Special-Event

A Holiday Party & Edition Launch at the Or Gallery

Thursday December 11th — 7 - 10:30 PM, 2014

Cocktails! Editions! DJs! Fun times for all.

Launch of the new Or Gallery Risograph Edition Portfolio with prints by Lorna Brown, Aaron Carpenter, and Marina Roy.

PLUS White Columns Print Portfolio (2007)
letter-press prints by Peter Doig, Dave Muller, Adam Pendleton, and Kay Rosen.

PLUS Or Gallery editions by Stan Douglas, Ron Terada, Nicole+Ryan, Hadley+Maxwell

PLUS Fillip & New Document editions

DJ Kathy Slade! DJ Kevin Romaniuk!

Discounts on Or Bookstore books and more!

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Robert Brain

December 8 — 7PM, 2014

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s third session, which will be organized around the theme of “Aesthetics and Politics,” will be held from Sept – Dec, 2014. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period.

Though we have an operational budget of $0, the seminars will be free to the public. All professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians
Chapter 13 (Negating the Negation Faction)

December 8
Robert Brain
On Silicon Valley’s Quantified Self Movement

“The Quantified Self” is a movement organized around the individual consumer’s increasingly sophisticated capacity for digital self-surveillance of her body in terms of inputs (e.g. nutrition, air quality, etc…), affective coordinates (e.g. mood, arousal, blood oxygen levels,…), and performance levels (both mental and physical). Professor Brain will scrutinize the historical precedents and biopolitical implications of this Silicon Valley based lifestyle movement.

Bio:
Dr. Robert Brain’s research interests centre on problems of the cultural history of the sciences in the long nineteenth-century, with special foci in the relations between the sciences and the arts of modernism, the role of the sciences in modern empire and colonial expansion; evolution and the sciences of mind, brain, and behaviour; instruments and material cultures of laboratory and field; visuality and representation in the sciences; history of universal expositions, world’s fairs, and modern museums; cybernetics and media theory, cultural history of philosophy and systems of thought.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Nicole Shukin

1 December — 7 PM, 2014

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s third session, which will be organized around the theme of “Aesthetics and Politics,” will be held from Sept – Dec, 2014. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period.

Though we have an operational budget of $0, the seminars will be free to the public. All professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians
Chapter 13 (Negating the Negation Faction)

December 1
Nicole Shukin
Striking Images: The Politics of Cinematic Affect

An early silent film classic – Sergei Eisenstein’s Strike (1925) – will serve as this seminar’s entry point into larger questions of aesthetics and politics. The technique of dialectical montage that Eisenstein practices in this film – exemplified by a scene in which the brutal suppression of striking factory workers is dramatically intercut with shots of a bull being stunned with a pole-axe, and then slaughtered – prompts an analysis of the politics of cinematic affect. For Eisenstein, such startling juxtapositions of images were themselves designed to strike spectators with visceral force, by-passing representation in order to directly affect viewers and move them to political action. His cinematic philosophy poses an immediate connection between aesthetics and politics that I suggest underlies how the radical relation between the two continues to be thought today.

Eisenstein’s practice of dialectical montage has received ample critical attention, and in this seminar we’ll have a chance to compare two different takes on his socialist cinema, one by Jonathan Beller in The Cinematic Mode of Production and the other by Jacques Rancière in Film Fables. Yet what I propose is at once most obvious and yet overlooked in aesthetic or biopolitical readings of Eisenstein’s cinema is the homology that Strike inadvertently implies between animal slaughter and the affective force of moving images. How exactly are animal slaughter and moving images interimplicated, and what does this interimplication signal for how a politics of species may need to be better accounted for in any aesthetic politics of equality?

Readings:

Jonathan Beller, Chapter Two (“The Spectatorship of the Proletariat”) in The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle (Dartmouth College/University Press of New England, 2006).

Jacques Rancière, “Eisenstein’s Madness,” in Film Fables (Bloomsbury Academic, 2006).

Bio:
Nicole Shukin is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Victoria, and member of the interdisciplinary graduate program in Cultural, Social, and Political Thought (CSPT). She specializes in Canadian Literature, cultural studies (with a focus on theories of biopower, animal studies, and the politics of nature), and poststructuralist, (post)Marxist, and posthumanist theory. Dr. Shukin has contributed to the edited volumes Against Automobility (Blackwell 2006) and Deleuze and Feminist Theory (Edinburgh 2000). She has published in the journals ESC, Social Semiotics, Canadian Literature, and Discourse: Journal for Theoretical Studies in Media and Culture, The Dalhousie Review and CR: The New Centennial Review.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Amy Kazymerchyk

24 November — 7 PM, 2014

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s third session, which will be organized around the theme of “Aesthetics and Politics,” will be held from Sept – Dec, 2014. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period.

Though we have an operational budget of $0, the seminars will be free to the public. All professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians
Chapter 13 (Negating the Negation Faction)

November 24
Amy Kazymerchyk
Surface Tension: Up Against a [White] Wall

In states of illness, pain, delirium or trauma, infallibility is often suspended. Perceptual and sensorial systems may distort. Emotion and intuition may become highly sensitive or muted. Cognition may slack. The capacity to view, annunciate or gesture may be halted or restrained. One’s relation to aesthetic, social and political spheres (shaken by the trembling of others) are often ruptured, or severed even. In convalescence (singular and collective), the last infallible is the wall: the bedroom wall– the hospital wall–the prison wall–the analyst’s wall–the military wall–the wall of language–the gallery wall. Surface Tension will consider experience (visual, ideological, rhetorical, reflexive, kinetic) up against these walls.

Bio:
Amy Kazymerchyk is the curator of SFU Galleries Audain Gallery. She has programmed for VIVO Media Arts Centre, the Signal + Noise Media Arts Festival, Vancouver Queer Film Festival and DIM Cinema at The Cinematheque. Amy has contributed to Artist-Run Culture in Vancouver in numerous capacities and continues to support both institutional and non-institutional artist run initiatives and projects.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Launch

Donato Mancini
New Star Books: Loitersack

Saturday, Novermber 22nd, 8:30PM

New Star Books launch

In his new book Loitersack, Donato Mancini (You Must Work Harder to Write Poetry of Excellence, Bookthug, 2012) extends his inquiry of Canadian poetry and poetics in the form of a book that contains poetry, poetics, theory and theory theatre.

In many ways a companion piece to You Must Work Harder, Loitersack works through some of the problems and questions Mancini posed in that work, a more manifest (if not traditional) work of criticism. Loitersack is in some senses a commonplace book — a scrapbook of borrowed quotations — in other senses it is the poet’s personal book of critical reflections, describing a broad topography of poetic knowledge. Like all Mancini’s work, it’s wired for explosive laughter; and as in all his previous work, Mancini sets out to write a book unlike anything else he — or anyone else, for that matter — has ever read.

The launch party will include a short poetry reading by Mr. Mancini, followed by the Vancouver premiere public reading of Mancini’s 1-act neo-absurdist play “THEQRY” (featured in Loitersack) featuring Ash Lee as OFFICER, Jesse Malakoe as DONNY, Lisa McLeod as ISADORA, and Dawn McLeod as MOTHER.

Doors open at 8:30 and the performance will begin promptly at 9:00 pm. Refreshments will be provided and books will be for sale.

More info about the book at NewStarBooks.com
more event details on Facebook

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton Street.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Jerry Zaslove

10 November — 7 PM, 2014

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s third session, which will be organized around the theme of “Aesthetics and Politics,” will be held from Sept – Dec, 2014. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period.

Though we have an operational budget of $0, the seminars will be free to the public. All professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians
Chapter 13 (Negating the Negation Faction)

*November 10
*Jerry Zaslove
“Benjamin’s ‘Litmus Test’: The Aesthetics of Violence and Culture as an ‘Enigmatic Signifier‘”

I will try to conceptualize Benjamin¹s use of violence as the State driven “enigmatic signifier” of culture that creates complicity that masks the negative of repression of violence within the rights based powerlessness of culture to arrest structural violence. The enigma of the negative of violence in modernity lies in the fear and reality of complicity with violence.

Bio:
Jerry Zaslove is a teacher and writer in the fields of Comparative Literature and Social History of Art influenced but not limited by the traditions of critical theory for the arts, aesthetics, psychoanalysis, and social thought. Most recent writing: “Kafka in the’ Penal Colony”, essays on the place of the University in society, Exile and memory, the City in History – Elsewhere and Otherwise, forms and social realities of thinking about community. Dr. Zaslove has taught at SFU since its opening year – home in English, Humanities, and as Founding Director of the Institute for the Humanities.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Samir Gandesha

3 November — 7 PM, 2014

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s third session, which will be organized around the theme of “Aesthetics and Politics,” will be held from Sept – Dec, 2014. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period.

Though we have an operational budget of $0, the seminars will be free to the public. All professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians
Chapter 13 (Negating the Negation Faction)

November 3
Samir Gandesha
“The ‘Neo-Liberal Personality’ and the Politics of Disgust”

In 2008, the global capitalist order experienced its worst crisis since October, 1987, if not, of the stock market crash and ensuing Great Depression of the 1930’s. Despite evidence that neo-liberal policies were responsible, for example, of the deregulation of financial markets, neo-liberal austerity policies continue to be rolled out in most of the advanced industrialized world. Indeed, in Britain, a key early laboratory of neo-liberalism (along with Pinochet’s Chile), austerity policies continue to exact a particularly harsh toll on the poor and much of the middle class. Far from being contested in England, however, neo-liberalism has become so normalized that, according to a recent article in the Guardian, Durham City Council has adapted the board game Monopoly to enable it to engage in public consultations to ascertain not whether further cuts to social services ought to be made but how and where such cuts ought to be carried out. Would the council make its next round of cuts to the arts or to local health-care services? Austerity, it would appear, can be participatory and fun. Neo-liberalism raises, therefore, a question posed by the Frankfurt School after “the moment to realize philosophy was missed” that is, in the aftermath of the ill-fated revolutionary reverberations throughout Europe sparked by the moment of 1917, and identified by Deleuze and Guattari, in the aftermath of May, 1968: namely, how do people come to love the conditions of their own domination? This becomes a central question for the struggle for alternatives to a social order whose current trajectory spells catastrophe on a planetary scale. As a provisional contribution towards answering this question, the talk will pose the possibility of a concept of the “neo-liberal personality.”

Bio: Samir Gandesha is the Director of the Institute for Humanities at SFU.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Andrew Feenberg

27 October — 7 PM, 2014

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s third session, which will be organized around the theme of “Aesthetics and Politics,” will be held from Sept – Dec, 2014. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period.

Though we have an operational budget of $0, the seminars will be free to the public. All professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians
Chapter 13 (Negating the Negation Faction)

October 27
Andrew Feenberg
Lukács’s Theory of Reification and Contemporary Social Movements

Lukács’s theory of reification, explained in his 1923 work History and Class Consciousness, is often interpreted as a theory of ideology, however it is also a theory of social practice and a social ontology. Reification and dereification describe different types of social practice, individual technical practices aimed at adaptation, survival, and success, and collective transforming practices with the potential for establishing a solidary socialist society. Although many aspects of Lukács’s early work are no longer applicable , this distinction is relevant to struggles around technology today, such as environmental struggles or struggles over medical practices.

Bio:
Andrew Feenberg is Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of Technology in the School of Communication, Simon Fraser University, where he directs the Applied Communication and Technology Lab.

https://www.amazon.com/author/andrewfeenberg

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Steve Collis

October 20 — 7PM, 2014

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s third session, which will be organized around the theme of “Aesthetics and Politics,” will be held from Sept – Dec, 2014. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period.

Though we have an operational budget of $0, the seminars will be free to the public. All professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians
Chapter 13 (Negating the Negation Faction)

October 20
Steve Collis
The Future Anterior, or, What We Better (Not) Have Done Tomorrow

With the concept of “built-in” climate change—the idea that there is enough carbon still buried in the ground, but already financialized as assets by the fossil fuel industry, to push us over the brink of catastrophic climate change—we circle back to the Cold War era idea of “mutually assured destruction.” Indeed, “nuclear winter” and climate change are mirror images and potential results of the self-destructive behaviour the human race has somehow “engineered.” In both instances, the idea of the future becomes very tenuous indeed.

Interestingly, oil industry giants like Shell Oil and Kinder Morgan employ “futurists” to produce “scenarios” of likely futures their companies will have to exist, and profit, in. The future, in these documents, is revealed as an imaginative, if limited (the “house always wins” in these scenarios) terrain. In this presentation, poet and activist Stephen Collis will lead a discussion aimed at the utopian goal of taking the future back from the futurists who have already put a price on it, sold it, and all-but burnt it. Survival, we might find, begins with a little matter of imagining alternative tomorrows. This in turn opens the question of the relation of aesthetics to politics—something that becomes all the more important when considering the problematic space of the future.

The reading for this session is from a work in progress, entitled “Scenarios,” that is something of a hybrid essay/serial poem. “Scenarios” ends with a brief questionnaire that participants are invited to answer in advance of the session.

Bio:
Stephen Collis is a poet and professor of contemporary literature at Simon Fraser University. His many books of poetry include The Commons (Talon Books 2008; second edition 2014), On the Material (Talon Books 2010—awarded the BC Book Prize for Poetry), and To the Barricades (Talon Books 2013). He has also written two books of criticism and a novel, The Red Album (BookThug 2013). His collection of essays on the Occupy movement, Dispatches from the Occupation (Talon Books 2012), is a philosophical meditation on activist tactics, social movements, and change. In September 2013 Coach House Books published DECOMP, a collaborative photo-essay and long poem written with Jordan Scott.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Two Films About Pressure
Andreas Bunte
October 18 — November 22, 2014
Reception Friday, October 17, 8pm

Underdruck (Low Pressure), 2013
16mm film transferred to HD Video, colour, sound, 12:00 min.

Künstliche Diamanten (Synthetic Diamonds), 2013
16mm film transferred to HD Video, colour, sound, 13:16 min.

The Or Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition by Berlin-based artist Andreas Bunte. The two films of the installation revolve around the human attempt to reproduce the high and low pressure that occurs in nature. This seemingly scientific concern serves as the starting point for an investigation into two particular sites and technologies affected by the fall of the Berlin Wall and the re-unification of Germany.

Künstliche Diamanten (Synthetic Diamonds) depicts the process–from beginning to end–of synthetic diamonds being produced. The recordings were made at the Vollstädt Diamant GmbH, a company set up by mineralogist Professor Heiner Vollstädt, who began his research on the production of synthetic diamonds in the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) 40 years ago at the Zentralinstitut für Physik der Erde (Central Institute for Physics of the Earth). In the late 1970s the production of synthetic diamonds became a prestigious project for the GDR government, with the aim of ending the GDR’s dependency on diamond imports from the USSR and the West.

After the reunification of Germany the Institute was discontinued. Vollstädt transported some of the machinery from the former Academy of Science of the GDR to a disused military camp outside Potsdam to continue his research and the production of synthetic diamonds as a private enterprise.

Unterdruck (Low Pressure) was shot in an Athletic training facility in the former GDR that was built in the late 1970s to simulate the effects of high altitudes. Allowing athletes to prepare for performing in atmospheres different to those found in the GDR, it reduced the need for athletes to travel outside Eastern Europe. A top secret facility at the time, the site was abandoned after the peaceful revolution of 1989 that ultimately led to the unification of Germany. The fate of the site was the result of a double economic incompatibility: it was too expensive to be kept in use, and too expensive to be dismantled.

Andreas Bunte lives and works in Berlin, Germany. He is currently a fellow at the Norwegian Artistic Research Fellowship Programme of the Academy of Fine Art Oslo.

Both films were commissioned by Cornerhouse Manchester for the show Anguish & Enthusiasm: What Do You Do With Your Revolution Once You’ve Got It, curated by Sarah Perks and Declan Clarke. This exhibition is produced in collaboration with SFU School for the Contemporary Arts and Republic Gallery, and is part of the Or Gallery’s Slow Frequency series in partnership with Threewalls and devening projects + editions (Chicago).

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



bookstore

Vancouver Art/Book Fair 2014
Vancouver Art Gallery, 750 Hornby St.
4 — 5 October, 2014
Reception (Vancouver Art Gallery & Project Space Members Only) Friday 3 October, 6-8PM

The Or Gallery & Or Bookstore will be participating in toe 2014 Vancouver Art/Book Fair. Free and open to the public, the Vancouver Art/Book Fair is the only international art book fair in Canada and one of only two on the West Coast. In 2014 the event launches with a Members Preview on October 3 from 6–8pm and takes place on October 4 and 5 from 12pm to 5pm. It is anticipated to attract over 1,500 visitors from across the Greater Vancouver Area and beyond.

Presented by Project Space, VA/BF is a two-day festival of artists’ publishing featuring nearly one hundred local, national and international publishers, as well as a diverse line-up of programs, performances and installations. Featured artists travel to Vancouver from across Canada and the globe, and produce everything from books, magazines, zines and printed ephemera to digital, performative or other experimental forms of publication.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

The Troubled Pastoral Series: 31 soleils (Dawn Chorus)
Jean-Pierre Aubé
5 September — 11 October, 2014
Reception Thursday 4 September, 8:00PM
Curated by Mark Lanctôt and Jonathan Middleton

31 soleils (Dawn Chorus) is a video of a solar transit filmed through an H-Alpha solar telescope accompanied by a composition created from recordings of 31 different frequencies culled from the extremely low end of the radio spectrum. The piece refers to a specific phenomenon where at dawn one can pick up – if using the proper equipment – an array of radio signals that are not usually within geographic range.

Aubé has developed a system of tracking and compiling frequencies allowing him to indirectly monitor displacements and variations of the sun’s radio waves and its effect on the range and power of a variety of broadcast systems on earth. This data is then used as a score to create the composition from the same material, i.e., evangelical preachers, cuban propaganda, Taiwanese commercial radio.

The image of the sun was filmed through an H-Alpha telescope (which filters out all of the light spectrum save red, but not any red: a red that corresponds to the wavelength of Hydrogen). The video shows the state of the sun, visually echoing its affect on the propagation of waves.

The exhibition also features a second piece that employs a similar process: V.L.F. Finland – 21.12.2002 captures the sound of Northern Lights and signals from Russian submarines.

31 soleils (Dawn Chorus) marks the fourth of a series of exhibitions and projects curated and produced by Mark Lanctôt and Jonathan Middleton under the title The Troubled Pastoral. The series takes on a broad set of themes including pessimism, psychedelia, altered states and drug use, black comedy, science-fiction dystopia, class struggle (within the context of an increasingly marginal or absent middle class), the industrialization of food production, the ragged edge of suburbia, and various forms of visual, aural, or perceptual interference, including smoke, static and electro-magnetic radiation.

Jean-Pierre Aubé lives and works in Montreal.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Screening

Aaron Carpenter, Ovide Cohen, Stan Douglas, Allison Hrabluik, Marina Roy, Kevin Schmidt, Dan Starling
Edinburgh Art Festival Film Club: Vigne

Screening// Wednesday, August 6, 7PM (GMT)
Curated by Jonathan Middleton

Or Gallery is pleased to present Vigne, a series of short videos by Vancouver-based artists. Using the rhizomatic structure of vines as a departure point, the series explores the vignette as a form, but also tangentially considers themes of doubling, identity, and speculation.

This year’s Edinburgh Art Festival Film Club considers the themes raised by its main exhibition Where do I end and you begin. The programme explores subjects including post – digital nomadism, non-materialism and the importance of virtual identities. The festival invited four artist-run spaces from across the Commonwealth: Or Gallery, Canada; Dog Park Art Projects Space, New Zealand; KHOJ International, India and Embassy Gallery, Scotland to prepare selections of moving image work by promising artists from their countries.

At:
CodeBase, Argyle House, 3 Lady Lawson Street, Edinburgh,
EH3 9DR

Free tickets at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/

Marina Roy, Sleeper (video still), 2004

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Event

One Night Only
Dan Starling and Barb Choit
August 2 — 5:00PM, 2014

Please join the Or Gallery for an evening with Vancouver based artist Dan Starling and New York and Vancouver based artist Barb Choit on Saturday, August 2nd.

Barb Choit will show a new work entitled 20th Century Sculpture/20th Century Sculpture: a slide presentation curated from the 35mm slide collection at Emily Carr University of Art and Design. 20th Century(…) is a follow up project to Choit’s 2002 artist book Ten Shows, which documents ten slide shows that she curated from the slide library at the California Institute of the Arts. Twelve years later, to coincide with the republishing of her original artist book by the Or Gallery, Choit has curated a new selection of 35mm slides to be projected as an installation piece. Choit scoured the ECUAD 35mm slide collection for images of 20th Century sculptures that exist in duplicate within the library’s holdings. She used these image pairs to create two near-identical slide presentations to be projected side-by-side. The resulting work is an art historical survey of 20th Century sculptures within the ECUAD collection—doubled. Showing the duplicate images adjacent to each other reveals inconsistent photographic conditions, such as fading film stock, uneven cropping, or the accidental reversal of images. As a whole, this collection of idiosyncratic image-objects comprise a visual archive of the institution’s pedagogy.

Dan Starling will read from his new book The Culture Industry and the Propaganda Factory, co-presented by New Documents and Malaspina Printmakers. The Culture Industry and the Propaganda Factory is a complete rewrite of Roald Dahl’s classic book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, reimagining Dahl’s book as an absurdist fairytale overlayed on top of and intertwining with Dahl’s original illustrated narrative. When Charlie and the Chocolate Factory was first published in 1964, it was severely criticized by the NAACP and others for its depiction of the workers at Willy Wonka’s factory as “black pigmies from Africa.” Dahl eventually sympathized with these critiques, revising the book in 1973 and recasting the workers as the Oompa Loompas the book is now well known for.

Using this literary history as a point of reference, Starling imagines four subsequent revisions, each less and less able to cope with what he sees as the “unknown trauma” Dahl’s second edition attempted to repress. In our version (Starling’s third revision), the story has become a tale of the journey of five children to the Culture Industry’s “Propaganda Factory.”

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



bookstore

Summer Sale

July 11 — August 2, 2014

Or Bookstore’s Summer Sale is on from now until August 2nd! Everything in the store is 10-60% off. Buy three books and get a free tote bag; buy five and get a free Or Gallery mug too! Come stock up on your beach reading, then go out and get your new tote all sandy.

Or Gallery publications 30% off
magazine back issues: 60% off
everything else in store: 10% off

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Visiting Curators Talks at the Contemporary Art Gallery

Saturday 17 May, 7:00PM, 2014

Contemporary Art Gallery
555 Nelson Street

Please join us for a series of presentations discussing their programs and institutions by German curators Maike Behm (Kunsthalle Lingen), Bart van der Heide, (Kunstverein München) and Melanie Bono (Westphälisches Landesmuseum Münster and Skultpturprojekte Münster), on the occasion of their research visit to Vancouver. Presented in partnership with the Contemporary Art Gallery and the Embassy of Canada in Berlin. For more information on the curators click here: READ MORE.

Image: Kunsthalle Lingen, Germany.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Dust on the Lens
Jeremy Everett, Simone Jones, Richard T. Walker and Will Wilson
10 May — 28 June, 2014
Reception Friday, May 9, 8pm
Curated by Michaela Rife

The Or Gallery is pleased to present Dust on the Lens, a group exhibition featuring works by Jeremy Everett, Simone Jones, Richard T. Walker and Will Wilson.

This exhibition joins four recent artistic responses to the desert of the American West, arguably one of the most conflicted and contradictory North American geographies. The desert is at once exploited and protected, poisoned and adored. With one eye to preceding generations of artists in the desert (from canonical sculptors to the anthropological projects of photographers), and another to contemporary realities of land use, each artist employs a lens-based medium to consider the site. Theirs is not the fantastical desert of mystics or the wilderness of pilgrimage, rather it is a land very much impacted by its human and technological histories.

In some cases these realities are confronted by introducing everyday technologies to sublime, protected sites. In others, the artist’s body is introduced to the image, complicating the expected relationship between the ostensibly untouched wilderness and the human. The nexus between the American desert and the artist’s lens opens onto crucial questions that demand the viewer rethink their place in traditionally accepted categories of nature and landscape.

Dust on the Lens is guest curated by Michaela Rife, a candidate to the Master’s Degree in Critical and Curatorial Studies at The University of British Columbia.

This exhibition is made possible with support from the Killy Foundation and the Audain Endowment for Curatorial Studies through the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory in collaboration with the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at The University of British Columbia.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Project

Death & Objects III
Christian Pelech
April 23 — April 25, 2014
Reception Tuesday, April 22, 8-10PM

Offsite project at 1965 Main Street, Vancouver

But the iniquity of oblivion blindly scattereth her poppy, and deals with the memory of men without distinction to merit of perpetuity

- Sir Thomas Browne, from Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial (1658)

The Or Gallery is pleased to present work by Vancouver artist Christian Pelech as its contribution to Thru the Trapdoor, a 5-day art event located in the former Aldebridge Mini-storage at 1965 Main Street, a building that has housed VIVO Media Arts (formerly Video In Studios and Video Out Distribution), ON MAIN, Gallery 1965, New Forms Festival, and many other organizations and artists.

Pelech’s drawing, excerpt from “An Abridged History of Death and Taxes” pgs. 29-43 (2014, pencil on tax ledger) is a year long meditation on the various representations of death, in dialogue with the writings of Sir Thomas Browne. The work forms part three of the Or Gallery’s ongoing Death & Objects series of exhibitions dealing with the still life, sculpture, and momento mori. This project was curated by Or Gallery Director/Curator Jonathan Middleton on the occasion of the demise of this important arts facility in Vancouver, and the specific context of the Aldebridge Mini-storage, a site that was left with many personal artifacts, left or abandoned by their previous owners.

Christian Pelech, excerpt from "An Abridged History of Death and Taxes" pgs. 29-43 (2014, pencil on tax ledger) (detail)

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

How Wheeling Feels When the Ground Walks Away
James Hoff
April 5 — May 3, 2014
Reception Saturday, April 5, 8PM (Artist talk at 7PM)
Curated by Kathy Slade

The Or Gallery is pleased to present How Wheeling Feels When the Ground Walks Away, an eight channel immersive sound installation by James Hoff. The audio composition is comprised of samples from approximately fifty riots spanning four decades, which took place at concerts varying from a John Cage concert in Italy to a Dead Prez concert at Evergreen State College, and in the streets during political unrest in India, China, and Greece.

James Hoff is an artist and publisher who lives and works in New York. He works across diverse formats including the artists’ book, live performance, writing, painting, sculpture, and sound art. Guided by both his editorial practice and archival impulses, Hoff employs minor histories as source material, which are then re-worked or re-contextualized, forging new relations that reflect on contemporary practice or further compound, expand, or expose the underlying history.

Hoff has recently participated in exhibitions at: MoMA, New York; VI,VII, Oslo, Norway; TEAM Gallery, New York; IMO, Copenhagen, Denmark; Air de Paris, Paris, France; LUMA Foundation, Zurich, Switzerland; and Publication Studio Vancouver. Hoff co-founded the non-profit art organization Primary Information with Miriam Katzeff in 2006.

How Wheeling Feels When the Ground Walks Away is guest curated by Kathy Slade and marks the second of a series of exhibitions and projects comprising The Troubled Pastoral. The series, conceived of by Mark Lanctôt and Jonathan Middleton, takes on a broad set of themes including pessimism, psychedelia, altered states and drug use, black comedy, science-fiction dystopia, class struggle (within the context of an increasingly marginal or absent middle class), the industrialization of food production, the ragged edge of suburbia, and various forms of visual, aural, or perceptual interference, including smoke, static, and electro-magnetic radiation.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



bookstore

The Magazine Buyer's Club

Starting February, 2014

Or Bookstore is excited to introduce the Magazine Buyer’s Club! Sign up to get each new issue of any of our featured periodicals.

The Buyer’s Club currently features six publications:

SAN ROCCO is a magazine about architecture written by architects.

THE EXHIBITIONIST is a journal for curators by curators.

PETUNIA is a feminist art & entertainment magazine.

TOILET PAPER is a magazine (but kind of an artists’ book) by Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari.

OCTOBER is an art criticism & theory heavyweight.

FILLIP is a journal of art, culture and ideas published in Vancouver, BC.

Membership gets you 10% off each magazine. We’ll let you know when a new issue arrives at the store, and keep it safe for you until you can stop by for it. Worldwide shipping is also available. Please drop us a line if you’d like to join!

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free