bookstore

The Magazine Buyer's Club

Starting February, 2014

Or Bookstore is excited to introduce the Magazine Buyer’s Club! Sign up to get each new issue of any of our featured periodicals.

The Buyer’s Club currently features six publications:

SAN ROCCO is a magazine about architecture written by architects.

THE EXHIBITIONIST is a journal for curators by curators.

PETUNIA is a feminist art & entertainment magazine.

TOILET PAPER is a magazine (but kind of an artists’ book) by Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari.

OCTOBER is an art criticism & theory heavyweight.

FILLIP is a journal of art, culture and ideas published in Vancouver, BC.

Membership gets you 10% off each magazine. We’ll let you know when a new issue arrives at the store, and keep it safe for you until you can stop by for it. Worldwide shipping is also available. Please drop us a line if you’d like to join!

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Science Fiction 21: The Last Frontier
Jacqueline Hoang Nguyen, Brian Jungen, Charles Stankievech
14 December 2013 — 19 February 2014,
Reception Friday 13 December, 8:00PM
Curated by Candice Hopkins

Exhibition extended to February 19

We are pleased to announce the exhibition The Last Frontier, the twenty-first installment of an 88-part science fiction series produced by the Or Gallery.

This exhibition is a vignette of sorts with three interrelated parts. It begins with a video by Jacqueline Hoang Nguyen entitled 1967: A People Kind of Place (2012) which centers on a specific point in the history of St. Paul, Alberta, a town located 300 kilometers north of Edmonton. Making use of archival film footage, in this collaged video a complex narrative regarding municipal and national policies and the contradictions inherent with the development of Canada’s multicultural act emerges. In 1967, in a gesture of radical hospitality, St. Paul inaugurated a UFO landing pad as a way to welcome the whole world including those from outer space. “The UFO landing pad”, writes Nguyen, “functions as a symbol for Canada’s increased emphasis on hospitality, tolerance, diversity, and unity at that point in history … a complex and paradoxical structural representation of both nationalist and anti-nationalist discourse”. 1967: A People Kind of Place also uncovers the colonial aspirations that led to the formation of St. Paul—the community was created for the purpose of assimilating Metis people into so-called “mainstream society”. After admitting the failure of this venture, the town dropped “des Metis” from its name. An enlarged backlit image of a 35mm slide of the original landing pad, empty and unoccupied, rests near the projected video. As the title of this exhibition suggests, science fiction and conceptions of space are oftentimes bound together with colonial aspirations.

Brian Jungen’s Modern Sculpture (After Iceland) (2005), is a set of amorphous forms—igneous lava rock from Iceland that the artist has covered in the outer skins of Nike soccer balls. The chrome-coloured leather obscures the inner forms, emphasizing the liquid nature of the molten lava. The sculptures appear as though they are suspended in motion, almost like drops of the element mercury, and like mercury they seem to exhibit the same uncanny pull towards the whole. One of the characteristics of the element is its strong attraction to other metals, including gold and silver; it will amalgamate them and create new hybrids, dissolving the other material the process.

Science fiction is rife with narratives of the extraordinary and the unexplained. Charles Stankievech’s Gravity’s Rainbow (2009) had its origins in a similar moment, when he noticed a chance apparition on the wall of his studio—a sliver of prismatic light that had refracted off of the surface of a vinyl record lying on his desk. Gravity’s Rainbow replicates something of the black magic of this initial inspiration: the work makes use of the vinyl grooves of Pink Floyd’s 12” record “Dark Side of the Moon” to produce a thin sliver of light that hovers on the wall, reminiscent of the rings of Saturn. “The installation’s soundtrack”, Stankievech explains, “is created by placing the needle of the turntable in the last groove of the record, which in turn produces a wash of white noise similar to the sound of background radiation of the cosmos as picked up from deep space radio telescopes”. Gravity’s Rainbow is accompanied by a few select objects: the album cover from the “Dark Side of the Moon”, a book entitled “THE UNIVERSE” from the Time LIFE series, and a photographic document of the orbiting light rings. The installation’s title is a nod to the serendipitous release of Pink Floyd’s generation-defining album in 1973, the same year that Thomas Pynchon’s equally influential book, “Gravity’s Rainbow”, was first published.

About the artists:

Brian Jungen lives and works in Vancouver and the Peace Country in northeastern British Columbia. He has exhibited nationally and internationally in major solo and group exhibitions. Using reclaimed materials and creating a hybridity of meaning in these objects, Jungen’s work evokes cultural traditions and points to the link between the social and environmental effects of our globalized trade in mass-produced objects. Solo exhibitions include National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C. (2010); Le Frac des Pays de la Loire, Carquefou, France (2009); Casey Kaplan, New York (2008); Museum Villa Stuck, Munich (2007); Catriona Jeffries, Vancouver (2007); and Tate Modern, London (2006).

Born and raised in Montreal, French-Canadian of Vietnamese origin, Jacqueline Hoang Nguyen is a research-based artist currently based in Brooklyn and Stockholm. Nguyen recently completed the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program (Studio 2010-2011). She obtained her MFA and a post-graduate diploma in Critical Studies at the Malmö Art Academy in Malmö, Sweden (2003-2005), and had previously completed her BFA degree with distinction at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada (1999-2003).

Amongst selected exhibitions, her work were shown internationally such as the ICA, Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia (2011); the Mason Gross Galleries in New Jersey (2011); the Galerie Im Regierungsviertel in Berlin (2010); Gasworks in London (2010), Pictura Gallery/Skånska Konstmuseum in Lund (2009), Cranbrook Museum in Cranbrook (2008), Rooseum Museum of Contemporary Art in Malmö (2005), and the Living Art Museum in Reykjavik (2004). Solo exhibitions include VOX: Centre de l’image contemporaine in Montreal (2012) and AXENEO7 in Ottawa (2013), in addition to participating in the group show The Last Laugh curated by Kari Cwynar at Apexart in New York (2013), to name a few.

Charles Stankievech, born in Okotoks, Canada, is based in Berlin, Germany. He has exhibited in venues such as Palais de Tokyo (Paris), International Symposium on Electronic Arts (ISEA2010, Germany), dOCUMENTA 13 (Kassel), Xth Biennale of Architecture (Venice), NGBK + HKW (Berlin), ISSUE Project Room (New York), Musèe d’art Contemporain Montreal, Canadian Centre for Architecture and MASSMoCA. In 2011 he was the West Coast/Yukon finalist for the Sobey Art Award. In 2012 he was artist-in-residence at Flaggfabrikken (Norway), MARFA Fieldwork International Research Program (Marfa, Texas). He has also held residencies with the Canadian Forces Artist Program, MuseumsQuartier (Vienna, Austria), Nodar Artist Residency Center (Portugal), Waterpod (NYC), Atlantic Center for the Arts (Florida), Banff Centre for the Arts, and artLAB San Servolo Artist Residency (Venice). His writings appear in academic journals such as Leonardo Music Journal (MIT Press) and 306090 (Princeton Architectural Press), as well as experimental texts in art publications. Since 2011, he has served as co-director of the art and theory press K.

About the curator:
Candice Hopkins, originally from Whitehorse, Yukon, is an independent curator and writer based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She has published extensively on history, art and vernacular architecture and has lectured at venues including Witte de With, Tate Modern and the Dakar Biennale. In 2012, she presented a keynote lecture on the topic of the “sovereign imagination” for dOCUMENTA 13. Her recent projects include Close Encounters: The Next 500 Years, a multi-site exhibition in Winnipeg co-curated with Steve Loft, Jenny Western and Lee-Ann Martin, and Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art, the National Gallery of Canada’s largest survey of contemporary art, co-curated with Greg Hill and Christine Lalonde. She is currently working with Lucia Sanroman, Irene Hoffmann and Janet Dees as co-curator of 2014 SITE Santa Fe biennial exhibition, Unsettled Landscapes, which opens on July 17th.

Special thanks to Catriona Jeffries, VOX Centre de l’image contemporaine and the Contemporary Art Gallery for their assistance with this exhibition.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Pattison
Garry Neill Kennedy
November 2 — December 7, 2013
Reception Friday, November 1, 8PM

The Or Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of Pattison, a new installation by renowned Halifax-based artist Garry Neill Kennedy.

Pattison is an evolution of the project Kennedy presented at G Gallery in Toronto and deals with his longtime interests in business culture, commercial signage, the interplay of corporate and personal identities, and the use of colour and typography indexed to portraiture. The large wall text painting combines the corporate word marks of Jim Pattison and Bob Rennie, two prominent business figures in Vancouver.

Garry Neill Kennedy is an artist, educator, and the former President of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD), Halifax. Kennedy has exhibited extensively and his work has been the subject of a major retrospective at the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa (2000). He was awarded the Portia White Prize by the Arts Council of Nova Scotia, (2000); the Governor General’s Awards in Visual and Media Arts, (2004); and invested as a Member of the Order of Canada, (2004). Recently, MIT Press invited Kennedy to author the book, The Last Art College, NSCAD (1968-1978), which chronicles the first ten years of his presidency.

Garry Neill Kennedy, Pattison (2013)

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

VISR Lecture
Sneja Gunew
December 9 — 7:00-9:00PM, 2013

Vancouver Institute for Social Research

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, theory-based free school which began in February 2013. Its intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s second session will be held from October 21, 2013 until December 9, 2013.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period. The seminar will be free to the public and all professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

As we continue into our second session, we would like to take this opportunity to open up the conversation with prospective professors and students to create a sustained para-academic platform in the city.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians – Chapter 13 (Night of the World Project – die Adlestatte faction)

The readings are posted on the VISR website:

http://visrfreeschool.wordpress.com/

Past seminars on Youtube

Oct. 21st
Logics of Violence: An Introduction

Ian Angus
SFU Humanities

I will distinguish 5 forms of violence, including discussion of the reasons for this classification and its difference from that used by other thinkers: criminality, systemic violence, metaphysical (or religious violence), revolutionary violence and the violence brought out by social disintegration. This classification will be used to suggest that each form of violence has a particular logic, such that violent events are not merely random but contain constitutive presuppositions that call for specific responses that thus generate cycles of violence. It is these cycles, or “logics of violence,” that we need to understand. Particular analysis will be given to revolutionary violence and the violence brought out by social disintegration. In conclusion, there will be some reflection on whether violence is inherent to the human condition and thereby to the possibility of non-violence.

Oct 28, 2013

Judith Roof
Rice University (Houston, TX) English

The Dangers of Homeostasis:
The Demise of the Nom-du-père

When Lacan meets Luhmann, the inevitable transcendentalism of posthumanism comes into focus. Shifting from a Freudian to a systems vocabulary offers a slightly different analysis of the stubborn resistance of structure as its binaries reemerge in renderings of the “digital,” repositionings of the paternal function, and reinscriptions of oppositional inequities. This seminar will focus on resonances from an “event” (in Badiou’s terms) or “cut” in Lacan’s in which the premise underlying metaphor (Law) disappeared, reappearing as both a silliness and paranoid knowledge. These registers operate in the same way as the hoax, patching Law with a differently-constituted mise-en-abyme.

Nov 4, 2013

Jon Beasley-Murray
UBC Spanish

“The Mexican Exception? Biopolitics, Drugs, Insurgency”

Over the past fifteen years or so, much attention has been paid to the cauldron of political experimentation that has constituted a veritable “Latin American laboratory” of social mobilization and democratic participation. From Venezuela to Bolivia, Argentina to Brazil, the old, repressive terms of the creole social contract have been challenged and renegotiated by a series of insurgencies (from the Caracazo to the Bolivian gas wars) and their respondent institutional forms (from chavismo to the MAS). Even Colombia, otherwise often the lone holdout when it comes to good news from the South, has seen novel forms of political participation and governance on the local and municipal scale, as well as moves towards a possible end to its long-running civil war.

The exception, seldom discussed in the same breath, is Mexico. Though the Mexicans have had their movements of social mobilization and radicalism, from the Zapatistas to López Obrador’s presidential campaign, any sober assessment has to admit that the country’s situation is dire and deteriorating. Violence associated with the drugs trade has led to the death of literally tens of thousands, at a rate faster and more devastating than any similar violence that the region experienced over the course of what was hardly a particularly pacific twentieth century. Despite the fact that this violence is in part a response to an increasingly assertive (and militarized) state presence at its periphery, in effect we see the state’s reach and the strength of its claims dramatically shrinking.

All this takes place in conditions of near silence and much ignorance, largely because of the breakdown of mechanisms of representation, as the press has been intimidated and essentially forced to take a blind eye to proceedings while international opinion has been largely indifferent. Yet because of the threat that the situation poses both the state and the institutions of what used to be known as civil society, it has all the hallmarks of a social insurgency, if without any promise of liberation or redemption. And international indifference is foolhardy given that Mexico is perhaps showing the way towards a new biopolitical terrain whose savagery, driven by the desire for profit (and death), is hitherto unknown in the annals of capitalism. And it may turn out to be not so exceptional after all…

This paper examines some of the practical and theoretical issues that the so-called Mexican exception raises.

Nov 11, 2013
Bo Earle
UBC English

Positive Terror: Hegel, Liberalism and Noir Aesthetics

The account that modern liberal capitalism, following Adam Smith, offers of its own history is one of emancipation, of the progressive disencumbering of atomic Cartesian subjects whose rational self-interest is fortuitously mitigated by the sympathetic imagination to the collective benefit of society at large. The otherwise inexplicable good fortune that individual liberty should be so conscientiously self-correcting Smith illustrates by citing the capacity of the bourgeois subject to imaginatively rehearse the suffering of a derelict lunatic he happens upon in the street. For Smith, self-interested rationality is corrected by its capacity to imagine its own negation. My talk introduces the alternative account of modern liberalism offered in G.W.F. Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Anticipating current influential reflections on the ethical implications of terror by figures such as Baudrillard, Sloterdijk and Zizek, Hegel does not dispute Smith’s reading of liberalism’s self-conception but offers a more expansive account of what is functionally entailed by the act of negation. The bourgeois subject stages its own negation as a spectacle that implicitly reaffirms its claim to an unencumbered, sovereign perspective. Empathy then can be seen less as mitigating possessive self-interest than fostering it, and modern liberal subjects less as mutually beneficent than mutually exclusive. Hegel deconstructs Smith’s conclusion simply by recognizing such violently antagonistic individualism for what it is, contending that terror, radically indiscriminate negation, both in the case of the French Revolution and in general, is not a contingent consequence but the essential purpose of democratic revolution and liberal progressivism generally.

A classic study of modern liberalism, Isaiah Berlin’s “Two Concepts of Liberty,” contrasts what he terms the “negative” freedom to be left alone, unencumbered and free to do whatever one happens to choose, and the “positive” freedom to pursue certain specific goods or purposes. As an ethical norm applied in the here and now, Berlin concludes that negative freedom is empty, denying real acts the kind of concrete aims they require but that only positive conceptions of freedom provide. Analogously, Hegel’s and Smith’s conceptions of liberal self-negation might be contrasted in terms of positive and negative conceptions of terror. Smith’s image of the lunatic, like negative conceptions of encumbrances to be removed, is merely one among many arbitrary examples of unfreedom that, in themselves indifferent, together confirm possession of an unencumbered perspective and of a potential for future action that escapes all such limits. Hegel treats terror not as an arbitrary object of knowledge but a singularly traumatic practical experience, symptomized aesthetically by metaphors that liken bloodletting to drinking water and beheading to cutting cabbages. Negation of Cartesian sovereignty is concretely felt effect of properly grasping such metaphors, not an edifyingly removed spectacle. Such sovereignty retains a crucial role in Hegel’s positive conception of terror; not the role of an ideologically presumed reality, but the role of a fantasy by which the real practice of modern violence is structured and haunted.

To flesh out a picture of what a liberal ethics would entail that acknowledged rather than suppressed its implication in terror, I will chart a brief history of noir aesthetics from Baudelaire’s alternative stagings of Smith’s street encounter to classical examples of film noir.

Nov 18, 2013
Geoffrey Winthrop-Young
UBC Central, Eastern, Northern European Studies

Avoid the Breath You Take: Peter Sloterdijk’s Terror from the Air

Virginia Woolf famously observed that ‘on or about December 1910 human character changed.’ The claim is both too modest and imprecise. Peter Sloterdijk — arguably the most stimulating, certainly the most controversial German philosopher — knows better. The epochal turn occurred close to the Belgian town of Ypres, on April 22, 1915, at around 5:00 PM, when the German army launched the first deadly gas attack. For Sloterdijk, this targeting of the body’s immediate environment rather than the body itself is not only a matter of military history, it dramatically highlights the key feature of the modern age: the ongoing practical and theoretical ‘explication’ of our enabling environments. Explication involves becoming aware of (and experiencing) supporting infrastructures that had long remained below the thresholds of perception. And you are never more aware of your necessity to breathe than when the very breath you take threatens to kill you. Ypres, Auschwitz, Dresden, Hiroshima and all their current successors are the ‘atmoterrorist’ equivalent of equally far-ranging scientific and artistic endeavours that characterize modernity. The structural opposite of gas warfare is the art of climate control and air conditioning. Both speak of a fundamental realignment in the ongoing intertwinedness between humans and their spaces; though to use gas war as example to discuss this development is, no doubt, a bit like explaining the principles of gravity by describing what happens to human bodies when they are thrown off a cliff.

The events of Ypres are featured in the beginning of Sloterdijk’s Terror from the Air (2009), first published as Luftbeben: An den Quellen des Terrors (literally, “Airquakes: At the Sources of Terror”) in 2002 and then again in 2004 as an introductory chapter of Schäume (“Foams”), the third volume of Sloterdijk’s trilogy Spheres. Much as the gas attack launched the Second Battle of Ypres, Terror from the Air introduces a much broader argument that brings to a close Sloterdijk’s ambitious anthropotechnical spherology. A lot can and must be said about the conceptualization of terror and terrorism in Terror from the Air (a titillating title designed to disappoint readers expecting insights into 9/11), but a lot must also be said about the philosophical, historical and biographical undergrowth of Sloterdijk’s ideas. The presentation will touch on both book and backgrounds.

Reading: Peter Sloterdijk, Terror from the Air

November 25th, 2013
Laura U Marks
SFU School for the Contemporary Arts

Aromatic Events: how plant communication makes us more than human

Plants communicate to other plants, to insects, and to animals, in many fascinating ways. We humans can cultivate our latent plant nature by trying to understand what the plants are doing. Our acts of fear and self-protection resemble those of plants and rely on plant resources; and many of the reasons we experience beauty and pleasure arise from the way plants evolved to attract pollinators. The philosophers C.S. Peirce, A.N. Whitehead, and Elizabeth Grosz will support my inquiry, as well as recent findings from plant biochemistry. To help us cultivate our plantlike qualities I will distribute olfactory items.

Dec 2, 2013:
Gareth James
UBC Art History and Visual Art Department
Description to follow

Dec 9, 2013
Sneja Gunew
UBC English and Gender Studies

Fighting Globalization with a Cosmopolitanism Yet to Come.
Sneja Gunew, University of British Columbia

Whether through global warming, economic turbulence, or acute awareness of conflict zones on the daily news, the world is currently experiencing its acute inter-connection in many aspects. But what are the conceptual terms that can help us understand this everyday reality? While we have become all too familiar with the increasing social inequalities that appear to be inherent to globalization, recent debates in cosmopolitanism offer an approach that, in the words of sociologist Gerard Delanty, creates “a condition of openness to the world … entailing self and societal transformation.” The literary critic Berthold Schoene suggests that “to call oneself a cosmopolitan involves … opening oneself up to a radical unlearning of all definitive modes of identification.” While traditional cosmopolitanism is associated with alienated mobile elites and their consumption habits the new debates over the last decade attempt to create a sense of global interconnection that perceives all cultures, groups and individuals as contributing to world knowledge. The cosmopolitan debates help generate a cultural legibility that links individuals across group identities and beyond national ties to embrace diasporic connections. For example, the term ‘vernacular cosmopolitanism’ (coined by postcolonial critic Homi Bhabha) acknowledges the global interdependence identified by the new debates in cosmopolitanism at the same time that it recognizes that these are always rooted in and permeated by local concerns attached to minority groups competing within the nation—a complex politics that includes Indigeneity. What might this new legibility comprise and to what degree does reading world literatures (and cultural texts) in new ways help us comprehend this new cosmopolitan grammar?

Contact – visrvancouver@gmail.com

Venue is wheelchair accessible.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



fundraiser

Bricks & Mortar
Vancouver Rowing Club, 450 Stanley Park Drive
Friday October 18, 6PM, 2013,

Cocktails & Preview:
Wednesday, October 16, 5-9PM
Or Gallery
555 Hamilton Street

Tickets/ $175
Tables of 10/ $1500
available at
auction.orgallery.org
or call 604.683.7395

Online auction by Paddle 8
Please visit paddle8.orgallery.org
to view auction pieces, and bid online.

Works By:
Brian Jungen, Allison Hrabluik, Jason McLean, Geoffrey Farmer, Annika Rixen, Roy Arden, Steven Brekelmans, Rodney Graham, Ian Wallace, Kyla Mallett, Laiwan, Marina Roy, Kota Ezawa, Mark Soo, Una Knox, Neil Wedman, Sydney Hermant, Hadley+Maxwell, Kathy Slade, Laura Piasta, Aaron Carpenter, Antonia Hirsch, Elizabeth Zvonar, Duane Linklater, Shannon Oksanen, Myfanwy MacLeod, Garry Neill Kennedy, Kathleen Ritter, Nicole Ondre, Luanne Martineau, Angus Ferguson, and more.

2013 marks the 30th anniversary of the Or Gallery. This significant milestone provides the opportunity to reflect on the Or’s venerable history as a space for experimental art practices, and to bring an ambitious new project to light.

The Or Gallery is raising funds to purchase a residency and studio space that will provide a flexible programming venue for talks, readings and open studios. The project reflects an early moment in the gallery’s history: from 1983—1987, the gallery’s Franklin Street location featured an adjoining apartment, allowing a succession of artists to live in the space and curate exhibitions and projects. Building on this history, the multipurpose residency space will host visiting artists, curators and writers for short or long-term stays.

The success of Vancouver’s art community has hinged on tremendous local talent, bolstered by its ability to engage with art communities beyond the city walls. This project will supplement the Or Gallery’s programming and be shared with our peer organizations, providing an important asset to welcome a large number of visitors to work in Vancouver and establish lasting connections in the city.

You can become involved. We are raising money to match $100,000 in funds generously promised by the City of Vancouver, and we need your help! Please consider attending our auction, purchasing artwork, or donating online now.

Donate to the Or Gallery now:
orgallery.org/membership

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Launch

On Labour: Ginger Goodwin Way & Night Shift LP

October 5, 7PM — 9:30PM, 2013

In conjunction with the Vancouver Art / Book Fair, Or Bookstore is pleased to launch two new publications by Or Gallery. The launch will take place at Or Bookstore, 555 Hamilton Street.

Ginger Goodwin Way is a book, edited by Jesse Birch, featuring essays by the late Jim Green, Jesse Birch and Michael Turner. The book also documents the 2010 exhibition of the same name at the Or, which featured work by Mariana Castillo Deball, Michele Di Menna, and Until We Have A Helicopter, with texts by Adam Sellen, Eric Bell, and Raymond Boisjoly. Ginger Goodwin Way was an exhibition of contemporary art that engaged with contested stories and histories: re-interpretations, misinterpretations and unofficial versions.

Jesse Birch and Michael Turner will read selections from their essays. Ginger Goodwin Way is printed and bound by Publication Studio Vancouver.

Night Shift is a 12” vinyl record by Brady Cranfield and Jamie Hilder, which documents the artists’ 2012 performance and installation at the Or Gallery. In response to the idea that titanium dioxide, the primary ingredient in white paint, is used as an indicator of economic recovery, the artists painted the walls of the gallery white every night for the duration of the exhibition. As the title implies, the artists’ labour took place at night while the gallery was closed and was performed for an amount of time equal to the gallery’s regular business hours. Several microphones recorded the sounds of the painting and were played back during the day while the gallery was open to the public. Over the course of the exhibition, as paint builds up on the wall, these sounds also accrued after each night’s work, with each subsequent track layered on top of the previous night’s recordings. Liner notes by Andrew Witt.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Plänterwald
Lynne Marsh
September 7 — October 12, 2013
Reception Friday, September 6, 8PM
Curated by Mark Lanctôt and Jonathan Middleton

Shot in an abandoned former GDR amusement park located just outside of Berlin, Plänterwald is a film about the gradual processes of decay and overgrowth. By choosing as subject a forgotten place of leisure that to this day remains gated and guarded by security guards, Lynne Marsh draws a telling parallel between the spaces of spectacle, of control and of Nature. The passage of time, as indicated by how submerged in foliage the corroding site has become, turns the fun park into a sylvan pastoral.

Captured in the process of returning to nature, the site still retains the human presence of security guards, what the artist has called “guardians of a ‘dead’ space.” As they patrol a place with no clear use or value, they become representatives of corporate law and order that offers protection without preservation. They stand idly by as the object of their surveillance slowly disappears under rampant vegetation. Is this what an eventually depleted future holds in store? Abandoned sites whose guardians, like soldiers cut off from communication lines at the end of a war, are unaware that the old order has fallen?

Plänterwald marks the first of a series of exhibitions and projects curated by Mark Lanctôt and Jonathan Middleton under the title The Troubled Pastoral. The series takes on a broad set of themes including pessimism, psychedelia, altered states and drug use, black comedy, science-fiction dystopia, class struggle (within the context of an increasingly marginal or absent middle class), the industrialization of food production, the ragged edge of suburbia, and various forms of visual, aural, or perceptual interference, including smoke, static, and electro-magnetic radiation.

A reception will also be held in conjunction with SWARM 14 on the evening of Friday, September 13th, from 7PM.

Lynne Marsh, Plänterwald (2010)Lynne Marsh, Plänterwald (2010)

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Death & Objects II
Emilie Halpern, Neil Goldberg, Ryan Peter, Jasmine Reimer, Major G.L. Thorton Sharp
May 25 — July 13,
Reception Friday, May 24, 8PM
Curated by Eric Fredericksen & Jonathan Middleton

The Or Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of Death & Objects II, an exhibition featuring works by Neil Goldberg, Emilie Halpern, Ryan Peter, Jasmine Reimer and Major G.L. Thornton Sharp. The exhibition takes up similar themes as Death & Objects, an exhibition at the Or Gallery that touched on the contemporary memento mori and vanitas, including subtle or abstract anthropomorphisms related to sculpture and the still life.

Death & Objects II takes a more direct approach. Works effect a one-to-one relationship in many cases and otherwise address scale and measurement. From Emilie Halpern’s Drown, a puddle of seawater equivalent to the capacity of human lungs, to the sculpture by Jasmine Reimer incorporating casts of cauliflower and the studio floor, the works are indexed to the physical world. Ryan Peter’s photogram series Untitled (AUTOGRAM), portrays what appear to be arms, legs, and other figurative elements against a series of hostile and psychedelic landscapes. While we understand these to be pictures, as with all photograms, they were created by placing objects directly on the photo paper. The title of the series conveys an additional interest in the self-descriptive.

Neil Goldberg’s My Father Breathing Into a Mirror (2005) is what it says. In a one-minute-long looping video, shot in a park with fall leaves, the artist’s father proves, over and over, that he is still breathing. The document’s irony—a proof that is unproven as soon as it is recorded, and thus past—preceded the father’s passing but is deepened by it.

Major G.L. Thornton Sharp’s Victory Square Cenotaph (1924) was erected by public subscription as a monument to Canadian dead of the Great War. Cenotaphs—monuments in the form of a tomb—were erected as war memorials in many Canadian cities in the wake of Edwin Lutyens’ influential 1919 Cenotaph in Whitehall., London. Sharp’s Cenotaph takes the odd form of a truncated obelisk, triangular in plan to suit the shape of the surrounding square. Its inscription, drawn from Lamentations 1:12, is remarkably in-your-face in its address. Walking south across the park from the Or, you read “IS IT NOTHING TO YOV.” If the direct address is not clear enough, the next face clarifies its object: “ALL YE WHO PASS BY.” Finally, the main face, toward Cambie, declares “THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR EVERMORE,” though no names bedeck the monument—a clear difference between it and more contemporary monuments. Its anachronistic insistence on giving death a collective meaning and its retention in collective memory is striking today, while its paradoxical form—not quite cenotaph, not quite obelisk—would have pleased late-20th century postmodern architects. For the purposes of the current exhibition at the Or, we simply underline its transitive function: a monument representing a singular tomb, but standing at the head of no grave, insisting through its formal aspect and its hortatory engravings the reality of mass sacrifice and the necessity of its remembrance.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Screening

James Benning, Michael Snow
Clamour and Toll: Films
March 18th, 7:30pm

Curated by Eli Bornowsky

NOTE: Screenings are held at DIM Cinema at the Pacific Cinémathèque Pacifique at 1131 Howe St.
Screenings are 18yrs+
Tix $11/$9+ $3membership
thecinematheque.ca
dimcinema.ca

James Benning
Twenty Cigarettes, USA 2011. HD, 99 mins.

Michael Snow
New York Eye and Ear Control, Canada 1964. 16mm, 34 mins.

Produced in partnership with DIM Cinema and the Pacific Cinémathèque.

There is an operation in certain works of art where the hierarchy of the composition is unclear, offering the viewer the agency to compose her interpretation of the work experientially. We could call this operation something like subjective-manoeuvring. Ultimately it is the experience of freedom. I first experienced this through listening to music; however, because the operation is formal and perceptual, it is not medium specific. It also operates in great films, from Tarkovsky to Tati. It also informs my practice as a painter.

With this in mind, Clamour and Toll contrasts the austerity of James Benning’s Twenty Cigarettes with the cacophony of Michael Snow’s New York Eye and Ear Control. It may seem unusual to contrast free jazz bohemianism in New York with straight prairie portraits, but the contrast in content and context illustrates one strategy to facilitate subjective-manoeuvring that I prize: discord.
I admire these two artists and these rigorous films because they present a challenge: they are difficult to watch. But this difficulty only presents a challenge to how we think about looking. For if we really look, the freedom we experience far surpasses the discomfort.

Total approximate running time: 133 mins.

Clamour and Toll is an ongoing series of performance, sound art, and moving images. Each event explores the relation between sensation and intellection of contrasting artistic mediums and experimental practices.


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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

After Finitude:
Neil Campbell, Hanne Darboven, Nicole Ondre, Cheyney Thompson
23 February - 20 April, 2013
Opening February 22, 8PM
Curated by Eli Bornowsky

“I decided to create a show in the same fashion that I would paint a picture.

At first I was thinking of symmetry and began drawing diagrams. If Ondre’s work was positioned in the exact middle point between Thompson and Campbell the symmetry would be maintained, but I was sure her work could easily shift to one side or the other. Further, the diagram was only symmetrical if Thompson and Campbell’s work were envisioned as the same shape (dots), and that, I was certain, could not be the case. This was an exciting observation because it meant that I could expand my two-dimensional model into a three or four-dimensional model. With these new dimensions, I could activate the negative space of my diagrams with Darboven’s musical work.

Ultimately I was designing a collection of four artistic worlds that spanned the relation between sensation and intellection. A generic tension, but generic in the sense that it could encourage us to say something like “art and human experience”. Existential! I like being alive; experience is what we are made for. How do we think about our sensations? How do we sense ourselves thinking?…”

Download the full exhibition text

See the Exhibition Teaser

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Performance

Ian Wyatt, Lief Hall, MASS MARRIAGE, Lauryn Youden Clamour and Toll: Dreams

February 16
Curated by Eli Bornowsky

7:30pm
Free

Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre,
Goldcorp Centre for the Arts
149 W. Hastings St.

PREVIEW S L O W R I F F S

The Or Gallery is pleased to present Clamour and Toll: Dreams in collaboration with SFU Woodward’s and SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement.

An evening of sound and image, Clamour and Toll: Dreams presents a selection of refined audio-visual performances. From harsh and austere through the spectrum to the brightest rainbow, each solo performer will create an immersive world of improvised sound and projected video. Prepare for an abstract dream, and a surreal revelation. This is the third event in an ongoing series curated by the Vancouver painter Eli Bornowsky, for the Or Gallery. Each event positions sound art in relation to other mediums, exploring the relation between sensation and intellection.

Ian Wyatt is a Vancouver/Montreal based artist and graduate of Emily Carr University. He is a DJ and collaborator with Vancouver’s Mood Hut collective and has been an instrumental force in recording and touring with the experimental pop group No Gold. For Clamour and Toll, Wyatt will debut a new iteration of his rigorous and meditative Slow Riffs project. Influenced by Terry Riley, the techno of Basic Channel and the paintings of Agnes Martin, Wyatt’s work addresses constellations within the body-mind, creating interior spaces using sustained aural forms and gestures.

Lief Hall is a graduate from the Emily Carr University with a degree in animation. Her work often includes elaborate costumes, improvised vocals, and psychedelic visuals that push notions of genre, identity, and accessibility. She has collaborated as a vocalist with Jeffrey Allport and Robert Pederson under the name Glaciers and was lead singer for the experimental punk band Mutators. Her multi-media work has been presented across Canada and her performance work has expanded to include large theatrical productions including Paper House and The Golden Dawn: MYTHS Electronic Opera (Performed at SFU Woodward’s in 2012). Hall is one half of the electro-noise duo Myths, who recently toured North America with Grimes and Elite Gymnastics.

Melissa Paget is a multi-disciplinary media artist whose abrasive sound and video works fall under the moniker MASS MARRIAGE. Paget’s work envisions a manic character obsessed with female identity from high fashion to the female body in popular culture, to prostitution, all embroiled in a world of bizarre European genre cinema. These fixations are appropriated by Paget from various media sources and heavily processed into vivid, concentrated, abstract and abrasive sound and video, often accompanied by her live amplified vocals. Recent performances include Victoria Noise Fest, Vancouver Noise Fest, and Pure Harsh Noise Worship in Portland, Oregon. She has collaborated with noise artist the RITA and released limited edition cassette recordings on the Absurd Exposition and Isolated Now Waves labels.

Lauryn Youden is a recent graduate in photography from Emily Carr University and works in Vancouver and Berlin. Stretching the limits of her photographic discipline, Youden uses video to document the material properties of simple objects. The resulting abstract footage is used to create large-scale videos for screening and installation. Some of these works will punctuate the performances of Clamour and Toll. She is cofounder of Vancouver’s experimental video gallery Ecke.

Eli Bornowsky is a Vancouver based painter. He is an MFA candidate at Bard College, New York, and Program Manager for the Or Gallery. Clamour and Toll represents his ongoing interest in sound and it’s relation to art and human experience.

Image by Mel Paget.

slowriffs.com
liefhall.com
massmarriage.tumblr.com
Lauryn Youden
orgallery.org
elibornowsky.com

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Project

Science Fiction 20 at Supermarket 2013, Stockholm
Aaron Carpenter, Hadley+Maxwell, Peter Gazendam, Laura Piasta, Cauleen Smith
15 - 17 February, 2013

The Or Gallery is pleased to present the 20th iteration of its Science Fiction series for the Supermarket Art Fair 2013 (Stockholm), featuring the work of Aaron Carpenter (Vancouver), Hadley+Maxwell (Berlin), Peter Gazendam (Vancouver), Laura Piasta (Vancouver), and Cauleen Smith (Chicago).

Science Fiction 20 extends a conversation on subjectivity within the context of speculation and memory articulated in Science Fiction 18: The Future from Memory (Vancouver, 2012), taking on additional themes of pedagogy and personal history.

This project is the latest exhibition in its series of 88 Science Fiction related exhibitions planned over a 260 year period, and the third project the Or Gallery has produced in Sweden.

3rd floor, Kulturhuset, located in the city centre of Stockholm

Exhibition by 88 artist-run galleries and other initiatives from 33 countries. Performance art, talks and panel discussions.

Hours:
Friday 11am–10pm
Saturday 11am–8pm
Sunday 11am–6pm

SUPERMARKET – Stockholm Independent Art Fair 2013:
1646, The Hague, The Netherlands | 2B Gallery, Budapest, Hungary | A.M.180 collective, Prague, Czech Republic | ALISN, London, United Kingdom | Alpineum Produzentengalerie, Lucerne, Switzerland | Ars Auttoinen, Auttoinen, Finland | Art Lab Gnesta, Gnesta, Sweden | Art On Armitage, Chicago, United States | Artellewa Art Space, Cairo, Egypt | Artists’ Association of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland | Ateljén Hea, Sunne, Sweden | blank projects, Cape Town, South Africa | Blue Oyster, Dunedin, New Zealand | Candyland, Stockholm, Sweden | CFF – Centrum för fotografi, Stockholm, Sweden | CirkulationsCentralen, Malmö, Sweden | DIENSTGEBÄUDE Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland | Duplex100m2, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina | Ed Video Media Arts Centre, Guelph, Canada | Espacio Tangente, Burgos, Spain | Evil Son, Cape Town, South Africa | Formverk (art zone), Eskilstuna / Banatska Dubica, Sweden / Serbia | fragment S, Seoul, South Korea | Galeria Szara, Cieszyn, Poland | Galleri Box, Gothenburg, Sweden | Galleri Konstepidemin, Gothenburg, Sweden | Galleri Maskinen, Umeå, Sweden | Galleri Se Konst, Falun, Sweden | Galleri Syster, Luleå, Sweden | Galleri Verkligheten, Umeå, Sweden | Galleria Huuto, Helsinki, Finland | Galleria Sculptor, Helsinki, Finland | Gocart Gallery, Visby, Sweden | GRAD, Belgrade, Serbia | Grafiska Sällskapet / The Swedish Printmakers’Association, Stockholm, Sweden | Green Is Gold, Copenhagen, Denmark | Grimmuseum, Berlin, Germany | Gudran Association for Art and Development, Alexandria, Egypt | Heavy Merry Finland, Rotterdam / Helsinki, Netherlands / Finland | HMK {Hotel Maria Kapel}, Hoorn, the Netherlands | ID:I Galleri, Stockholm, Sweden | IS-projects, Leiden, Netherlands | JCA DE KOK, The Hague, Netherlands | Kallio Kunsthalle, Helsinki, Finland | Kings ARI, Melbourne, Australia | Konstnärshuset, Stockholm, Sweden | Kultivator, Dyestad, Sweden | Le Cube – independent art room, Rabat, Morocco | Lo and Behold, Athens, Greece | Margaris Foundation / les yper yper, Thessaloniki, Greece | microwesten, Berlin / Munich, Germany | Milkshake Agency, Geneva, Switzerland | MUU galleria, Helsinki, Finland | Nationalgalleriet, Stockholm, Sweden | Nest, The Hague, Netherlands | Office d’Art Contemporain, Brussels, Belgium | Or Gallery, Vancouver, Canada | pietmondriaan.com, Rotterdam, Netherlands | rainbowartsproject, Singapore/Indonesia, Singapore/Indonesia | Sant Marc, Sineu, Mallorca, Spain | Studio 44, Stockholm, Sweden | Superclub Gallery and Studios, Edinburgh, United Kingdom | T-Gallery, Bratislava, Slovakia | t.act presented by KUNSTtransit, multiple countries | Tegen2, Stockholm, Sweden | The M( )esum, Berlin, Germany | The Museum of Forgetting, Norrköping, Sweden | Toolbox, Berlin, Germany | Totaldobze, Riga, Latvia | TPTP, Transient Projects To People, Paris, France | Tupajumi foundation, Rotterdam, Netherlands | ZeroStation, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam | Zeta Galeri, Tirana, Albania | Zona, Szczecin, Poland | Ў gallery, Minsk, Belarus | | KKV – Konstnärernas Kollektivverkstad i Nacka, Sweden | Konstkonsulenterna i Sverige, Sweden | Konstnärernas Hjälpfond, Stockholm, Sweden | Konstnärscentrum Öst, Stockholm, Sweden | Konstperspektiv, Stockholm, Sweden | KRO/KIF, Stockholm, Sweden | Kulturtidskriften Cora, Stockholm, Sweden | LMDP, L’autre Moitié Du Palais, Paris, France | Mondo Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway | NKF / Nordic Art Association Finland, Helsinki, Finland | NKF / Nordic Art Association Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden | Sveriges Konstföreningar, Limhamn, Sweden | Tidskriften Hjärnstorm, Stockholm, Sweden

Peter GazendamHadley+Maxwell, Lehrkoerper

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Project

Vancouver Institute for Social Research

February 4 — April 18, 2013

Vancouver Institute for Social Research

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research ( VISR ) is an independent, para-academic, theory-based free school initiating in 2013. Its intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute will be launching a 9-week pilot project in February 2013 and ending on April 1st. Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting nine different professors to present on topics of their choice over this period. The seminar will be free to the public and all professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

As we inaugurate this initial phase, we would like to take this opportunity to open up the conversation with prospective professors and students to create a sustained para-academic platform in the city.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians – Chapter 13 (Infinite Judgement Society – Owl of Minerva faction)

The readings will be on our Wordpress site:
http://visrfreeschool.wordpress.com/

The schedule for this initial pilot project will be as follows:

Feb. 4th – Glen Coulthard – Rage against Empire: Resentment, Reconciliation and Indigenous Decolonization in Canada

On June 11, 2008, the Conservative Prime Minister of Canada, Stephen J. Harper, issued an official apology on behalf of the Canadian state to Indigenous survivors of the Indian residential school system (IRSS). Characterized as the inauguration of a “new chapter” in the history of Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal relations in the country, the residential school apology was a highly anticipated and emotionally loaded event. Across the country, Native and non-Native people alike gathered in living rooms, band offices, churches, and community halls to witness and pay homage to this so-called “historic” occasion. Although there was a great deal of Native scepticism toward the apology in the days leading up to it, in its immediate aftermath it appeared that many, if not most, observers felt that Harper’s apology was a genuine and necessary “first step” on the long road to forgiveness and reconciliation.

The benefit of the doubt originally afforded the Prime Minister regarding the authenticity of his apology has since waned. Public distrust began to escalate following a well-scrutinized address by Harper at a gathering of the G20 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on September 25, 2009. It was there that Harper made the somewhat astonishing (but typically arrogant and self-congratulatory) claim that Canadians had “no history of colonialism.” Harper continued: “[W]e have all of the things that many people admire about the great powers but none of the things that threaten or bother them.” This seminar will explore some of the issues raised by these two seemingly contradictory events and how they speak to the current entanglement of settler-colonialism with the politics of reconciliation that began to gain traction in Canada during the 1990s.

Readings:
Glen Coulthard, “Subjects of Empire: Indigenous Peoples and the ‘Politics of Recognition’ in Canada” Contemporary Political Theory 6:4 (2007).
Thomas Brudholm, “Revisiting resentments: Jean Amery and the dark side of forgiveness and reconciliation,” Journal of Human Rights 5:1 (2006).

Biography: Glen Coulthard teaches political theory and Indigenous politics in the First Nations Studies Program and the Department of Political Science at UBC. He is a member of the Yellowknives Dene First Nation.

February 11 – Hilda Fernandez – Introduction to Jacques Lacan

Jacques Lacan (1901-1981) was an innovative French psychoanalyst who opposed the dogmatic practice of psychoanalysis in his time and stated the imperious need to return to the essence of Freud’s teaching, centred in language. By reclaiming the “return to Freud”, he re-established the ethics of the analytical act and orchestrated an epistemic movement in the psychoanalytical field that created a new school within this field.

Influenced by thinkers of diverse fields, such as Spinoza, Hegel, Heidegger, Saussure, Levy-Strauss and Cantor, Lacan’s teaching spread over 50 years and his transmission was mainly oral throughout his numerous seminars. After more than 6 decades, Lacan has significantly influenced not only the therapeutic practice of psychoanalysis but many other disciplines such as literature, art criticism, political science, geography, film studies and feminist studies, to name a few.

Lacan’s style is often considered difficult, hermetic and “baroque”. In this workshop we will introduce the student to Lacan’s oeuvre, situating the context and the influences of his work, as well as mapping each concept in relation to the rest of his work. We will introduce the student to the following themes:
1. The three registers – Real, Imaginary and Symbolic – in the subjective experience.
2. “The unconscious is structured as a language”: This aphorism related to the dyad of signifier/signified and the creation of historical meaning.
3. Desire, Drives and Jouissance
4. Sexual difference
5. On Clinical structures: Neurosis (Hysteria, Obsession, Phobia), Perversion and Psychosis.
6. Ethics of the Clinical Act: Transference, symptom, time,

Suggested Readings:
JACQUES LACAN
My Teaching (1967-1968)
Radiophonie (1970) http://web.missouri.edu/~stonej/Radiophonie.pdf

Optional:
JACQUES-ALAIN MILLER
“A” and “a” in Clinical Structures.
Transl. by Stuart Schneiderman in Acts of the Paris-New York Psychoanalytic Workshop, 1987, pp. 14-29, The Symptom 6, Spring 2005. http://www.lacan.com/symptom6_articles/miller.html
The Symptom: Knowledge, Meaning and the Real. transl. by Daniel Collins in The Symptom 7 (Spring 2006) http://www.lacan.com/symptom7_articles/miller.html

Feb. 18th – Clint Burnham – Does the Internet have an Unconscious?

In this seminar I propose to use the tools and concepts of psychoanalysis to address contemporary internet cultures, focusing on the concept of the unconscious. I will begin with Freud’s writings on the unconscious in The Interpretation of Dreams (1899) and his various technical and metapsychological papers (including “The Unconscious” [1915], “Observations on Love in Transference” [1915], “Fetishism” [1927], and “Negation” [1925]). For Freud, the unconscious is both the repository of repressed traumas and desires and the source of symptoms, of uncontrolled actions.

But when Freud is revised by Lacan, in his seminars and the texts collected in Écrits (1966), the unconscious is now, on the one hand, “structured like a language” (or subject to the binary logic of signifier and signified, and read by Lacan very much in a way that emphasizes the role of puns, translation, and metaphor and metonymy), but also “ex-timate,” outside the subject, located in the big Other of the Law and the Nom de père (the name of the father but also the no of the father – and, les non-dupes errent , or the non-duped make mistakes). Lacan’s unconscious is not interior, not primordial, but exterior, and social.

Continuing with this very particular trajectory of psychoanalysis (the Lacanian tradition, let us say), Slavoj Žižek’s unconscious is now a formulation that has to do with the “obscene underside” of the Law, of the social: or the notion that social norms (the big Other) depend upon their transgression – illustrated in an example Žižek returns to again and again (in Metastases of Enjoyment [1994], The Parallax View [2006], etc.) from the film A Few Good Men, where U.S. Marines kill one of their own under an unofficially sanctioned “code red.” But it is also worth examining thinkers who have theorized the notion of the unconscious in a manner outside of (but sympathetic to) Freudian psychoanalysis. Thus Walter Benjamin’s concept of the “optical unconscious,” developed in his “Little History of Photography” (1931) holds that photography shows the unconscious of physical actions (a horse’s or human’s gait, as in Eadweard Muybridge’s photographs); the feminist art historian Rosalind Krauss, in her 1993 book The Optical Unconscious, argues in dialogue with Benjamin that, rather, the concept of the unconscious in a more Freudian sense can be used to construct a counter-history of modern art.

Finally, the Marxist critic Fredric Jameson, in his influential 1981 study The Political Unconscious, argued that a given social field will have its own repressed (utopian) wishes, which are then realized in cultural objects like novels or films, which enact an “imaginary resolution of a real contradiction.” My reading of these theorists, then, will enable an encounter with contemporary digital and internet cultures and subcultures via psychoanalysis.

In what way, for example, do the machines with which we increasingly access the internet, our smartphones, that lie nestled next to our genitals in our pants pockets, contain our sexual desires and wishes? How is email, or even better, spam, to be understood as the Lacanian “letter that always arrives at its destination”? How are trolls and pornographic internet subcultures (4Chan) the “obscene underside” of the proper world of e-commerce and governmentality? Is the internet unconscious an optical one – full of images that reveal more than we wish, through Google Earth and webcams – or, more frighteningly, a political unconscious that, with its Taliban beheading videos but also crowdsourced social media revolutions (Twitter and Tahrir Square), requires a psychoanalytic account to fully understand its paradoxical dimensions of libido and trauma.

This, finally, will be my argument: that it is only by being able to work through the Freudian tradition that we can understand our current fixations with online culture: not an addiction but a repeating, not a hard drive but a death drive, not a virtual reality but a fantasy that is more Real than reality.

Suggested Readings:
Lacan, “Position of the Unconscious,” Écrits, 703-721
Benjamin, “Little History of Photography”

Optional Supplementary Readings:
Freud, “The Unconscious,” SE XIV: 159-215
Jameson, “On Interpretation: Literature as a Socially Symbolic Act,” The Political Unconscious, 1-88.
Rosalind Krauss, Chapter Four, The Optical Unconscious, 148-195
Slavoj Zizek, “Re-visioning ‘Lacanian’ Social Criticism: The Law and its Obscene Double,” Interrogating the Real, 262-282.

Feb. 25th – Jeff Derksen – On and Off the Waterfront

Urban waterfronts are a complex collision of life, commerce, industry and nature and they have – over the last forty years — become a site where residual industrial economies give way to a lifestyle-driven economy of the “creative city”. As an area that seems continually to be in flux, being made and remade as economic and cultural imperatives generate new demands, waterfronts have become even more densely historically layered ciphers for the contradictions and tensions have dropped down onto cities from decades of global urbanization. As a result, as Deb Cowen and Susannah Bunce argue, “Urban ports and waterfront areas are simultaneously local spaces and heavily contested sites where the multi-scalar politics of urban development, national security, continental defence and the global ‘war on terror’ are territorialized through built form.”

In Vancouver, the urban waterfront not escaped this rescaling and repoliticization. In fact, despite, its modest claims of being a “world-class city, Vancouver has in fact been world class in terms of the remaking of its waterfront – both in terms of the size of these remakings and in terms of the financial risks and benefits. For VISR we will look at cultural representations of Vancouver’s waterfront in relation to concept and the language of the post-political city. Such a post-political city builds an imagination of a city that is outside of politics because it naturalizes urban revitalization and because it uses a language of “lifestyle” rather than politics to justify urban transformations. In this imagination, the waterfront is the edge where nature, culture, and lifestyle meet. Can we identify the language of the post-political city, and the manner in which it has used public art on the waterfront both as an ornament to the spectacle of development and as a means to celebrate certain aspects of the city’s history?

Suggested Reading:
Erik Swyngedouw, Designing the Post-Political City and the Insurgent Politics
Deb Cowen and Susannah Bunce, “Competitive Cities and Secure Nations, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 30.2(June 2006): 428.

March 4th – Dina Al-Kassim
“Of Elephants and Kings: A Seminar on Jacques Derrida’s The Beast and the Sovereign, Vol. I”

With the translation of Michel Foucault’s 1975 seminar Society Must Be Defended in 2003, a new wave of interest in biopolitics, already underway since the appearance in English translation (1998) of Giorgio Agamben’s Homo Sacer, swept through several fields and established a discrete vocabulary for post 911 actualities and in particular for voices critical of the seeming normalization of refugee status, indefinite detention, torture and other sovereign exceptions that blur the distinction between rogue state and rule of law. While political philosophy has attended to intensifications and alterations in the contemporary framing and embodiment of state sovereignty, going so far as to suggest that the “state of exception” has become the rule, recent work in postcolonial studies, critical races studies, feminist philosophy, queer studies, third world cultural studies and literature offers nuanced and complex analyses of life in the margins, analyses that demonstrate the inextricability of state sovereignty and subjectivity. Openly resisting Agamben’s political despair, such writing contends that considerations of sovereignty that foreclose or ignore the many forms of subjection (sexual, racial, gendered, religious, class based, to name a few) cannot answer to the demands of description nor can they yield new resources for thought or action. Something of a polemic results, each side claiming its Foucault.

Enter Derrida’s detailed examination of sovereignty and a tradition that continually imagines self-possession, knowledge and power through a bestiary of mythical, gifted, foolish, crafty and dangerous animals. Proliferating distinctions that aim to define man from beast, Derrida’s meandering discourse provides us the means to question the enclosure of Agamben’s approach to the political animal and its biopolitics, which pictures the human caught in a vast holding pen or state of exception become global in ever more ruthless forms of diminished life. Focusing on the final three sessions of this work (pp. 250-349) we will follow Derrida’s engagement with Agamben’s appropriation of Foucault and augment that discussion through reference to two short texts: Agamben’s “What is an Apparatus?” and Foucault’s “The Confessions of the Flesh”.

Dina Al-Kassim is the author of On Pain of Speech: Fantasies of the First Order and the Literary Rant, Al-Kassim is a critical theorist working on contemporary political subjectivation, sexuality and aesthetics in the EU, USA, Middle East and Africa. On Pain of Speech examines ranting as a waste product of modern subjectivity. A Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies Associate and Associate Faculty at IGRSSJ, Professor Al-Kassim teaches in the English Department at UBC. Publications appear in Grey Room, International Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, Public Culture, Cultural Dynamics, and the volume Islamicate Sexualities.

Readings:
Jacques Derrida, The Beast and the Sovereign
ch 10-13
Giorgio Agamben, What is an Apparatus?
Michel Foucault, Confessions of the Flesh

March 11th – Matt Hern

In Praise of Sport

I am proposing that you should care about sports.

I submit that progressive, radical, ‘thinking’ people have long held condescending attitudes towards sports and have thus abandoned the sporting world as a legitimate place of contestation and struggle. This retreat has left the sports world easy prey for hyper-consumptive, violent, militaristic, sexist and homophobic politics and handed over the immense power of sports to some of the worst elements of our culture.

Noam Chomsky (echoing the Frankfurt school and many others) once said that if people paid as much attention to politics as they do to sports we would have a much better country. This is a fairly common sentiment I think, but he never would have said that about music, dance, theatre, painting or poetry. That contradiction is what I want to explore: I want us to consider sports as seriously as we take other ‘high’ art forms, and make it a place for legitimate contestation and politics. Sure capitalism has grotesquely distorted the sporting world, but what hasn’t it maimed?

I’ll argue that there is something very deep that even ungodly amounts of garish marketing, ultra-nationalist tendencies, hyper-corporatism, and dislikable athletes with their tricked-out Hummers can’t extinguish: we love sports for lots of really good and defendable reasons. One of those reasons is the bodies-on-bodies materiality of sports (or, in Nancian terms, touching) that marks out thresholds of difference: not fixing identities, but confirming them and their spacing. A spacing that is possible to play with, work with inside of a flexible, malleable notion of difference and a community that is bodily hospitable. It is a possibility which is so often misapprehended, but carries with it the promise of neighbourhood.

Taking these and a couple of other threads I want to make a specific argument for the relevance, power and possibilities of the sporting world, and why it is, can and should be a force for good in our culture.

Jean-Luc Nancy: The Inoperative Community
http://www.arts.rpi.edu/~ruiz/AdvancedIntegratedArts/ReadingsAIA/Nancy%20The%20Inoperative%20Community.pdf

March 18th – Steven Taubeneck – Kant’s Conflict of the Faculties

The Educational Sublime: Conflicts between Faculties

The President of The University of British Columbia. Dr. Stephen Toope, has a website called “Place and Promise,” where he discusses his vision for the university. The page includes a picture of someone standing on a rock overlooking the water and mountains in the distance, and evokes the “vistas” available to anyone at the school. Since it is a kind of recruitment document, the blatant recuperation of the sublime for educational purposes seems understandable. But what I want to expose in my paper is the historical and structural duplicity of this “educational sublime,” beginning with the articulation of the “dynamic sublime” in Kant’s Critique of Judgment. This use of the sublime conceals the conflicted, shifting foundations that have marked the university since Kant’s day as well.

My account of the fractured university will begin with Kant’s own “Conflict of the Faculties,” from 1798. In that work Kant responds to the reprimand of his king, who criticized him for his book Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone. On the one hand, he seeks to justify the king’s use of censorship. But on the other hand, he claims the need for a freedom form force within the university, especially regarding philosophy. Whereas theology, law and medicine are basically instruments of the government, and hence restricted by force, philosophy on his account would occur outside the governmental jurisdiction. Kant seeks to escape the governmental arm of the university in his rethinking of philosophy.

The second text in my account will be Martin Heidegger’s infamous “Rector’s Speech,” from 1933, entitled “The Self-Assertion of the German University.” On Heidegger’s account, philosophy will lead the university into a new domain. No longer seeking a kind of freedom in realm of reason, philosophy takes over the leadership of the student body by directing them towards the destiny of the people. In its context the speech marks a sinister event. Heidegger had become the Rector of the University of Freiburg under the National Socialists. Although he was to step down only eight months later, the kind of “responsibility” he proclaims for the university brings it closer to an arm of the totalitarian, government. When philosophy guides the university, according to Heidegger, it will lead in the direction of the state.

My third text will be the essay by Jacques Derrida from 1980, called “Mochlos, or The Conflict of the Faculties,” which explicitly returns to both Kant and Heidegger to mark the centenary of the graduate school at Columbia University, after Derrida had received an honorary degree there. Derrida wants to expose the “paradoxical structure” of the inside and outside of the university, as well as the divisions between the disciplines. Through his questioning of the university and its limits, he raises the question of the very legitimacy of law in the first place. For Derrida, the law of the law is a fundamentally paradoxical relation built into the foundations of the university. In other words, the “educational sublime” as envisioned by President Toope has developed through several different and basically contradictory forms over the last two centuries. My paper will show the historical and structural fault lines built into such a notion.

Readings:
Immanuel Kant The Conflict of the Faculties

March 25th – Thomas Kemple – History of Sexuality pt. 1, section 5:

The ‘Bio-Social’ Roots of Neoliberalism

Abstract of the Seminar: What today we call ‘neo-liberalism’ refers very loosely to a set of ideas which became popular in North America and the Europe in the 1980s about the how the rights of the individual are guaranteed by the free market against the coercive power of the state . For the most part, then, neoliberal ideas have been more influential in politics and economics than in sociology, history, or philosophy. In this seminar, we’ll consider two important sources of ‘neoliberalism’ which have been studied by French philosopher and historian, Michel Foucault: 1) 19th century social Darwinism of the 1860s and 70s with its ‘biological’ understanding of social life as a struggle for survival of the species which was partly inspired by classic liberal ideals of autonomy and free trade; and the social economics of the Freiburg and Chicago schools of economics in the 1920s and 30s which promoted moderate state intervention as a necessary condition for minimum social welfare. Our seminar will start by considering the challenging Part V of his History of Sexuality, Volume I, ‘The Right to Death and Power Over Life,’ since that’s where he first sketches the idea that liberal power is exercised less by protecting the interests of the state and society then by enhancing the vitality of individuals and populations.

Some background: My own research interests are in how ‘neoliberalism’ can be traced to the classical liberalism which informed the birth of sociology in the 19th century, which coincided with the emergence of evolutionary biology and scientific psychology. Drawing on the insights of philosophy, literature, history, and the arts, this new ‘science of social life’ also considered physics, mathematics, biology, and psychology as possible methodological models and theoretical allies. As sociology freed itself from from competing or complementary disciplines, and established its institutional legitimacy in universities and professional associations, it could then develop its own methods of research and objects of study. From the late 1870s to the late 1920s, the classical’ sociologists in Europe and North America proposed that ‘life’ itself has now become the central problem of human existence, superseding ‘society’ in the 18th century and ‘the individual’ in the 19th. They argued that the acceleration of the capitalist money economy offers opportunities for the management and control over human and non-human life while evoking ethical appeals to personal duty and collective responsibility. In recent years, social scientists and political philosophers writing under the influence of Michel Foucault’s later writings and lectures have been concerned with how these ideas inform recent concerns about how the genetic codification of life poses fundamental moral problems which exceed any techno-scientific, bio-medical, or bureaucratic solution. Membership in bio-social communities on the basis of race and sex, illness and age, they argue, is not determined solely by state regulation, but by biologically defined rights and entitlements, statuses and obligations in a variety of communal and institutional settings. A new style of ‘somatic ethics’ which exceeds the boundaries of professional expertise aims to translate the clinical goals of cure and care into the everyday disciplinary objectives of normalization and enhancement. Besides raising political quandaries over the biological basis of citizenship, this medical and moral ‘problematization of social life’ down to its molecular level also presents new opportunities for the economic investment of ‘biocapital’ and for therapeutic regulation through ‘biopower.’ Thus, later attempts by socio-biologists to reduce social life to its biological substratum, and by bio-sociologists to explore the social and cultural underpinnings of the bio-sciences, might seem to revive earlier debates which previous generations believed they had settled.

Reading: Foucault – The History of Sexuality Book 1, Section 5

April 1st – Randy Lee Cutler

Crystal Worlds – Between a Virtual and a Hard Place

Crystals have both a literal dimension and a metaphorical presence representing both a thing – crystalline solids- and a way of thinking about multiple facets and transformation. Through the figure of the crystal, this talk brings together theoretical, scientific and art historical approaches highlighting a shared fascination with these resilient and always emergent formations.

‘The Crystal World’ refers to the 1966 work of fiction by J.G. Ballard and Cyprien Gaillard’s 2013 exhibition at PS 1 in Brooklyn. Both works navigate unfamiliar geographical sites and explore the relationship between desire, nature and erosion. In varied ways, the atmospherically lush and mysterious environments evoke crystalline images where time is compressed producing a profound effect of opacity and indiscernability. Gilles Deleuze takes up the figure of transparency and reflection in his work Cinema II: The Time Image particularly chapter four, “The Crystals of Time” where he considers Post WWII cinema in light of the time-image, fragmentation and internal limits. Through a reflection on various films he offers us images of a world full of doublings, mirrors and dynamic extension. Drawing out the simultaneously actual and virtual potential of the moving image, the concepts that he proposes evoke models for looking at unconventional and otherworldly expressions of space and time, literature and visual art, organic and inorganic systems. The crystal circuit or the compression of unfolding time brings to the fore recollection, memory (real and virtual) where “Ever vaster circuits will be able to develop, corresponding to deeper layers of reality and higher and higher levels of memory or thought.” Like crystals themselves, the metaphors that they call up inhabit border worlds between genres, lifeforms and rhetorical strategies not to mention the slow geology of molecular time and space.

Randy Lee Cutler is a Vancouver based writer, artist and educator. Through the intersections of gender, art, science, and technology she investigates the emergence of new cultural forms and expression. Originally from Montreal, she lives in Vancouver where she is an associate professor at Emily Carr University of Art and Design.

Suggested Readings:
Gilles Deleuze, “The Crystals of Time” in Cinema II: The Time Image
Mark A. Cheetham, The Crystal Interface in Contemporary Art: Metaphors of the Organic and Inorganic in Leonardo (Vol. 43, No. 3, 2010)

Optional Supplementary Reading:
J.G. Ballard, The Crystal World

Contact – visrvancouver@gmail.com

Venue is wheelchair accessible.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



News

LA Art Book Fair

February 1 — February 3,
Reception Thursday, January 31, 6-9PM

The Or Gallery is please to participate in the first annual LA Art Book Fair, from February 1-3, at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA. An opening will be held on the evening of Thursday, January 31.

Presented by Printed Matter, the LA Art Book Fair is a unique event for artists’ books, art catalogs, monographs, periodicals, and zines presented by more than 180 international presses, booksellers, antiquarians, artists, and independent publishers from eighteen countries.

For more information, please visit http://laartbookfair.net

Preview: Thursday, January 31, 6–9 pm
Friday, February 1, 11-5 pm
Saturday, February 2, 11 am–6 pm
Sunday, February 3, 12 am–6 pm

The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
152 North Central Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012
(213) 626-6222

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Event

Daniel Barrow Winnipeg Babysitter at Club PuSh

January 26, 8PM

Club PuSh at Performance Works on Granville Island
1218 Cartwright Street, 19+

The Or Gallery is pleased to participate as a Community Partner in the presentation of Winnipeg Babysitter at Club PuSh as part of the 2013 PuSh Festival.

In the late 70s and throughout the 80s, Winnipeg experienced a ‘golden age’ of public access television whereby almost anyone with a creative dream was granted airtime and professional production services. When the archives of these precious gems were destroyed, artist Daniel Barrow went to work hunting down original producers, collectors and enthusiasts in order to salvage the footage. Part documentary and part performance project, Winnipeg Babysitter brings to light the outrageous and shameless personalities of public access television.
danielbarrow.com

……………………..
Tickets: $29
ticketstonight.ca | 604.684.2787
Additional service charges apply to phone orders. Eligible for PuSh Pass access.

Visit PuSh website

Winnipeg Babysitter

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Launch

Aaron Carpenter Exercises in Kinesthetic Drawing and Other Drawing

Saturday, December 15, 2-6PM

Please join the Or Gallery Saturday December 15th for the launch of Aaron Carpenter’s new book, Exercises in Kinesthetic Drawing and Other Drawing

It is the Or’s last day open before we break for the winter holidays, and we will be serving warm apple cider and will all be in a reasonably good mood. There will also be a large selection of books available from our Motto bookstore, and special deals and discounts to be had.

Exercises in Kinesthetic Drawing and Other Drawing is published by Or Gallery, and designed by Information Office

Reg. $25
Special launch price $20

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Things' Matter
Kika Thorne, Heather Passmore, Michael Drebert, Jen Weih
December 8, 2012 — January 26, 2013
Reception Friday, December 7, 8PM
Curated by Klara Manhal

Accompanying Talk with artist Kika Thorne and political theorist Dr. Laura Janara: December 11th, 7pm.
Gallery closed December 16th – January 5th.

The Or Gallery is pleased to present Things’ Matter, a group exhibition featuring works by Kika Thorne, Heather Passmore, Michael Drebert and Jen Weih.

Things’ Matter is an exhibition of contemporary art that draws on the concept of objecthood and thingness. Each artwork is invested in exploring the affecting nature of its material makeup and challenges the viewer to consider how inanimate things might be thought of as imbued with a vitality or life force.

In a series of prints utilizing ink made of plant matter and illustrating theoretical grids of light bending, Kika Thorne explores how plant matter responds to the manipulation of being used as ink to describe its own photosynthetic processes. Heather Passmore makes paintings from raw milk paint, hand made by the artist. Passmore’s interest is in the medicinal and nutritional properties of raw milk and the politics surrounding its designation as an illegal substance in Canada. Jen Weih and Michael Drebert are less oriented toward the material and instead explore the thing’s capacity to seduce and the effective potential that the human desire for things has on human behaviour. In a gestural work, Drebert uses his own body to transport a fisherman’s glass floater from Haida Gwaii back to its place of origin in Kamakura, Japan. While objects aren’t normally thought of as having desires and needs, Drebert assumes the ball’s yearning to return home and uses himself as a carrier and witness in this service. For Thing’s Matter, Jen Weih has made an animation using fragmented things pulled from the internet. Weih’s is an experiment in animating and anthropomorphizing these otherwise inanimate things that are the detritus of cultural production, human desire and need.

Things’ Matter is curated by Klara Manhal, a candidate to the Masters Degree in Critical and Curatorial Studies at The University of British Columbia.

BIOS
Kika Thorne is an artist, filmmaker and curator currently working towards her PhD in visual art at York University, Toronto. Kika Thorne received her MFA from the University of Victoria, BC and has exhibited extensively including projects at Berlinale Forum Expanded, Berlin; Murray Guy, New York; The Apartment, Access, Contemporary Art Gallery and Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver; Pleasure Dome, the Power Plant and G Gallery,Toronto, and recently at the Art Gallery of Windsor. Her work was also included in E-Flux Video Rental, which toured the globe for five years.
Vancouver based artist Heather Passmore obtained an MFA from the University of British Columbia in 2004. For the past ten years she has exhibited extensively in solo and group exhibitions across Canada and internationally. She conducts frequent artist talks and has published critical essays, and reviews. Heather has engaged in a number of international artist residencies and local community art projects. Her work was recently acquired by the Vancouver Art Gallery and is held in a number of other private and public collections.

Michael Drebert currently lives and works in Vancouver. He holds a BFA from Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design and an MFA from The University of Victoria. Michael’s work has been included in exhibitions at the Helen Pitt Gallery, Western Front Gallery, Lobby Gallery, The Contemporary Art Gallery and Blanket Gallery, among others.

Jen Weih is a multi-media artist and sessional instructor at the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design. Jen graduated with an MFA from the University of British Columbia in 2006 and since has been exhibited nationally and internationally. In 2006 her design was chosen for the Art Underfoot: Sanitary Sewer Cover, public art project.

This exhibition is made possible through support from the Killy Foundation and the Audain Endowment for Curatorial Studies through the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory in collaboration with the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at The University of British Columbia.

Jen Weih: "How Deep is You Disaster III", 2012

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Beothuck Building
Duane Linklater
October 20 — November 24,
Reception Friday, October 19, 8PM

The Or Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of a new solo exhibition by Ontario based artist Duane Linklater. The title of the exhibition refers directly to a seemingly innocuous office building in St.John’s, Newfoundland. For this exhibition, the building’s title has been appropriated by Linklater and transformed into a generative point of departure.

Initially, these two words refer simultaneously to the collapse of culture and an opportunity for recovery. Within a constellation of meanings these two words may evoke, Linklater will present work about his travel to Newfoundland, and his research into the history of the Beothuck people. Additionally, Linklater presents a new project stemming from email conversations with artist Joanna Malinowska and her project concerning Leonard Peltier and his painting.

Together, these works intertwine to mark forthcoming conversations concerning cultural loss and recovery, appropriation, and the role of production in respect to authority and complicated agencies. Linklater has also invited guests to generate possible meanings around Beothuck Building, presented as talks at the Or Gallery in October and November.

Talks

  • Raymond Boisjoly, October 23, 9PM

  • Kim Tallbear, October 24, 7PM
  • Duane Linklater and Joanna Malinowska, October 25, 7PM
  • David Horvitz, November 18, 2PM

Image: Cape Spear by Duane Linklater

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Screening

2084 (a science-fiction show)
Pelin Tan & Anton Vidokle
Sunday, October 14, 12PM as part of the Institutions by Artists convention (pass required), 2012

It’s 2084. Money has been abolished and people exchange information products as tokens of exchange. States have become ungovernable and borders have been redrawn by powerful individuals. Art has fully colonized life and every aspect of daily existence has become aesthetic. What used to be museums have now become data centers. Being is perpetual self-design. No one has a profession. There is no more work. A group of people may meet in a city that was once called Berlin, and there they will discuss the possibilities for independent cultural production…

2084 is a film directed by sociologist Pelin Tan and artist Anton Vidokle, commissioned by Or Gallery, on the occasion of the Institutions by Artists project, with the support of the BC Arts Council’s Innovations program.

With: Raimundas Malasauskas, Lauryn Youden, Michael Baers, Ahmet Ogut, Anna Elise Johnson, Jonathan Middleton, Tisha Mukarji, Kinga Kielczynska, Shuddhabrata Sengupta, Arlette Quynh Anh Tran, William Bennen, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Klaus Hu, Rachel Alliston, Anton Vidokle and Pelin Tan.

Directed by Pelin Tan and Anton Vidokle
Camera: Derek Howard
Edited by Anton Vidokle and Derek Howard
Sound design Tisha Mukarji
22:38, 2012
Special thanks to Hito Steyerl and Julieta Aranda.


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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



News

the New York Art Book Fair (booth #Q39)
Or Gallery at
September 28 — September 30, 2012
Reception Thursday, September 27, 6–9 pm

The Or Gallery will be participating for the first time at the New York Art Book Fair, presenting a selection of recent tiles including our special second edition of Stan Douglas’s Vancouver Anthology, Kathy & Slade’s 12 Sun Songs, and print editions by Hadley+Maxwell.

The Or Gallery booth is located at Q39, right next to Artspeak on the second floor.

_____

Printed Matter presents the seventh annual NY Art Book Fair, from September 28 to 30, at MoMA PS1, Long Island City, Queens. A preview will be held on the evening of Thursday, September 27.

Free and open to the public, the NY Art Book Fair is the world’s premier event for artists’ books, catalogs, monographs, periodicals, and zines presented by 283 international presses, booksellers, antiquarians, artists, and independent publishers from twenty-six countries.

Lucy Lippard and Paul Chan are the keynote speakers for this year’s Contemporary Artists’ Books Conference—a dynamic, two-day symposium on emerging practices and debates within art-book culture. The Classroom—a curated series of artist-led workshops, readings, and discussions—will engage visitors in lively conversation all weekend long. The NY Art Book Fair will also include special project rooms, screenings, book signings, and performances throughout the weekend.

Over 15,000 artists, book buyers, collectors, dealers, curators, independent publishers, and other enthusiasts attended the NY Art Book Fair in 2011.

Hours and Location
The NY Art Book Fair is free and open to the public.

Preview: Thursday, September 27, 6–9 pm
Friday, September 28, 12–7 pm
Saturday, September 29, 11 am–9 pm
Sunday, September 30, 11 am–7 pm

MoMA PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue at 46th Avenue
Long Island City, NY

New York Art Book Fair

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free