Launch

If I wanted to sit on the sand I wouldn't have brought this log.
Steven Brekelmans & Fiona Curtis
at Kitsilano Beach, 20 June — 2:00 PM, 2015

Please join us at Kitsilano Beach on Saturday, June 20th for the launch of a new artists’ book by Steven Brekelmans and Fiona Curtis. “If I wanted to sit on the sand I wouldn’t have brought this log” is a summary of log scouting for the 2015 summer season; Long Beach, British Columbia.

We will aim to be at the north end of the beach, near the parking lot at McNicoll Ave and Arbutus St. Look for our blue Or Gallery flag. Any location updates will be posted on twitter @OrGallery

*Note: In the unlikely event of rain, the launch will be held at 2PM at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street) instead.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Artist-Talk


Rehab Nazzal
6 June — 2:00PM, 2015

Please join us on Saturday, June 6th at 2:00PM for an artist’s talk by Rehab Nazzal. Nazzal will discuss her photographic works, A Dead Sea, in #saltandwater: The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict. Nazzal is a Palestinian-born multidisciplinary artist based in Toronto.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



bookstore

Liquidate

May 28, 5:00 — 9:00PM, 2015

Access Gallery
222 East Georgia St.
Vancouver, BC

We have been busy spring cleaning and are looking to clear out some of our excess stock at huge discounts in an effort to make room for upcoming fall titles.

Books priced at 15-80% off, with lots of great gems from our vaults and newer titles at special discounts.

Publications by:

— Access Gallery
— Contemporary Art Gallery
— Fillip
— New Documents
— Or Gallery
— Presentation House Gallery
— Western Front

Plus a large collection of used and rare books recently decommissioned from the private collections of the Contemporary Art Gallery and Fillip!

Drinks provided by Jameson Irish Whiskey.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Event

Or Gallery at Offprint London Art Book Fair 2015

May 22 — 25, 2015

The Or Gallery is pleased to be attending the 2015 Offprint London Art Book Fair, from May 22-25 in the Turbine Hall of the Tate Modern. On this occasion the Or Gallery will be launching a new book of drawings by Steven Brekelmans and Fiona Curtis entitled If I wanted to sit on the sand I wouldn’t have brought this log (numbered edition of 400). We will also be displaying a variety of our other publications, including photo-based artist’s books by Ron Terada and Barb Choit; the Vancouver Anthology; Ginger Goodwin Way; artists’ books and sound recordings by Cranfield & Slade, Aaron Carpenter and Brady Cranfield & Jamie Hilder; the 2015 Risograph Portfolio with works by Lorna Brown, Marina Roy and Aaron Carpenter; and a selection of books published by Fillip and New Documents.

offprintlondon.com

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Event

Or Gallery at SELECT Fair NYC

May 14 — 17, 2015
Reception VIP Preview May 13, 6-10PM

Roy Arden
Lorna Brown
Aaron Carpenter
Stan Douglas
Hadley+Maxwell
David Horvitz
Marina Roy
Ron Terada

May 14–17, 2015

VIP preview: May 13, 6pm

Or Gallery at SELECT NYC
Booth #208
Center 548
548 West 22nd Street (former Dia Building)
Chelsea

www.orgallery.org
www.select-fair.com

The Or Gallery is pleased to announce its participation in the 2015 SELECT Fair NYC (May 13–17). The gallery will exhibit a small selection of editions and single works by Vancouver-based artists pertaining to the city’s strong history of conceptual photographic and textual practices. These include Guilty, 1950 (2010), a previously unreleased photographic edition by Stan Douglas from his acclaimed “Midcentury Studio” series; Cockatoo Island (2009) by Ron Terada; America is Waiting (2007) by Roy Arden; and Sentences on Conceptual Art 1st Draft (2008) and Bungled Open Cube (2008) by Hadley+Maxwell.

Stan Douglas produced his “Midcentury Studio” series in 2010, meticulously staging a collection of photographs under the conceptual premise that they were the work of an anonymous Vancouver photographer practicing between 1945 and 1951. Work in the series includes studio shots of fashion and hair models, promotional shots for entertainers, candid street scenes and film noir-like snapshots of possible crime figures caught in the glare of a blinding flash bulb, destined for the newspaper pages. Guilty, 1950 is of this latter category. Reminiscent of the crime photography of Weegee (Arthur Fellig), the work depicts a well-coiffed man walking up a narrow stairwell, covering his face with his open palm against the ambushing photographer. The work stems from the same body of research used to produce Douglas’s critically acclaimed stage play Helen Lawrence, currently on international tour.

Hadley+Maxwell’s Bungled Open Cube (2008) and Sentences on Conceptual Art 1st Draft (2008) both started with a passage from Miguel de Cervantes’s Don Quixote: “The reason of the unreason with which my reason is afflicted so weakens my reason that with reason I murmur at your beauty.” Envisioning this sentence as part an early draft of Sol LeWitt’s 1969 Sentences on Conceptual Art, Hadley+Maxwell further extrapolate “prototypes” for LeWitt’s sentences and artworks, rendering them as crumpled notes rescued from the dustbin. Ron Terada’s Cockatoo Island (2009) documents his walkabout of Cockatoo Island, site of the 2008 Sydney Biennale. Presented in a serial layout, Terada’s Cockatoo Island “blacks-out” any visual evidence regarding the works in the exhibit, the trajectory of his walk, or any clues to the island itself, instead making visible some of the contextual undertones of the event. Roy Arden’s America is Waiting is a digital collage derived from internet-sourced images of American popular culture, technology, landscapes, and various others. The work borrows its title from a song by Brian Eno and David Byrne from their 1981 album My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, which pioneered a technique of collaging or sampling from vernacular sound sources.

About the Or Gallery
The Or Gallery (est. 1983) is a non-profit artist-run centre committed to exhibiting work by local, national, and international artists whose art practice is of a critical, conceptual and/or interdisciplinary nature. Since its inception, the gallery has acted as a space for research, proposition making, conceptual experimentation and documentation. The works presented in this sale were contributed by the artists to assist the Or Gallery in establishing an international residency apartment and studio in Vancouver. We extend our deep thanks to the contributing artists and their gallery representatives, including David Zwirner Gallery (New York), Catriona Jeffries Gallery (Vancouver), Jessica Bradley Gallery (Toronto), and Monte Clark Gallery (Vancouver).

Stan Douglas: Guilty, 1950 (2010)

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Geoffrey Winthrop-Young

27 April — 7 PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 2 – Am Johal – Nomos of the Anthropocene (Media Philosophy, European Graduate School)

March 9 – Willow Verkerk (Philosophy Grad Student: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) – Antigone’s Heroism

March 16th – Carla Nappi (UBC History and STS) – Prepositioning History

March 23rd – Glen Coulthard (UBC First Nations Studies and Poli Sci) – Urbs Nullius: Gentrification and Decolonization

March 30th – Matt Hern (urban space activist, SFU and UBC Urban Studies instructor) – Land As Freedom

April 6th – Geoff Mann (SFU Geography) – Sovereignty in a Warming World

April 13th – Harsha Walia (social justice activist) – Undoing Border Imperialism

April 20th – Christina Hendricks (UBC Philosophy) – Foucault on Beheading the Sovereign

April 27th – Geoffrey Winthrop-Young (UBC CENES and Media Studies) – “A Turbine Driven by Blood”: Ernst Jünger’s “Total Mobilization” between Hitler and Heidegger

April 27th
Geoffrey Winthrop-Young: “A Turbine Driven by Blood”: Ernst Jünger’s “Total Mobilization” between Hitler and Heidegger

First published in 1930, “Total Mobilization” marks Ernst Jünger’s departure from his radical right-wing journalism of the late 1920s, which on occasion took on an insurrectionist flair and was carried out in in critical solidarity with the fledgling Nazi party. Moving away from a more explicit engagement with politics, it looks ahead to Jünger’s most important essay, the still untranslated Der Arbeiter (“The Worker”), and beyond to the increasingly abstract mytho-historical reflections that would come to occupy him for the rest of a very long life (1895-1998). It is — even for Jünger — an uneven text, ambivalent in its evaluation of technology, and caught between a radical nationalism and the invocation of a ‘planetary’ techno-evolution that can do without nations and peoples, including Germany and the Germans. The ambiguities of style and argument have to do with the fact that the essay is in many ways an attempt, as it were, to un-lose the First World War by revealing an allegedly more profound level of events, a hidden evolution now emerging in the shape of a total military, economic, social, and psychic “mobilization,” in which the conventional narratives of winners and losers no longer apply. This invites comparisons with the analysis of WWI in Hitler’s Mein Kampf and Martin Heidegger’s attempts to come to grips with the ongoing WWII in the recently published infamous “Black Notebooks.”

Recommended reading: https://visrfreeschool.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/junger-total-mobilization-doc.pdf

Geoffrey Winthrop-Young is Acting Head of the Department of Central, Eastern and Northern European Studies at UBC and teaches in the German and Scandinavian programs.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Christina Hendricks

20 April — 7 PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 2 – Am Johal – Nomos of the Anthropocene (Media Philosophy, European Graduate School)

March 9 – Willow Verkerk (Philosophy Grad Student: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) – Antigone’s Heroism

March 16th – Carla Nappi (UBC History and STS) – Prepositioning History

March 23rd – Glen Coulthard (UBC First Nations Studies and Poli Sci) – Urbs Nullius: Gentrification and Decolonization

March 30th – Matt Hern (urban space activist, SFU and UBC Urban Studies instructor) – Land As Freedom

April 6th – Geoff Mann (SFU Geography) – Sovereignty in a Warming World

April 13th – Harsha Walia (social justice activist) – Undoing Border Imperialism

April 20th – Christina Hendricks (UBC Philosophy) – Foucault on Beheading the Sovereign

April 27th – Geoffrey Winthrop-Young (UBC CENES and Media Studies) – “A Turbine Driven by Blood”: Ernst Jünger’s “Total Mobilization” between Hitler and Heidegger

April 20th
Christina Hendricks – Foucault on Beheading the Sovereign

“What we need … is a political philosophy that isn’t erected around the problem of sovereignty, nor therefore around the problems of law and prohibition. We need to cut off the King’s head: in political theory that has still to be done.”

So said Michel Foucault in an interview first published in 1977 (“Truth and Power,” in Power/Knowledge, Ed. Colin Gordon, Pantheon, 1980). This presentation will not address whether or not political theory has yet cut off the king’s head (though discussion of this issue is welcome); rather, I will discuss why, according to Foucault, it should be done. What is the problem with thinking of power relations in terms of “law and prohibition,” in terms of sovereignty? Drawing from The History of Sexuality Volume I and some of the lectures in Society Must be Defended and Security, Territory and Population, I will distinguish between what Foucault calls “sovereign power” and “biopower,” and will explain his later understanding of power through the notion of “governmentality”. In this way I, along with those present through our discussion, will address why Foucault thought sovereignty no longer provided a useful model for analyzing power relations (at least in the mid- to late-twentieth century).

Christina Hendricks is a senior lecturer in UBC’s Philosophy department. She works predominantly on issues pertaining to ethics, sex, and gender.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Geoff Mann

6 April — 7PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 2 – Am Johal – Nomos of the Anthropocene (Media Philosophy, European Graduate School)

March 9 – Willow Verkerk (Philosophy Grad Student: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) – Antigone’s Heroism

March 16th – Carla Nappi (UBC History and STS) – Prepositioning History

March 23rd – Glen Coulthard (UBC First Nations Studies and Poli Sci) – Urbs Nullius: Gentrification and Decolonization

March 30th – Matt Hern (urban space activist, SFU and UBC Urban Studies instructor) – Land As Freedom

April 6th – Geoff Mann (SFU Geography) – Sovereignty in a Warming World

April 13th – Harsha Walia (social justice activist) – Undoing Border Imperialism

April 20th – Christina Hendricks (UBC Philosophy) – Foucault on Beheading the Sovereign

April 27th – Geoffrey Winthrop-Young (UBC CENES and Media Studies) – “A Turbine Driven by Blood”: Ernst Jünger’s “Total Mobilization” between Hitler and Heidegger

April 6th, 2015
Geoff Mann – Sovereignty in a Warming World

What might sovereignty come to mean as climate change challenges societies around the world? Widespread “progressive” support, even desperate hope, for global “agreements” might seem to suggest that the promised land of modern governance is a (“democratic”) planetary sovereign, at least in the carbon realm. However unlikely such arrangements actually are, the prospect of the uneven degradation of the planet as a global public good cannot help but put turn a magnifying glass on the content and form of modern sovereignty, even if we choose not to look through it. When we do, we find a fraught, contradictory, and unsettled set of dynamics, full of peril, but also, perhaps, full of possibility—some of which might point beyond sovereignty itself.

Geoff Mann teaches in SFU’s Geography Department.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Matt Hern

30 March — 7PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 2 – Am Johal – Nomos of the Anthropocene (Media Philosophy, European Graduate School)

March 9 – Willow Verkerk (Philosophy Grad Student: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) – Antigone’s Heroism

March 16th – Carla Nappi (UBC History and STS) – Prepositioning History

March 23rd – Glen Coulthard (UBC First Nations Studies and Poli Sci) – Urbs Nullius: Gentrification and Decolonization

March 30th – Matt Hern (urban space activist, SFU and UBC Urban Studies instructor) – Land As Freedom

April 6th – Geoff Mann (SFU Geography) – Sovereignty in a Warming World

April 13th – Harsha Walia (social justice activist) – Undoing Border Imperialism

April 20th – Christina Hendricks (UBC Philosophy) – Foucault on Beheading the Sovereign

April 27th – Geoffrey Winthrop-Young (UBC CENES and Media Studies) – “A Turbine Driven by Blood”: Ernst Jünger’s “Total Mobilization” between Hitler and Heidegger

March 30th, 2015
Matt Hern – Land As Freedom

For some time now I have been studying the Albina district of Portland, Oregon – the site of one of the most starkly racialized gentrification battles in America and currently embroiled in a well-publicized dispute over a Trader Joe’s and an empty lot. Starting there and moving through East Van, Coast Salish Territories, New Orleans, Jackson Mississippi and a few other spots, I interrogate dominant gentrification theory to connect everyday inequality to our understandings of land, ownership and wealth. I submit that considering property theory can lay some of the groundwork for understanding how contemporary divergences in wealth are accelerated and deepened – not just between individuals, but within and between places – and then how that divergence is wielded in the service of racialization, displacement and dispossession.

Even in an age of financialization and servicization capitalism remains more about land than production: constantly seeking new spaces for profit and relentlessly reterritorializing. Thus, assertions of commonality are forced to confront the conundrums of property, and ultimately, land. I hope to bring both post-development and decolonizing sensibilities to bear as I offer some ideas about both sovereignty and the commons, and what those ideas might, and should mean.

Matt lives and works in East Vancouver, Coast Salish Territories, with his partner and daughters. He has founded and directed the Purple Thistle Centre, Car-Free Vancouver Day and Groundswell Grassroots Economic Alternatives among many other community projects. His books and articles have been published on all six continents and translated into ten languages. He currently teaches in CBU’s MBA program is an Adjunct Professor in UBC’s SCARP program. He has taught at many other universities, and continues to lecture globally.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

adrift
David Hartt
March 28 — May 9, 2015
Reception Friday, March 27, 8PM

Artist talk presented by SFU Galleries at SFU Woodward’s Thursday, March 26, 7PM

The Or Gallery is pleased to present adrift, a new film installation by David Hartt. The film is a work of speculative fiction set 50 or so years in the future, wherein the entire population of the island nation of Tuvalu has been displaced due to global warming and resulting rising water levels. The Tuvalese have relocated to a high-density Soleriesque arcology, commissioned and built on the banks of the Mississippi river. The story draws influence from both Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn and Kobo Abé’s Inter Ice Age 4. The main character Saini’s journey traces a territory of uncertainty: uncertain identities, economies and borders. The film considers the impossibility of someone living in our present to understand the moral and cultural conditions of someone from the distant future.

The footage was shot in Tuvalu, which appears in the film as the Mississippi river settlement and quarantine zone. Bertrand Goldberg’s River City complex in Chicago appears as the Tuvalese arcology, and models from the Goldberg Archive, of unbuilt phases of the River City complex, appear as the exteriors of the Tuvalese arcology.

Hartt’s work to date has addressed the relationship between ideology and the built environment. adrift addresses what happens to an ideology when the environment that informs it disappears. Specifically, Hartt is interested in the changing concept of sovereignty in the 21st century; both virtual and physical.

adrift was commissioned by the Or Gallery and Threewalls (Chicago) as part of the Slow Frequency Series curated by Shannon Stratton, Jonathan Middleton, and Dan Devening. Slow Frequency addresses currents in artwork that engage a process of slow looking, magnification or tuning-in in order to locate the place where a thing becomes visually or sonically clearest. Whether manifest in photography, film, appropriation strategies or other forms of image or object making, the process of tuning in to a space, an ideology, or a transmission is presented as a practice or gesture of careful observation. The series is collaboratively produced by Threewalls , Or Gallery and Devening Projects+Editions (Chicago). This exhibition is also produced in partnership with the Capture Photography Festival and SFU Galleries

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Glen Coulthard

23 March — 7PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 23rd, 2015
Glen Coulthard – Discussion and Q and A

Glen Coulthard is a member of the Yellowknives Dene First Nation and an assistant professor in the First Nations Studies Program and the Department of Political Science at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Carla Nappi

16 March — 7PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 16th, 2015
Carla Nappi – Prepositioning History

This talk is going to focus on the significance of prepositions and their linguistic relatives for thinking with, and for translating, materiality in history. We’ll approach objects as loci of proximal relationships. We’ll consider what it entails to build a historical archive that’s attentive to that approach. We’ll imagine what an art of historical composition based on such an approach would look like. And we’ll try to bring it all home with a case study from an ongoing project on Manchu bodies and the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911).

Carla Nappi is Canada Research Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of History at UBC.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Event

Dot Feature: Closing Party and Edition Launch
Raymond Boisjoly, Jeff Downer & Kyla Mallett
14 March — 4:00 PM, 2015

Please join us on Saturday, March 14th at 4:00 PM for the closing party of Dot Feature: The 2015 Artist Residency for Risograph Printing, where we will be launching new editions by the residency’s participants. Other Risographed publications, editions and materials will also be on display.

Dot Feature is the Or Gallery’s first print residency program, based around our newly acquired Risograph machine. Local and internationally based artists are invited to work with the machine over a period of several weeks to produce new risograph-printed editions.

Risograph printing uses stencil duplication, a process similar to mimeograph or silk screen. The Risograph makes a master by thermally imprinting an image onto wax paper. This master is wrapped around an ink drum, and ink is stenciled through the master onto the paper. The machine prints one colour at a time, so each additional colour in an image requires another run through the machine. The Risograph was first produced in 1986, mainly intended for use in offices. Since then they have become popular with artists, designers and publishers for their unique aesthetic.

The works produced during Dot Feature will help to fundraise for the Or Gallery’s capital project, the Programming and Residency Space. The multi-purpose space will provide affordable accommodation for visiting artists, curators and writers. It will also act as a public venue for talks and presentations, educational programs, curatorial collaborations, and symposia, and will create educational opportunities for students and emerging artists through mentorships and internships.

The residency’s first participants are Raymond Boisjoly, Jeff Downer and Kyla Mallett.

Image: new edition by Jeff Downer.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Harsha Walia

13 April — 7 PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 2 – Am Johal – Nomos of the Anthropocene (Media Philosophy, European Graduate School)

March 9 – Willow Verkerk (Philosophy Grad Student: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium) – Antigone’s Heroism

March 16th – Carla Nappi (UBC History and STS) – Prepositioning History

March 23rd – Glen Coulthard (UBC First Nations Studies and Poli Sci) – Urbs Nullius: Gentrification and Decolonization

March 30th – Matt Hern (urban space activist, SFU and UBC Urban Studies instructor) – Land As Freedom

April 6th – Geoff Mann (SFU Geography) – Sovereignty in a Warming World

April 13th – Harsha Walia (social justice activist) – Undoing Border Imperialism

April 20th – Christina Hendricks (UBC Philosophy) – Foucault on Beheading the Sovereign

April 27th – Geoffrey Winthrop-Young (UBC CENES and Media Studies) – “A Turbine Driven by Blood”: Ernst Jünger’s “Total Mobilization” between Hitler and Heidegger

April 13th
Harsha Walia – Undoing Border Imperialism

This talk, based on Harsha Walia’s book by the same name (AK Press/IAS 2013), situates immigrant rights movements within a transnational analysis of capitalism, labor exploitation, settler colonialism, state building, and racialized empire. By providing the alternative conceptual frameworks of border imperialism and decolonization, this talk offers relevant insights for all grassroots and social movement organizers on effective strategies to overcome the barriers and borders within our movements in order to cultivate fierce, loving, and sustainable communities of resistance striving toward liberation.

Harsha Walia is a South Asian activist, writer, and popular educator rooted in migrant justice, Indigenous solidarity, Palestinian liberation, antiracist, feminist, anti-imperialist, and anticapitalist movements and communities for over a decade.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Willow Verkerk

9 March — 7PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 9th, 2015
Willow Verkerk – Antigone’s Heroism

A recent proliferation of feminist and post-colonial literature admires Antigone as inspiration for activist heroism: her integrity, perseverance, and capacity to sacrifice make her a venerable archetype for resistance. Antigone’s defiance of Creon and civil law as a guardian of the family and of her own moral-religious beliefs poses her as such a figure for Judith Butler. But does this use of Antigone give fair due to her tragic circumstances and familial loyalties? Jacques Lacan’s reading of the Antigone asks us to consider what is at the source of her “splendour,” to question our redeeming beautification of this self-impelled victim. I ask what is ethically salient about Antigone that makes her heroic for contemporary visions of political activism.

Recommended readings: http://classics.mit.edu/Sophocles/antigone.html
https://visrfreeschool.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/chapter3antigonesclaim.pdf

Willow Verkerk is a doctoral candidate at the Institute of Philosophy, University of Leuven, Belgium. She specializes in 19th and 20th century German and French philosophy, contemporary feminist thought, and posthumanism. Her work has appeared in Journal of Nietzsche Studies, Philosophy and Literature, Nietzsche’s Therapeutic Teaching (Bloomsbury), and Philosophy Now.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Vancouver Institute for Social Research: Am Johal

2 March — 7PM, 2015

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, graduate-level, theory-based free school that began in Feb. 2013. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s fourth session will be organized around the theme of “Sovereignty,” and is being held from March 2 to April 27, 2015.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), professors, grad students, and local activists will be presenting on topics of their choice. The seminar will be free to the public and advance readings will be distributed through our Wordpress site. Videos of past classes can be found here.

Venue is wheelchair accessible

March 2nd, 2015
Am Johal – Nomos of the Anthropocene

This talk will provide a critical introduction to new questions of sovereignty, law and jurisdiction presented by the geological epoch known as the Anthropocene. It will grapple with the question ‘who decides?’ as it relates to the current climate crisis and the movement from the present to the future.

Am Johal is Director of SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement. He completed his dissertation ‘Ecological Metapolitics: Badiou and the Anthropocene’ in 2014.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Residency

Dot Feature: 2015 Artist Residency for Risograph Printing
Raymond Boisjoly, Jeff Downer, Kyla Mallett
17 February — 14 March, 2015

Curated by Kate Noble

Dot Feature is the Or Gallery’s first print residency program, based around our newly acquired Risograph machine. Local and internationally based artists are invited to work with the machine over a period of several weeks to produce new risograph-printed editions.

Risograph printing uses stencil duplication, a process similar to mimeograph or silk screen. The Risograph makes a master by thermally imprinting an image onto wax paper. This master is wrapped around an ink drum, and ink is stenciled through the master onto the paper. The machine prints one colour at a time, so each additional colour in an image requires another run through the machine. The Risograph was first produced in 1986, mainly intended for use in offices. Since then they have become popular with artists, designers and publishers for their unique aesthetic.

The works produced during Dot Feature will help to fundraise for the Or Gallery’s capital project, the Programming and Residency Space. The multi-purpose space will provide affordable accommodation for visiting artists, curators and writers. It will also act as a public venue for talks and presentations, educational programs, curatorial collaborations, and symposia, and will create educational opportunities for students and emerging artists through mentorships and internships.

The residency’s first participants are Raymond Boisjoly, Jeff Downer and Kyla Mallett.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



curatorial-talk

Madison Killo on Beginning the Shape

31 January — 2:00PM, 2015

Please join us at the Or Gallery on Saturday, January 31st at 2:00PM for a talk by Madison Killo, curator of Beginning the Shape.

The exhibition includes works by Kristen Abdai, Mel Paget, Maya Beaudry and Scott Kemp.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



bookstore

Readings by Kegan McFadden, Nick Lakowski, Marina Roy and Anakana Schofield

24 January — 4:30 PM, 2015

Please join us at the Or Gallery on Saturday, January 24th for readings by Kegan McFadden, Nick Lakowski, Marina Roy and Anakana Schofield.

Kegan McFadden will read from the recently published artist book, he. This text uses the technique of a singular pronoun, “he”, and purposely confuses understandings of an individual protagonist, or linear narrative, by offering numerous stories of a supposed singular “he” at different stages of life. From simple delusions to very real health concerns, these pieces attempt a micro/macrocosm loosely considering themes of masculinity, failure, queerness, aging, and entropy.They are part autobiographical and part fabrication. They are meant to allude to an index, but are purposely incomplete, offering glimpses but never the whole story. His recent publications include With Alec in Mind (2012), an artist book concerning the 1995 murder of a scrap metal/junk farmer in rural Manitoba by his grandson, and the poetry chapbook, Notes from a Fog (The Vancouver Poems, 2010) about McFadden’s messy, lost years in Vancouver.

Nick Lakowski is a Vancouver based artist. He holds a BFA in studio art from Emily Carr University (2004) and an MFA in studio art from the University of British Columbia (2012). His work is grounded in a commitment to grassroots community projects, including experience as a teacher, muralist, volunteer, board member, curator, and events facilitator for a variety of local schools, businesses, festivals, DIY art spaces, and artist-run galleries. His writing explores mostly fiction, with subject matter focused on the culture of medicine, illness, disorientation, cancer, and a mystical hysteria towards resuscitation and immorality. His painting draws anxiously and humorously from the aesthetic and behavioural determinations of data visualization, psychology, and neurobiology, the world of commercial painting and paint manufacturing, various indexes and orders of colour, and the redactive/disclosive procedure of painting itself.

Marina Roy is a Vancouver-based artist and writer. Working chiefly in the areas of drawing, painting, video and animation, her artwork explores the intersection between materials, matter, natural vs. human history, and the grotesque. In 2001 she published sign after the x (Artspeak/Arsenal Pulp), an encyclopedic book which revolves around the letter X and its multiple meanings across human cultures. She is currently completing a book project titled Queuejumping. In 2010 she was recipient of the VIVO award. She is associate professor in visual art at the University of British Columbia.

Anakana Schofield writes fiction, essays, and literary criticism. Malarky, her first novel, won the Amazon.ca First Novel Award, the Debut-Litzer Prize for Fiction, was selected as a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Pick, and was shortlisted for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize. Malarky was named on sixteen different Best Books of the Year lists. Her second novel, Martin John–a footnote novel to Malarky–will be published Fall 2015 in North America.

Image: April 13 (2010) by Nick Kline. Pigment ink print from the series Boys’ Shirts.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Event

A Holiday Party & Edition Launch at the Or Gallery

Thursday December 11th — 7 - 10:30 PM, 2014

Cocktails! Editions! DJs! Fun times for all.

Launch of the new Or Gallery Risograph Edition Portfolio with prints by Lorna Brown, Aaron Carpenter, and Marina Roy.

PLUS White Columns Print Portfolio (2007)
letter-press prints by Peter Doig, Dave Muller, Adam Pendleton, and Kay Rosen.

PLUS Or Gallery editions by Stan Douglas, Ron Terada, Nicole+Ryan, Hadley+Maxwell

PLUS Fillip & New Document editions

DJ Kathy Slade! DJ Kevin Romaniuk!

Discounts on Or Bookstore books and more!

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free