talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Christina Hendricks

20 April — 7 PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 2 – Am Johal – Nomos of the Anthropocene (Media Philosophy, European Graduate School)

March 9 – Willow Verkerk (Philosophy Grad Student: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) – Antigone’s Heroism

March 16th – Carla Nappi (UBC History and STS) – Prepositioning History

March 23rd – Glen Coulthard (UBC First Nations Studies and Poli Sci) – Urbs Nullius: Gentrification and Decolonization

March 30th – Matt Hern (urban space activist, SFU and UBC Urban Studies instructor) – Land As Freedom

April 6th – Geoff Mann (SFU Geography) – Sovereignty in a Warming World

April 13th – Harsha Walia (social justice activist) – Undoing Border Imperialism

April 20th – Christina Hendricks (UBC Philosophy) – Foucault on Beheading the Sovereign

April 27th – Geoffrey Winthrop-Young (UBC CENES and Media Studies) – “A Turbine Driven by Blood”: Ernst Jünger’s “Total Mobilization” between Hitler and Heidegger

April 20th
Christina Hendricks – Foucault on Beheading the Sovereign

“What we need … is a political philosophy that isn’t erected around the problem of sovereignty, nor therefore around the problems of law and prohibition. We need to cut off the King’s head: in political theory that has still to be done.”

So said Michel Foucault in an interview first published in 1977 (“Truth and Power,” in Power/Knowledge, Ed. Colin Gordon, Pantheon, 1980). This presentation will not address whether or not political theory has yet cut off the king’s head (though discussion of this issue is welcome); rather, I will discuss why, according to Foucault, it should be done. What is the problem with thinking of power relations in terms of “law and prohibition,” in terms of sovereignty? Drawing from The History of Sexuality Volume I and some of the lectures in Society Must be Defended and Security, Territory and Population, I will distinguish between what Foucault calls “sovereign power” and “biopower,” and will explain his later understanding of power through the notion of “governmentality”. In this way I, along with those present through our discussion, will address why Foucault thought sovereignty no longer provided a useful model for analyzing power relations (at least in the mid- to late-twentieth century).

Christina Hendricks is a senior lecturer in UBC’s Philosophy department. She works predominantly on issues pertaining to ethics, sex, and gender.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Geoff Mann

6 April — 7PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 2 – Am Johal – Nomos of the Anthropocene (Media Philosophy, European Graduate School)

March 9 – Willow Verkerk (Philosophy Grad Student: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) – Antigone’s Heroism

March 16th – Carla Nappi (UBC History and STS) – Prepositioning History

March 23rd – Glen Coulthard (UBC First Nations Studies and Poli Sci) – Urbs Nullius: Gentrification and Decolonization

March 30th – Matt Hern (urban space activist, SFU and UBC Urban Studies instructor) – Land As Freedom

April 6th – Geoff Mann (SFU Geography) – Sovereignty in a Warming World

April 13th – Harsha Walia (social justice activist) – Undoing Border Imperialism

April 20th – Christina Hendricks (UBC Philosophy) – Foucault on Beheading the Sovereign

April 27th – Geoffrey Winthrop-Young (UBC CENES and Media Studies) – “A Turbine Driven by Blood”: Ernst Jünger’s “Total Mobilization” between Hitler and Heidegger

April 6th, 2015
Geoff Mann – Sovereignty in a Warming World

What might sovereignty come to mean as climate change challenges societies around the world? Widespread “progressive” support, even desperate hope, for global “agreements” might seem to suggest that the promised land of modern governance is a (“democratic”) planetary sovereign, at least in the carbon realm. However unlikely such arrangements actually are, the prospect of the uneven degradation of the planet as a global public good cannot help but put turn a magnifying glass on the content and form of modern sovereignty, even if we choose not to look through it. When we do, we find a fraught, contradictory, and unsettled set of dynamics, full of peril, but also, perhaps, full of possibility—some of which might point beyond sovereignty itself.

Geoff Mann teaches in SFU’s Geography Department.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Matt Hern

30 March — 7PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 2 – Am Johal – Nomos of the Anthropocene (Media Philosophy, European Graduate School)

March 9 – Willow Verkerk (Philosophy Grad Student: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) – Antigone’s Heroism

March 16th – Carla Nappi (UBC History and STS) – Prepositioning History

March 23rd – Glen Coulthard (UBC First Nations Studies and Poli Sci) – Urbs Nullius: Gentrification and Decolonization

March 30th – Matt Hern (urban space activist, SFU and UBC Urban Studies instructor) – Land As Freedom

April 6th – Geoff Mann (SFU Geography) – Sovereignty in a Warming World

April 13th – Harsha Walia (social justice activist) – Undoing Border Imperialism

April 20th – Christina Hendricks (UBC Philosophy) – Foucault on Beheading the Sovereign

April 27th – Geoffrey Winthrop-Young (UBC CENES and Media Studies) – “A Turbine Driven by Blood”: Ernst Jünger’s “Total Mobilization” between Hitler and Heidegger

March 30th, 2015
Matt Hern – Land As Freedom

For some time now I have been studying the Albina district of Portland, Oregon – the site of one of the most starkly racialized gentrification battles in America and currently embroiled in a well-publicized dispute over a Trader Joe’s and an empty lot. Starting there and moving through East Van, Coast Salish Territories, New Orleans, Jackson Mississippi and a few other spots, I interrogate dominant gentrification theory to connect everyday inequality to our understandings of land, ownership and wealth. I submit that considering property theory can lay some of the groundwork for understanding how contemporary divergences in wealth are accelerated and deepened – not just between individuals, but within and between places – and then how that divergence is wielded in the service of racialization, displacement and dispossession.

Even in an age of financialization and servicization capitalism remains more about land than production: constantly seeking new spaces for profit and relentlessly reterritorializing. Thus, assertions of commonality are forced to confront the conundrums of property, and ultimately, land. I hope to bring both post-development and decolonizing sensibilities to bear as I offer some ideas about both sovereignty and the commons, and what those ideas might, and should mean.

Matt lives and works in East Vancouver, Coast Salish Territories, with his partner and daughters. He has founded and directed the Purple Thistle Centre, Car-Free Vancouver Day and Groundswell Grassroots Economic Alternatives among many other community projects. His books and articles have been published on all six continents and translated into ten languages. He currently teaches in CBU’s MBA program is an Adjunct Professor in UBC’s SCARP program. He has taught at many other universities, and continues to lecture globally.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Glen Coulthard

23 March — 7PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 23rd, 2015
Glen Coulthard – Discussion and Q and A

Glen Coulthard is a member of the Yellowknives Dene First Nation and an assistant professor in the First Nations Studies Program and the Department of Political Science at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Carla Nappi

16 March — 7PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 16th, 2015
Carla Nappi – Prepositioning History

This talk is going to focus on the significance of prepositions and their linguistic relatives for thinking with, and for translating, materiality in history. We’ll approach objects as loci of proximal relationships. We’ll consider what it entails to build a historical archive that’s attentive to that approach. We’ll imagine what an art of historical composition based on such an approach would look like. And we’ll try to bring it all home with a case study from an ongoing project on Manchu bodies and the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911).

Carla Nappi is Canada Research Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of History at UBC.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Event

Dot Feature: Closing Party and Edition Launch
Raymond Boisjoly, Jeff Downer & Kyla Mallett
14 March — 4:00 PM, 2015

Please join us on Saturday, March 14th at 4:00 PM for the closing party of Dot Feature: The 2015 Artist Residency for Risograph Printing, where we will be launching new editions by the residency’s participants. Other Risographed publications, editions and materials will also be on display.

Dot Feature is the Or Gallery’s first print residency program, based around our newly acquired Risograph machine. Local and internationally based artists are invited to work with the machine over a period of several weeks to produce new risograph-printed editions.

Risograph printing uses stencil duplication, a process similar to mimeograph or silk screen. The Risograph makes a master by thermally imprinting an image onto wax paper. This master is wrapped around an ink drum, and ink is stenciled through the master onto the paper. The machine prints one colour at a time, so each additional colour in an image requires another run through the machine. The Risograph was first produced in 1986, mainly intended for use in offices. Since then they have become popular with artists, designers and publishers for their unique aesthetic.

The works produced during Dot Feature will help to fundraise for the Or Gallery’s capital project, the Programming and Residency Space. The multi-purpose space will provide affordable accommodation for visiting artists, curators and writers. It will also act as a public venue for talks and presentations, educational programs, curatorial collaborations, and symposia, and will create educational opportunities for students and emerging artists through mentorships and internships.

The residency’s first participants are Raymond Boisjoly, Jeff Downer and Kyla Mallett.

Image: new edition by Jeff Downer.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Harsha Walia

13 April — 7 PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 2 – Am Johal – Nomos of the Anthropocene (Media Philosophy, European Graduate School)

March 9 – Willow Verkerk (Philosophy Grad Student: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) – Antigone’s Heroism

March 16th – Carla Nappi (UBC History and STS) – Prepositioning History

March 23rd – Glen Coulthard (UBC First Nations Studies and Poli Sci) – Urbs Nullius: Gentrification and Decolonization

March 30th – Matt Hern (urban space activist, SFU and UBC Urban Studies instructor) – Land As Freedom

April 6th – Geoff Mann (SFU Geography) – Sovereignty in a Warming World

April 13th – Harsha Walia (social justice activist) – Undoing Border Imperialism

April 20th – Christina Hendricks (UBC Philosophy) – Foucault on Beheading the Sovereign

April 27th – Geoffrey Winthrop-Young (UBC CENES and Media Studies) – “A Turbine Driven by Blood”: Ernst Jünger’s “Total Mobilization” between Hitler and Heidegger

April 13th
Harsha Walia – Undoing Border Imperialism

This talk, based on Harsha Walia’s book by the same name (AK Press/IAS 2013), situates immigrant rights movements within a transnational analysis of capitalism, labor exploitation, settler colonialism, state building, and racialized empire. By providing the alternative conceptual frameworks of border imperialism and decolonization, this talk offers relevant insights for all grassroots and social movement organizers on effective strategies to overcome the barriers and borders within our movements in order to cultivate fierce, loving, and sustainable communities of resistance striving toward liberation.

Harsha Walia is a South Asian activist, writer, and popular educator rooted in migrant justice, Indigenous solidarity, Palestinian liberation, antiracist, feminist, anti-imperialist, and anticapitalist movements and communities for over a decade.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Willow Verkerk

9 March — 7PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 9th, 2015
Willow Verkerk – Antigone’s Heroism

A recent proliferation of feminist and post-colonial literature admires Antigone as inspiration for activist heroism: her integrity, perseverance, and capacity to sacrifice make her a venerable archetype for resistance. Antigone’s defiance of Creon and civil law as a guardian of the family and of her own moral-religious beliefs poses her as such a figure for Judith Butler. But does this use of Antigone give fair due to her tragic circumstances and familial loyalties? Jacques Lacan’s reading of the Antigone asks us to consider what is at the source of her “splendour,” to question our redeeming beautification of this self-impelled victim. I ask what is ethically salient about Antigone that makes her heroic for contemporary visions of political activism.

Recommended readings: http://classics.mit.edu/Sophocles/antigone.html
https://visrfreeschool.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/chapter3antigonesclaim.pdf

Willow Verkerk is a doctoral candidate at the Institute of Philosophy, University of Leuven, Belgium. She specializes in 19th and 20th century German and French philosophy, contemporary feminist thought, and posthumanism. Her work has appeared in Journal of Nietzsche Studies, Philosophy and Literature, Nietzsche’s Therapeutic Teaching (Bloomsbury), and Philosophy Now.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Am Johal

2 March — 7PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 2nd, 2015
Am Johal – Nomos of the Anthropocene

This talk will provide a critical introduction to new questions of sovereignty, law and jurisdiction presented by the geological epoch known as the Anthropocene. It will grapple with the question ‘who decides?’ as it relates to the current climate crisis and the movement from the present to the future.

Am Johal is Director of SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement. He completed his dissertation ‘Ecological Metapolitics: Badiou and the Anthropocene’ in 2014.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Residency

Dot Feature: 2015 Artist Residency for Risograph Printing
Raymond Boisjoly, Jeff Downer, Kyla Mallett
17 February — 14 March, 2015

Curated by Kate Noble

Dot Feature is the Or Gallery’s first print residency program, based around our newly acquired Risograph machine. Local and internationally based artists are invited to work with the machine over a period of several weeks to produce new risograph-printed editions.

Risograph printing uses stencil duplication, a process similar to mimeograph or silk screen. The Risograph makes a master by thermally imprinting an image onto wax paper. This master is wrapped around an ink drum, and ink is stenciled through the master onto the paper. The machine prints one colour at a time, so each additional colour in an image requires another run through the machine. The Risograph was first produced in 1986, mainly intended for use in offices. Since then they have become popular with artists, designers and publishers for their unique aesthetic.

The works produced during Dot Feature will help to fundraise for the Or Gallery’s capital project, the Programming and Residency Space. The multi-purpose space will provide affordable accommodation for visiting artists, curators and writers. It will also act as a public venue for talks and presentations, educational programs, curatorial collaborations, and symposia, and will create educational opportunities for students and emerging artists through mentorships and internships.

The residency’s first participants are Raymond Boisjoly, Jeff Downer and Kyla Mallett.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



curatorial-talk

Madison Killo on Beginning the Shape

31 January — 2:00PM, 2015

Please join us at the Or Gallery on Saturday, January 31st at 2:00PM for a talk by Madison Killo, curator of Beginning the Shape.

The exhibition includes works by Kristen Abdai, Mel Paget, Maya Beaudry and Scott Kemp.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



bookstore

Readings by Kegan McFadden, Nick Lakowski, Marina Roy and Anakana Schofield

24 January — 4:30 PM, 2015

Please join us at the Or Gallery on Saturday, January 24th for readings by Kegan McFadden, Nick Lakowski, Marina Roy and Anakana Schofield.

Kegan McFadden will read from the recently published artist book, he. This text uses the technique of a singular pronoun, “he”, and purposely confuses understandings of an individual protagonist, or linear narrative, by offering numerous stories of a supposed singular “he” at different stages of life. From simple delusions to very real health concerns, these pieces attempt a micro/macrocosm loosely considering themes of masculinity, failure, queerness, aging, and entropy.They are part autobiographical and part fabrication. They are meant to allude to an index, but are purposely incomplete, offering glimpses but never the whole story. His recent publications include With Alec in Mind (2012), an artist book concerning the 1995 murder of a scrap metal/junk farmer in rural Manitoba by his grandson, and the poetry chapbook, Notes from a Fog (The Vancouver Poems, 2010) about McFadden’s messy, lost years in Vancouver.

Nick Lakowski is a Vancouver based artist. He holds a BFA in studio art from Emily Carr University (2004) and an MFA in studio art from the University of British Columbia (2012). His work is grounded in a commitment to grassroots community projects, including experience as a teacher, muralist, volunteer, board member, curator, and events facilitator for a variety of local schools, businesses, festivals, DIY art spaces, and artist-run galleries. His writing explores mostly fiction, with subject matter focused on the culture of medicine, illness, disorientation, cancer, and a mystical hysteria towards resuscitation and immorality. His painting draws anxiously and humorously from the aesthetic and behavioural determinations of data visualization, psychology, and neurobiology, the world of commercial painting and paint manufacturing, various indexes and orders of colour, and the redactive/disclosive procedure of painting itself.

Marina Roy is a Vancouver-based artist and writer. Working chiefly in the areas of drawing, painting, video and animation, her artwork explores the intersection between materials, matter, natural vs. human history, and the grotesque. In 2001 she published sign after the x (Artspeak/Arsenal Pulp), an encyclopedic book which revolves around the letter X and its multiple meanings across human cultures. She is currently completing a book project titled Queuejumping. In 2010 she was recipient of the VIVO award. She is associate professor in visual art at the University of British Columbia.

Anakana Schofield writes fiction, essays, and literary criticism. Malarky, her first novel, won the Amazon.ca First Novel Award, the Debut-Litzer Prize for Fiction, was selected as a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Pick, and was shortlisted for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize. Malarky was named on sixteen different Best Books of the Year lists. Her second novel, Martin John–a footnote novel to Malarky–will be published Fall 2015 in North America.

Image: April 13 (2010) by Nick Kline. Pigment ink print from the series Boys’ Shirts.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Event

A Holiday Party & Edition Launch at the Or Gallery

Thursday December 11th — 7 - 10:30 PM, 2014

Cocktails! Editions! DJs! Fun times for all.

Launch of the new Or Gallery Risograph Edition Portfolio with prints by Lorna Brown, Aaron Carpenter, and Marina Roy.

PLUS White Columns Print Portfolio (2007)
letter-press prints by Peter Doig, Dave Muller, Adam Pendleton, and Kay Rosen.

PLUS Or Gallery editions by Stan Douglas, Ron Terada, Nicole+Ryan, Hadley+Maxwell

PLUS Fillip & New Document editions

DJ Kathy Slade! DJ Kevin Romaniuk!

Discounts on Or Bookstore books and more!

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Robert Brain

December 8 — 7PM, 2014

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s third session, which will be organized around the theme of “Aesthetics and Politics,” will be held from Sept – Dec, 2014. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period.

Though we have an operational budget of $0, the seminars will be free to the public. All professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians
Chapter 13 (Negating the Negation Faction)

December 8
Robert Brain
On Silicon Valley’s Quantified Self Movement

“The Quantified Self” is a movement organized around the individual consumer’s increasingly sophisticated capacity for digital self-surveillance of her body in terms of inputs (e.g. nutrition, air quality, etc…), affective coordinates (e.g. mood, arousal, blood oxygen levels,…), and performance levels (both mental and physical). Professor Brain will scrutinize the historical precedents and biopolitical implications of this Silicon Valley based lifestyle movement.

Bio:
Dr. Robert Brain’s research interests centre on problems of the cultural history of the sciences in the long nineteenth-century, with special foci in the relations between the sciences and the arts of modernism, the role of the sciences in modern empire and colonial expansion; evolution and the sciences of mind, brain, and behaviour; instruments and material cultures of laboratory and field; visuality and representation in the sciences; history of universal expositions, world’s fairs, and modern museums; cybernetics and media theory, cultural history of philosophy and systems of thought.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Beginning the Shape
Kristen Abdai, Maya Beaudry, Scott Kemp, Mel Paget
December 6, 2014 — January 31, 2015, 2014
Reception Friday, December 5, 8PM
Curated by Madison Killo

Morphogenesis (deriving from the Greek morphê) is a biological term used to explain the genesis of cells and cellular differentiation. It describes the process that causes an organism to develop its shape. Acting as a metaphor for artistic and curatorial production, the exhibition propagates a process of morphogenetic character. It alludes to the invisible influences that develop the shapes of forms. This genesis of form is seen as an ‘open ended becoming’ that is both nonlinear and dynamic. The works in the exhibition enter a playing field with no hierarchical divisions–they and the viewer exist as equal occupant bodies. Existing as a simulation of a body without organs, the result is a morphogenesis of a distinct experiential essence.
Including sound, video and sculpture–the works in Beginning the Shape create a singular installation. These three disciplines lend themselves to a shifting of experience and a total investment in presence. All of the works reference a method of placing the self, emphasizing perception to create a multiplicity through their unification.

Included is a video by Mel Paget that calls to being an evolution of renderings and shifting alterations through a number of softwares. Maya Beaudry’s installation shares with the viewer a constant recycling of shape through repetitive gesture, taking form again and again in tandem with the surrounding exhibition. Scott Kemp’s austere constructions shift space and place through clean-lined reappropriation, derived from the shapes found in both Paget and Beaudry’s work. Kristen Abdai’s sound piece creates a symphonic matrix with the surrounding installation, constructing and enhancing spatial awareness through its subtle presence. The echoing of the sound installation through different areas of the gallery exalts the nuances of the experience morphogenetically formed in its wake. It smoothes the fractured object that is the exhibition, as morphogenesis creates an undercurrent through the show with its culmination of immanent assemblage.

Image by Mel Paget

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Nicole Shukin

1 December — 7 PM, 2014

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s third session, which will be organized around the theme of “Aesthetics and Politics,” will be held from Sept – Dec, 2014. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period.

Though we have an operational budget of $0, the seminars will be free to the public. All professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians
Chapter 13 (Negating the Negation Faction)

December 1
Nicole Shukin
Striking Images: The Politics of Cinematic Affect

An early silent film classic – Sergei Eisenstein’s Strike (1925) – will serve as this seminar’s entry point into larger questions of aesthetics and politics. The technique of dialectical montage that Eisenstein practices in this film – exemplified by a scene in which the brutal suppression of striking factory workers is dramatically intercut with shots of a bull being stunned with a pole-axe, and then slaughtered – prompts an analysis of the politics of cinematic affect. For Eisenstein, such startling juxtapositions of images were themselves designed to strike spectators with visceral force, by-passing representation in order to directly affect viewers and move them to political action. His cinematic philosophy poses an immediate connection between aesthetics and politics that I suggest underlies how the radical relation between the two continues to be thought today.

Eisenstein’s practice of dialectical montage has received ample critical attention, and in this seminar we’ll have a chance to compare two different takes on his socialist cinema, one by Jonathan Beller in The Cinematic Mode of Production and the other by Jacques Rancière in Film Fables. Yet what I propose is at once most obvious and yet overlooked in aesthetic or biopolitical readings of Eisenstein’s cinema is the homology that Strike inadvertently implies between animal slaughter and the affective force of moving images. How exactly are animal slaughter and moving images interimplicated, and what does this interimplication signal for how a politics of species may need to be better accounted for in any aesthetic politics of equality?

Readings:

Jonathan Beller, Chapter Two (“The Spectatorship of the Proletariat”) in The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle (Dartmouth College/University Press of New England, 2006).

Jacques Rancière, “Eisenstein’s Madness,” in Film Fables (Bloomsbury Academic, 2006).

Bio:
Nicole Shukin is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Victoria, and member of the interdisciplinary graduate program in Cultural, Social, and Political Thought (CSPT). She specializes in Canadian Literature, cultural studies (with a focus on theories of biopower, animal studies, and the politics of nature), and poststructuralist, (post)Marxist, and posthumanist theory. Dr. Shukin has contributed to the edited volumes Against Automobility (Blackwell 2006) and Deleuze and Feminist Theory (Edinburgh 2000). She has published in the journals ESC, Social Semiotics, Canadian Literature, and Discourse: Journal for Theoretical Studies in Media and Culture, The Dalhousie Review and CR: The New Centennial Review.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Amy Kazymerchyk

24 November — 7 PM, 2014

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s third session, which will be organized around the theme of “Aesthetics and Politics,” will be held from Sept – Dec, 2014. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period.

Though we have an operational budget of $0, the seminars will be free to the public. All professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians
Chapter 13 (Negating the Negation Faction)

November 24
Amy Kazymerchyk
Surface Tension: Up Against a [White] Wall

In states of illness, pain, delirium or trauma, infallibility is often suspended. Perceptual and sensorial systems may distort. Emotion and intuition may become highly sensitive or muted. Cognition may slack. The capacity to view, annunciate or gesture may be halted or restrained. One’s relation to aesthetic, social and political spheres (shaken by the trembling of others) are often ruptured, or severed even. In convalescence (singular and collective), the last infallible is the wall: the bedroom wall– the hospital wall–the prison wall–the analyst’s wall–the military wall–the wall of language–the gallery wall. Surface Tension will consider experience (visual, ideological, rhetorical, reflexive, kinetic) up against these walls.

Bio:
Amy Kazymerchyk is the curator of SFU Galleries Audain Gallery. She has programmed for VIVO Media Arts Centre, the Signal + Noise Media Arts Festival, Vancouver Queer Film Festival and DIM Cinema at The Cinematheque. Amy has contributed to Artist-Run Culture in Vancouver in numerous capacities and continues to support both institutional and non-institutional artist run initiatives and projects.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Launch

Donato Mancini
New Star Books: Loitersack

Saturday, Novermber 22nd, 8:30PM

New Star Books launch

In his new book Loitersack, Donato Mancini (You Must Work Harder to Write Poetry of Excellence, Bookthug, 2012) extends his inquiry of Canadian poetry and poetics in the form of a book that contains poetry, poetics, theory and theory theatre.

In many ways a companion piece to You Must Work Harder, Loitersack works through some of the problems and questions Mancini posed in that work, a more manifest (if not traditional) work of criticism. Loitersack is in some senses a commonplace book — a scrapbook of borrowed quotations — in other senses it is the poet’s personal book of critical reflections, describing a broad topography of poetic knowledge. Like all Mancini’s work, it’s wired for explosive laughter; and as in all his previous work, Mancini sets out to write a book unlike anything else he — or anyone else, for that matter — has ever read.

The launch party will include a short poetry reading by Mr. Mancini, followed by the Vancouver premiere public reading of Mancini’s 1-act neo-absurdist play “THEQRY” (featured in Loitersack) featuring Ash Lee as OFFICER, Jesse Malakoe as DONNY, Lisa McLeod as ISADORA, and Dawn McLeod as MOTHER.

Doors open at 8:30 and the performance will begin promptly at 9:00 pm. Refreshments will be provided and books will be for sale.

More info about the book at NewStarBooks.com
more event details on Facebook

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton Street.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Jerry Zaslove

10 November — 7 PM, 2014

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s third session, which will be organized around the theme of “Aesthetics and Politics,” will be held from Sept – Dec, 2014. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period.

Though we have an operational budget of $0, the seminars will be free to the public. All professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians
Chapter 13 (Negating the Negation Faction)

*November 10
*Jerry Zaslove
“Benjamin’s ‘Litmus Test’: The Aesthetics of Violence and Culture as an ‘Enigmatic Signifier‘”

I will try to conceptualize Benjamin¹s use of violence as the State driven “enigmatic signifier” of culture that creates complicity that masks the negative of repression of violence within the rights based powerlessness of culture to arrest structural violence. The enigma of the negative of violence in modernity lies in the fear and reality of complicity with violence.

Bio:
Jerry Zaslove is a teacher and writer in the fields of Comparative Literature and Social History of Art influenced but not limited by the traditions of critical theory for the arts, aesthetics, psychoanalysis, and social thought. Most recent writing: “Kafka in the’ Penal Colony”, essays on the place of the University in society, Exile and memory, the City in History – Elsewhere and Otherwise, forms and social realities of thinking about community. Dr. Zaslove has taught at SFU since its opening year – home in English, Humanities, and as Founding Director of the Institute for the Humanities.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Samir Gandesha

3 November — 7 PM, 2014

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s third session, which will be organized around the theme of “Aesthetics and Politics,” will be held from Sept – Dec, 2014. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period.

Though we have an operational budget of $0, the seminars will be free to the public. All professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians
Chapter 13 (Negating the Negation Faction)

November 3
Samir Gandesha
“The ‘Neo-Liberal Personality’ and the Politics of Disgust”

In 2008, the global capitalist order experienced its worst crisis since October, 1987, if not, of the stock market crash and ensuing Great Depression of the 1930’s. Despite evidence that neo-liberal policies were responsible, for example, of the deregulation of financial markets, neo-liberal austerity policies continue to be rolled out in most of the advanced industrialized world. Indeed, in Britain, a key early laboratory of neo-liberalism (along with Pinochet’s Chile), austerity policies continue to exact a particularly harsh toll on the poor and much of the middle class. Far from being contested in England, however, neo-liberalism has become so normalized that, according to a recent article in the Guardian, Durham City Council has adapted the board game Monopoly to enable it to engage in public consultations to ascertain not whether further cuts to social services ought to be made but how and where such cuts ought to be carried out. Would the council make its next round of cuts to the arts or to local health-care services? Austerity, it would appear, can be participatory and fun. Neo-liberalism raises, therefore, a question posed by the Frankfurt School after “the moment to realize philosophy was missed” that is, in the aftermath of the ill-fated revolutionary reverberations throughout Europe sparked by the moment of 1917, and identified by Deleuze and Guattari, in the aftermath of May, 1968: namely, how do people come to love the conditions of their own domination? This becomes a central question for the struggle for alternatives to a social order whose current trajectory spells catastrophe on a planetary scale. As a provisional contribution towards answering this question, the talk will pose the possibility of a concept of the “neo-liberal personality.”

Bio: Samir Gandesha is the Director of the Institute for Humanities at SFU.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free