary Canadian Art Award. She sits on the Board of Directors for Kunstverein Toronto, the Editorial Advisory Committee for C Magazine and the Advisory Board for the Art Museum at the University of Toronto. She is the director of No Reading After the Internet (Toronto).

SFU Galleries | Simon Fraser University

Wood Land School Critical Anthology

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

Jordan Wilson Curating the Self
Monday, February 29, 7PM

Curated by Jonah Gray

Or Gallery is pleased to present a talk by Vancouver-based curator Jordan Wilson, the third instalment in our Curating the Self lecture series.

Wilson will discuss his experiences and observations as a Musqueam community member and co-curator involved in producing the multi-site exhibition c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city. He will examine the issues present in the curation of a contemporary ethnographic (and ostensibly archaeological) exhibit, and the role of the curator—particularly a curator from the community represented—in such an endeavour. His talk will explore the question of balancing a community’s desire to right inaccurate historical representations of itself, while maintaining its privacy and control over knowledge. He will detail the challenges of respectfully approaching the representation of a collection of 10,000+ belongings (‘artefacts’) obtained through colonial displacement. He will also consider his own personal trajectory as an Indigenous curator and scholar.

Wilson is an independent curator, researcher and writer. He was a co-curator of the exhibit c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city, at the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. He is of mixed European-Indigenous ancestry and is a member of the Musqueam First Nation. He holds a Masters of Arts in Anthropology (museum studies stream) and a Bachelor of Arts in First Nations Studies, both obtained at UBC.


Following this lecture, Or Gallery will host a reading group focused on a text selected by Wilson from Audra Simpson’s book Mohawk Interruptus (2014). The reading group will take place at the Or on Wednesday March 2 at 7PM. Space is limited so please RSVP.

Curating the Self is a lecture series that explores the construction of identity in relation to the discipline of curating as well as the many forms of cultural assemblage that have lately begun to appropriate and adapt curatorial strategies for their own purposes.

Photo credit: M. Gallagher

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

Cathy Busby Power in the Darkness
Monday, February 22, 7PM

Curated by Jonah Gray

Or Gallery is pleased to present a talk by artist Cathy Busby, the second installment in our Curating the Self lecture series.

Busby will revisit the period when she first began exploring the politics of pain and its relief, and then consider how this theme has informed her more recent works. This early period of inquiry led to projects including her Self-Help Book Library (1994), the exhibition Where Does It Hurt? (1996) and culminated in a book she co-edited with Bill Burns and Kim Sawchuk entitled When Pain Strikes (University of Minnesota Press, 1998).

Early in the new millennium I began tracking public apologies in the news made by CEOs, sports stars and politicians. This became source material for a series of prints, installations and bookworks entitled Sorry. During this time the momentous, long-awaited apologies by federal governments were made to Aboriginal people for residential schools in Canada and the ‘Stolen Generations’ in Australia (2008). I felt their commemoration was important, especially in light of the assertion by Justice Murray Sinclair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that “We’re all in this together.” I made several iterations of We Are Sorry, temporary public monuments in Canada and Australia, as well as installations and bookworks (2008-16).

Still expanding ideas about pain relief, I undertook the project Steve’s Vinyl which led me to think about belongings, mourning, community and personal history. For many years I had kept the nearly 200 record albums my late brother Steve left me when he died of AIDS-related illness. I neither played nor looked at them. It gradually occurred to me to create an installation and performance giveaway event. A book documenting this event followed (Steve’s Vinyl, Emily Carr University Press + Visual AIDS New York, 2013).

Cathy Busby is a Canadian artist based in Vancouver. She has a PhD in Communication (Concordia University, 1999) and was a Fulbright Scholar at New York University (1995-96). She has an MA in Media Studies (Concordia University, 1992) and a BFA (1984) from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. She has been exhibiting her work internationally over the past 20 years.


In anticipation of this lecture, Or Gallery will host a reading group focused on two chapters from When Pain Strikes. The reading group will take place at the Or on Wednesday February 17 at 7PM. Space is limited so please RSVP .

Curating the Self is a lecture series that explores the construction of identity in relation to the discipline of curating as well as the many forms of cultural assemblage that have lately begun to appropriate and adapt curatorial strategies for their own purposes.

Photo: Cathy Busby with Steve’s Vinyl installation in process, Khyber Centre for the Arts, Halifax, 2011.
Thanks to TRB for the title and the Chronicle Herald, Halifax.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

Clamour and Toll presents Quiet City, Quiet City Presents Clamour and Toll
Daikyo Furoshiki, regularfantasy, V. Vecker
January 30, 9PM, 2016

Curated by Eli Bornowsky and Constantine Katsiris

One Night Only,
Presented by Or Gallery, Soundscape & Panospria

Sunset Terrace
2028 Clark Drive


The Or Gallery’s performance series Clamour and Toll teams up with Constantine Katsiris’ Quiet City to present an evening of experimental noise, pop and improve in honour of DaiKyoFuroShiki’s West Coast Civilization Shuffle Tour.


大凶風呂敷 (DaiKyoFuroShiki)
Cammisa Buerhaus (NYC) + Tamio Shiraishi (NYC/Tokyo)

Cammisa Buerhaus is a sound artist and actress who lives in NYC. She runs the record label Wild Flesh Productions, is a member of the theatre company NYC Players, cofounded the band 大凶風呂, and writes fanfiction about American politics. Her sound art and performances have traveled internationally, most recently at the CDG Cultergeist Foundation in Lisbon, Portugal and as sound designer for Felix Bernstein’s Bieber Bathos at The Whitney Museum of American Art.

Tamio Shiraishi is an alto saxophonist and vocalist who is a central figure in the history of art and noise music in Japan. He has played with the influential noise outfits Taco and A-Musik, and was an original member of Fushitsusha alongside Keiji Haino, for their first performances in 1978. From 1978 to 1980 Shiraishi was a key participant and organizer in the art and music scene surrounding the seminal music venue Club Minor. Located in the western Tokyo suburb of Kichijoji, Minor became a key site in the evolution of new Japanese music. The space and its regulars created a melting pot from countless hybrid musical forms, interweaving psychedelic rock, early electronic music, punk, and European jazz, in addition to hosting programs and acts that were considered too unconventional or unclassifiable for other venues. Since moving to New York in 1990, Shirashi has played with acts like No Neck Blues Band, Bill Nace, and Alan Licht, in addition to performing extensively as a soloist in unconventional locales across the city—most famously in subway stations. He is known for his distinctive style, playing almost exclusively in the sharp, blistering, uppermost register of the instrument.
——
regularfantasy:
liv carmen is a visual artist, and musician and DJ
regularfantasy, DJ silk, bobo eyes, plush throw
colliding visual textures, patterns, sounds, samples, references
to create new vistas of the sublime and sentimental and themes like materiality and memory
collage of influences, obfuscated mix of thrift store influences like thorny rose tramp stamps, justin timberlake and evocotive sectional couches, relishing in a theme of DIY luxury
nostalgia, pop, kitsch
house, techno, top 40, classic rock, indie rock, vapour wave and
whatever u cant quite put your finger on
on labels such as 1080p, total stasis, genero, dorm room productions, summer cool, forthcoming on isla
https://soundcloud.com/regfant
https://genero.bandcamp.com/album/born-on-the-weekend
——
Special Thanks to Sunset Terrace

regular fantasy performing at Clamour and Toll presents Quiet City

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

Suzanne Hudson Agnes Martin: Night Sea Journey
Monday, January 25, 7PM

Curated by Jonah Gray

Or Gallery is pleased to present a talk by Los Angeles-based art historian Suzanne Hudson, the first instalment of our new Curating the Self lecture series.

In 1963, Agnes Martin completed a six-foot-square oil on canvas entitled Night Sea. Within the suite of Martin’s classic grids from 1960–1967, Night Sea is as exemplary as it is exceptional, a shimmering realization of control and loss—made manifest in its specific physicality—that Martin would never repeat. In this talk, Hudson argues for the significance of Night Sea in Martin’s turn away from process-based works. After this, as Hudson will elaborate, the struggle to achieve a composition—to say nothing of the struggle for the self that it represents—happened elsewhere, at a safe remove from the art.

Hudson is Associate Professor of Art History and Fine Arts at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. She writes on modern and contemporary art with an emphasis on abstraction, painting, process, creativity, pedagogy, and American philosophy as it intersects with aesthetics and institutional discourses. She is the author of Robert Ryman: Used Paint (MIT Press, 2009; 2011), the coauthor and coeditor of Contemporary Art: 1989–Present (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013), and the author of Painting Now (Thames & Hudson, 2015). She is currently completing a book on Agnes Martin, forthcoming from Afterall Books: One Work/MIT Press.

In anticipation of this lecture, Or Gallery will host a reading group focused on Hudson’s essay for the compilation Heroine Paint: After Frankenthaler.

Curating the Self is a series of talks that will take the recent expansion of the field of curating as an occasion to explore the construction of identity in relation to the increasingly professionalized discipline of curating as well as the many forms of cultural assemblage (from certain contemporary art practices to the construction of social media personas) that are now also known as curating.

This series is the inaugural program curated by Or Gallery’s new Curator of Discursive Projects, Jonah Gray. Over the coming year, Gray will initiate an open-ended series of talks, podcasts and print-on-demand publications at the Or Gallery. These projects will complement the Or’s exhibition program, but will also go beyond the usual mandate of public programming to simply “animate” exhibitions.

Suzanne Hudson talk at the Or Gallery

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Project

Or Gallery at NADA Miami Beach
Editions by Lorna Brown, Raymond Boisjoly, Steven Brekelmans, Aaron Carpenter, Stan Douglas, Hadley+Maxwell, Marina Roy
December 3 — December 5, 2015

Booth 1.04
The Fontainebleau Miami Beach
4441 Collins Ave
Miami Beach, FL 33140

The Or Gallery is pleased to announce its participation in NADA Miami Beach 2015. The gallery will exhibit a small selection of editions and single works by Vancouver-based artists pertaining to the city’s strong history of conceptual photographic and textual practices. These include Guilty, 1950 (2010), a previously unreleased photographic edition by Stan Douglas from his acclaimed “Midcentury Studio” series; Temporary Structures II (2012) by Steven Brekelmans; and Sentences on Conceptual Art 1st Draft (2008) and Bungled Open Cube (2008) by Hadley+Maxwell.

Stan Douglas produced his “Midcentury Studio” series in 2010, meticulously staging a collection of photographs under the conceptual premise that they were the work of an anonymous Vancouver photographer practicing between 1945 and 1951. Work in the series includes studio shots of fashion and hair models, promotional shots for entertainers, candid street scenes and film noir-like snapshots of possible crime figures caught in the glare of a blinding flash bulb, destined for the newspaper pages. Guilty, 1950 is of this latter category. Reminiscent of the crime photography of Weegee (Arthur Fellig), the work depicts a well-coiffed man walking up a narrow stairwell, covering his face with his open palm against the ambushing photographer. The work stems from the same body of research used to produce Douglas’s critically acclaimed stage play Helen Lawrence, currently on international tour.

Steven Brekelmans’ series “Temporary Structures” draws on the artist’s interest in model kits and hobbies combined with an affinity for high modernist sculpture. The works were produced as a series of timed photographs, between which he reconfigured simple household craft supplies into new sculptural arrangements. Each print depicts 16 of these momentary works.

Hadley+Maxwell’s Bungled Open Cube (2008) and Sentences on Conceptual Art 1st Draft (2008) both started with a passage from Miguel de Cervantes’s Don Quixote: “The reason of the unreason with which my reason is afflicted so weakens my reason that with reason I murmur at your beauty.” Envisioning this sentence as part an early draft of Sol LeWitt’s 1969 Sentences on Conceptual Art, Hadley+Maxwell further extrapolate “prototypes” for LeWitt’s sentences and artworks, rendering them as crumpled notes rescued from the dustbin.

The Or Gallery will also present an assortment of drawings and Risograph editions, including works by Lorna Brown, Raymond Boisjoly, Aaron Carpenter and Marina Roy.

About the Or Gallery
The Or Gallery (est. 1983) is a non-profit artist-run centre committed to exhibiting work by local, national, and international artists whose art practice is of a critical, conceptual and/or interdisciplinary nature. Since its inception, the gallery has acted as a space for research, proposition making, conceptual experimentation and documentation. The works presented in this sale were contributed by the artists to assist the Or Gallery in its operations and to establish an international residency apartment and studio in Vancouver. We extend our deep thanks to the contributing artists and their gallery representatives, including David Zwirner Gallery (New York) and Catriona Jeffries Gallery (Vancouver).

Steven Brekelmans, Temporary Structures II (2012)

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

Or Gallery at the 2015 Offprint Paris Art Book Fair

12 — 15 November, 2015

Update: at police request the remaining two days of Offprint Paris have been cancelled.

The Or Gallery is pleased to be attending the 2015 Offprint Paris Art Book Fair, from November 12-15 at the Beaux-arts de Paris. We will be displaying a variety of our publications, including photo-based artist’s books by Ron Terada and Barb Choit; the Vancouver Anthology; Ginger Goodwin Way; and artists’ books and sound recordings by Steven Brekelmans and Fiona Curtis, Cranfield & Slade, Aaron Carpenter and Brady Cranfield & Jamie Hilder.

offprintparis.com

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

The Private Life of the Rabbit
Myfanwy MacLeod
31 October 2015 — 9 January, 2016
Reception Friday, October 30, 8PM

The Or Gallery is pleased to present a new solo exhibition by Vancouver artist Myfanwy MacLeod. The exhibition’s title is derived from the book The Private Life of the Rabbit (1964) by R.M. Lockley, a book which in turn informed Richard Adams’ harrowing children’s novel, Watership Down (1972).

For her exhibition, MacLeod builds from these sources, incorporating an over-sized pair of rabbit ears (initially proposed as a public artwork), along with a rabbit hutch recreated from photographs of the plywood hutch her father built for her family’s pet rabbits in London, Ontario.

The Private Life of the Rabbit marks the fifth of a series of exhibitions and projects curated and produced by Mark Lanctôt and Jonathan Middleton under the title The Troubled Pastoral. The series takes on a broad set of themes including pessimism, psychedelia, altered states and drug use, black comedy, science-fiction dystopia, class struggle (within the context of an increasingly marginal or absent middle class), the industrialization of food production, the ragged edge of suburbia, and various forms of visual, aural, or perceptual interference, including smoke, static, and electro-magnetic radiation.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



bookstore

Fred Moten

23 October — 7:00PM, 2015

Please join us for an incredible night of poetry and discussion with Fred Moten at the Or Gallery.

Poet and scholar Fred Moten, whose recent collection, The Feel Trio, was a 2014 National Book Award Finalist, explores the ways in which race and poetics—in the wake of colonialism and in the midst of ecological disaster—enter into artistic experimentation, shaping the conditions under which black poets work.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

Or Gallery at the 2015 Tokyo Art Book Fair

September 20 — 21, 2015
Reception 19 September, 3:00-8:00PM

BOOTH 36

The Or Gallery is pleased to be participating in the 7th annual Tokyo Art Book Fair. The event takes place at the Kyoto University of Art and Design/Tohoku University of Art and Design Gaien Campus, and will feature more than 300 publishers and bookmakers from around the world.

The Or Gallery will be presenting a selection of its books and records at the fair, including Ten Shows by Barb Choit; Brady Cranfield & Jamie Hilder’s Night Shift LP; Exercises in Kinesthetic Drawing and Other Drawing by Aaron Carpenter; Cockatoo Island by Ron Terada; If I wanted to sit on the sand I wouldn’t have brought this log by Steven Brekelmans and Fiona Curtis; 12 Sun Songs by Cranfield & Slade; and Stan Douglas’s seminal Vancouver Anthology, featuring essays by Keith Wallace, Sara Diamond, Nancy Shaw, Maria Insell, William Wood, Carol Williams, Robin Peck, Robert Linsley, Scott Watson, and Marcia Crosby.

The Or Gallery will also present its 2014 Risograph Portfolio, featuring prints by Lorna Brown, Aaron Carpenter, and Marina Roy.

Special thanks to the Canada Council for the Arts, Audience and Market Development Office. Thanks also to Makiko Hara for translation support.

More Information: Tokyo Art Book Fair

Cranfield & Slade, Sun SongsOr Gallery booth at the Tokyo Art Book Fair

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

Flesh and Blood
Steven Brekelmans
12 September — 24 October, 2015
Reception Friday, September 11, 8PM in conjunction with SWARM 16

The Or Gallery is pleased to present Flesh and Blood, an exhibition by Vancouver artist Steven Brekelmans. His new series of ink drawings on panel reference subcultural imagery such as underground comix and punk/heavy metal gig posters. Exhibited as a sculptural installation, the work employs images that harken to early expressions of anti-authoritarian counter-cultural movements, which have since shifted into established and anachronistic signifiers of “the underground” within mainstream popular culture. Flesh and Blood reconstructs the tropes of these aging visual languages and contextualizes them within the domain of contemporary art. Here Brekelmans’ enlarged cartoons display reverence for illustrated art forms, the coded black and white line work and the technical skill required to render them. The works are also simultaneously drawings, sculptures and (monochrome) paintings suggesting a mixture of 20th century art figures running from the quintessential low brow of Ed “Big Daddy” Roth through one liner New Yorker cartoons to major figures of abstract art such as Anne Truitt and Ellsworth Kelly. The ambiguity of this mixture is apparent and asks us to reflect critically on the historical movements of visual form and the qualities and conditions of human expression.

Steven Brekelmans was born in Vancouver, attended the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design and graduated from the University of Victoria’s MFA program. Working across a variety of mediums, he has exhibited his work both locally and internationally at CSA Space, UNIT/PITT Projects, Western Front, The Museum of Longing and Failure (Norway), The Western Bridge (Seattle), Or Gallery Berlin, and Soi Fischer Projects (Toronto).

Swarm 16

Steven Brekelmans Flesh and Blood

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Launch

If I wanted to sit on the sand I wouldn't have brought this log.
Steven Brekelmans & Fiona Curtis
at Kitsilano Beach, 20 June — 2:00 PM, 2015

Please join us at Kitsilano Beach on Saturday, June 20th for the launch of a new artists’ book by Steven Brekelmans and Fiona Curtis. “If I wanted to sit on the sand I wouldn’t have brought this log” is a summary of log scouting for the 2015 summer season; Long Beach, British Columbia.

We will aim to be at the north end of the beach, near the parking lot at McNicoll Ave and Arbutus St. Look for our blue Or Gallery flag. Any location updates will be posted on twitter @OrGallery

*Note: In the unlikely event of rain, the launch will be held at 2PM at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street) instead.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Artist-Talk


Rehab Nazzal
6 June — 2:00PM, 2015

Please join us on Saturday, June 6th at 2:00PM for an artist’s talk by Rehab Nazzal. Nazzal will discuss her photographic works, A Dead Sea, in #saltandwater: The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict. Nazzal is a Palestinian-born multidisciplinary artist based in Toronto.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

#saltandwater: The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict
Noor Abuarafeh, Ayed Arafah, Mais Darwazah, and Rehab Nazzal
6 June — 18 July, 2015
Reception 5 June, 8:00PM
Curated by Margaret Stern

The Or Gallery is pleased to present #saltandwater: The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict, an exhibition of four Palestinian artists. In his 1981 book, The Political Unconscious, Fredric Jameson asserts the idea of Louis Althusser’s “absent cause” within a structure. He posits that the structure itself is intrinsic to its effects, that Jacques Lacan’s “real” and Louis Althusser’s “absent cause” can never be represented in their entirety, as the signifier will always take the place of the signified. In looking at the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Jameson’s argument can bring new light to the violence and unspeakable totality of the ongoing occupation. Seemingly innocuous substances, salt and water, can be viewed as materials which are inherently political. Palestinians now receive at most 73 litres of water per capita, lower than the World Health Organization’s recommended 100 litres for daily consumption. The seas are another space of contestation, as access to the Dead Sea and the Mediterranean Sea is not available to Palestinians without severe security restrictions.

It is never until a life force is removed that one notices its critical importance. In the summer of 2014, approximately 350 Palestinian prisoners participated in a hunger strike. 183 administrative detainees – Palestinians held without charge or trial – were unfairly detained in Israeli jails. The hashtag that emerged from the strike was “#saltandwater,” supporting the consumption by the prisoners of only salt and water for survival. Salt and water became symbols for life, for solidarity, and symbols of a lack of access to basic human necessities. The Palestinian people do not have access to enough clean, useable water. They also do not have access to the seas. Gazan fishing boats are not able to reach waters to support their trade, while the Dead Sea is completely foreclosed to any Palestinian economic activity.

The curator, Margaret Stern, selected four Palestinian artists who work within this theme. They use water and salt as signifiers of the industrialization and politicization of resources with political ramifications for the human body. Rehab Nazzal’s A Dead Sea (2010), Noor Abuarafeh’s A State Closer to Death Than it is to Life (2012), Mais Darwazah’s My Love Awaits Me by the Sea (2013) and Ayed Arafah’s Horizon (2010) play with both salt and water to explore issues of boundaries and resources. Examining this conflict from the material realm of metaphor and bodily necessity allows questions to be asked of the occupation of the Palestinian people, their subsequent resistance, and the issues of resources within this area of conflict.

This exhibition is made possible with support from the Killy Foundation and the Audain Endowment for Curatorial Studies through the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory in collaboration with the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at The University of British Columbia.

#saltandwater

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



bookstore

Liquidate

May 28, 5:00 — 9:00PM, 2015

Access Gallery
222 East Georgia St.
Vancouver, BC

We have been busy spring cleaning and are looking to clear out some of our excess stock at huge discounts in an effort to make room for upcoming fall titles.

Books priced at 15-80% off, with lots of great gems from our vaults and newer titles at special discounts.

Publications by:

— Access Gallery
— Contemporary Art Gallery
— Fillip
— New Documents
— Or Gallery
— Presentation House Gallery
— Western Front

Plus a large collection of used and rare books recently decommissioned from the private collections of the Contemporary Art Gallery and Fillip!

Drinks provided by Jameson Irish Whiskey.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

Or Gallery at Offprint London Art Book Fair 2015

May 22 — 25, 2015

The Or Gallery is pleased to be attending the 2015 Offprint London Art Book Fair, from May 22-25 in the Turbine Hall of the Tate Modern. On this occasion the Or Gallery will be launching a new book of drawings by Steven Brekelmans and Fiona Curtis entitled If I wanted to sit on the sand I wouldn’t have brought this log (numbered edition of 400). We will also be displaying a variety of our other publications, including photo-based artist’s books by Ron Terada and Barb Choit; the Vancouver Anthology; Ginger Goodwin Way; artists’ books and sound recordings by Cranfield & Slade, Aaron Carpenter and Brady Cranfield & Jamie Hilder; the 2015 Risograph Portfolio with works by Lorna Brown, Marina Roy and Aaron Carpenter; and a selection of books published by Fillip and New Documents.

offprintlondon.com

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

Or Gallery at SELECT Fair NYC

May 14 — 17, 2015
Reception VIP Preview May 13, 6-10PM

Roy Arden
Lorna Brown
Aaron Carpenter
Stan Douglas
Hadley+Maxwell
David Horvitz
Marina Roy
Ron Terada

May 14–17, 2015

VIP preview: May 13, 6pm

Or Gallery at SELECT NYC
Booth #208
Center 548
548 West 22nd Street (former Dia Building)
Chelsea

www.orgallery.org
www.select-fair.com

The Or Gallery is pleased to announce its participation in the 2015 SELECT Fair NYC (May 13–17). The gallery will exhibit a small selection of editions and single works by Vancouver-based artists pertaining to the city’s strong history of conceptual photographic and textual practices. These include Guilty, 1950 (2010), a previously unreleased photographic edition by Stan Douglas from his acclaimed “Midcentury Studio” series; Cockatoo Island (2009) by Ron Terada; America is Waiting (2007) by Roy Arden; and Sentences on Conceptual Art 1st Draft (2008) and Bungled Open Cube (2008) by Hadley+Maxwell.

Stan Douglas produced his “Midcentury Studio” series in 2010, meticulously staging a collection of photographs under the conceptual premise that they were the work of an anonymous Vancouver photographer practicing between 1945 and 1951. Work in the series includes studio shots of fashion and hair models, promotional shots for entertainers, candid street scenes and film noir-like snapshots of possible crime figures caught in the glare of a blinding flash bulb, destined for the newspaper pages. Guilty, 1950 is of this latter category. Reminiscent of the crime photography of Weegee (Arthur Fellig), the work depicts a well-coiffed man walking up a narrow stairwell, covering his face with his open palm against the ambushing photographer. The work stems from the same body of research used to produce Douglas’s critically acclaimed stage play Helen Lawrence, currently on international tour.

Hadley+Maxwell’s Bungled Open Cube (2008) and Sentences on Conceptual Art 1st Draft (2008) both started with a passage from Miguel de Cervantes’s Don Quixote: “The reason of the unreason with which my reason is afflicted so weakens my reason that with reason I murmur at your beauty.” Envisioning this sentence as part an early draft of Sol LeWitt’s 1969 Sentences on Conceptual Art, Hadley+Maxwell further extrapolate “prototypes” for LeWitt’s sentences and artworks, rendering them as crumpled notes rescued from the dustbin. Ron Terada’s Cockatoo Island (2009) documents his walkabout of Cockatoo Island, site of the 2008 Sydney Biennale. Presented in a serial layout, Terada’s Cockatoo Island “blacks-out” any visual evidence regarding the works in the exhibit, the trajectory of his walk, or any clues to the island itself, instead making visible some of the contextual undertones of the event. Roy Arden’s America is Waiting is a digital collage derived from internet-sourced images of American popular culture, technology, landscapes, and various others. The work borrows its title from a song by Brian Eno and David Byrne from their 1981 album My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, which pioneered a technique of collaging or sampling from vernacular sound sources.

About the Or Gallery
The Or Gallery (est. 1983) is a non-profit artist-run centre committed to exhibiting work by local, national, and international artists whose art practice is of a critical, conceptual and/or interdisciplinary nature. Since its inception, the gallery has acted as a space for research, proposition making, conceptual experimentation and documentation. The works presented in this sale were contributed by the artists to assist the Or Gallery in establishing an international residency apartment and studio in Vancouver. We extend our deep thanks to the contributing artists and their gallery representatives, including David Zwirner Gallery (New York), Catriona Jeffries Gallery (Vancouver), Jessica Bradley Gallery (Toronto), and Monte Clark Gallery (Vancouver).

Stan Douglas: Guilty, 1950 (2010)

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Geoffrey Winthrop-Young

27 April — 7 PM, 2015

April 27th
Geoffrey Winthrop-Young: “A Turbine Driven by Blood”: Ernst Jünger’s “Total Mobilization” between Hitler and Heidegger

First published in 1930, “Total Mobilization” marks Ernst Jünger’s departure from his radical right-wing journalism of the late 1920s, which on occasion took on an insurrectionist flair and was carried out in in critical solidarity with the fledgling Nazi party. Moving away from a more explicit engagement with politics, it looks ahead to Jünger’s most important essay, the still untranslated Der Arbeiter (“The Worker”), and beyond to the increasingly abstract mytho-historical reflections that would come to occupy him for the rest of a very long life (1895-1998). It is — even for Jünger — an uneven text, ambivalent in its evaluation of technology, and caught between a radical nationalism and the invocation of a ‘planetary’ techno-evolution that can do without nations and peoples, including Germany and the Germans. The ambiguities of style and argument have to do with the fact that the essay is in many ways an attempt, as it were, to un-lose the First World War by revealing an allegedly more profound level of events, a hidden evolution now emerging in the shape of a total military, economic, social, and psychic “mobilization,” in which the conventional narratives of winners and losers no longer apply. This invites comparisons with the analysis of WWI in Hitler’s Mein Kampf and Martin Heidegger’s attempts to come to grips with the ongoing WWII in the recently published infamous “Black Notebooks.”

Recommended reading: https://visrfreeschool.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/junger-total-mobilization-doc.pdf

Geoffrey Winthrop-Young is Acting Head of the Department of Central, Eastern and Northern European Studies at UBC and teaches in the German and Scandinavian programs.

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission