Launch

Donato Mancini
New Star Books: Loitersack

Saturday, Novermber 22nd, 8:30PM

New Star Books launch

In his new book Loitersack, Donato Mancini (You Must Work Harder to Write Poetry of Excellence, Bookthug, 2012) extends his inquiry of Canadian poetry and poetics in the form of a book that contains poetry, poetics, theory and theory theatre.

In many ways a companion piece to You Must Work Harder, Loitersack works through some of the problems and questions Mancini posed in that work, a more manifest (if not traditional) work of criticism. Loitersack is in some senses a commonplace book — a scrapbook of borrowed quotations — in other senses it is the poet’s personal book of critical reflections, describing a broad topography of poetic knowledge. Like all Mancini’s work, it’s wired for explosive laughter; and as in all his previous work, Mancini sets out to write a book unlike anything else he — or anyone else, for that matter — has ever read.

The launch party will include a short poetry reading by Mr. Mancini, followed by the Vancouver premiere public reading of Mancini’s 1-act neo-absurdist play “THEQRY” (featured in Loitersack) featuring Ash Lee as OFFICER, Jesse Malakoe as DONNY, Lisa McLeod as ISADORA, and Dawn McLeod as MOTHER.

Doors open at 8:30 and the performance will begin promptly at 9:00 pm. Refreshments will be provided and books will be for sale.

More info about the book at NewStarBooks.com
more event details on Facebook

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton Street.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Two Films About Pressure
Andreas Bunte
October 18 — November 22, 2014
Reception Friday, October 17, 8pm

Underdruck (Low Pressure), 2013
16mm film transferred to HD Video, colour, sound, 12:00 min.

Künstliche Diamanten (Synthetic Diamonds), 2013
16mm film transferred to HD Video, colour, sound, 13:16 min.

The Or Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition by Berlin-based artist Andreas Bunte. The two films of the installation revolve around the human attempt to reproduce the high and low pressure that occurs in nature. This seemingly scientific concern serves as the starting point for an investigation into two particular sites and technologies affected by the fall of the Berlin Wall and the re-unification of Germany.

Künstliche Diamanten (Synthetic Diamonds) depicts the process–from beginning to end–of synthetic diamonds being produced. The recordings were made at the Vollstädt Diamant GmbH, a company set up by mineralogist Professor Heiner Vollstädt, who began his research on the production of synthetic diamonds in the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) 40 years ago at the Zentralinstitut für Physik der Erde (Central Institute for Physics of the Earth). In the late 1970s the production of synthetic diamonds became a prestigious project for the GDR government, with the aim of ending the GDR’s dependency on diamond imports from the USSR and the West.

After the reunification of Germany the Institute was discontinued. Vollstädt transported some of the machinery from the former Academy of Science of the GDR to a disused military camp outside Potsdam to continue his research and the production of synthetic diamonds as a private enterprise.

Unterdruck (Low Pressure) was shot in an Athletic training facility in the former GDR that was built in the late 1970s to simulate the effects of high altitudes. Allowing athletes to prepare for performing in atmospheres different to those found in the GDR, it reduced the need for athletes to travel outside Eastern Europe. A top secret facility at the time, the site was abandoned after the peaceful revolution of 1989 that ultimately led to the unification of Germany. The fate of the site was the result of a double economic incompatibility: it was too expensive to be kept in use, and too expensive to be dismantled.

Andreas Bunte lives and works in Berlin, Germany. He is currently a fellow at the Norwegian Artistic Research Fellowship Programme of the Academy of Fine Art Oslo.

Both films were commissioned by Cornerhouse Manchester for the show Anguish & Enthusiasm: What Do You Do With Your Revolution Once You’ve Got It, curated by Sarah Perks and Declan Clarke. This exhibition is produced in collaboration with SFU School for the Contemporary Arts and Republic Gallery, and is part of the Or Gallery’s Slow Frequency series in partnership with Threewalls and devening projects + editions (Chicago).

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



bookstore

Vancouver Art/Book Fair 2014
Vancouver Art Gallery, 750 Hornby St.
4 — 5 October, 2014
Reception (Vancouver Art Gallery & Project Space Members Only) Friday 3 October, 6-8PM

The Or Gallery & Or Bookstore will be participating in toe 2014 Vancouver Art/Book Fair. Free and open to the public, the Vancouver Art/Book Fair is the only international art book fair in Canada and one of only two on the West Coast. In 2014 the event launches with a Members Preview on October 3 from 6–8pm and takes place on October 4 and 5 from 12pm to 5pm. It is anticipated to attract over 1,500 visitors from across the Greater Vancouver Area and beyond.

Presented by Project Space, VA/BF is a two-day festival of artists’ publishing featuring nearly one hundred local, national and international publishers, as well as a diverse line-up of programs, performances and installations. Featured artists travel to Vancouver from across Canada and the globe, and produce everything from books, magazines, zines and printed ephemera to digital, performative or other experimental forms of publication.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

The Troubled Pastoral Series: 31 soleils (Dawn Chorus)
Jean-Pierre Aubé
5 September — 11 October, 2014
Reception Thursday 4 September, 8:00PM
Curated by Mark Lanctôt and Jonathan Middleton

31 soleils (Dawn Chorus) is a video of a solar transit filmed through an H-Alpha solar telescope accompanied by a composition created from recordings of 31 different frequencies culled from the extremely low end of the radio spectrum. The piece refers to a specific phenomenon where at dawn one can pick up – if using the proper equipment – an array of radio signals that are not usually within geographic range.

Aubé has developed a system of tracking and compiling frequencies allowing him to indirectly monitor displacements and variations of the sun’s radio waves and its effect on the range and power of a variety of broadcast systems on earth. This data is then used as a score to create the composition from the same material, i.e., evangelical preachers, cuban propaganda, Taiwanese commercial radio.

The image of the sun was filmed through an H-Alpha telescope (which filters out all of the light spectrum save red, but not any red: a red that corresponds to the wavelength of Hydrogen). The video shows the state of the sun, visually echoing its affect on the propagation of waves.

The exhibition also features a second piece that employs a similar process: V.L.F. Finland – 21.12.2002 captures the sound of Northern Lights and signals from Russian submarines.

31 soleils (Dawn Chorus) marks the fourth of a series of exhibitions and projects curated and produced by Mark Lanctôt and Jonathan Middleton under the title The Troubled Pastoral. The series takes on a broad set of themes including pessimism, psychedelia, altered states and drug use, black comedy, science-fiction dystopia, class struggle (within the context of an increasingly marginal or absent middle class), the industrialization of food production, the ragged edge of suburbia, and various forms of visual, aural, or perceptual interference, including smoke, static and electro-magnetic radiation.

Jean-Pierre Aubé lives and works in Montreal.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Screening

Aaron Carpenter, Ovide Cohen, Stan Douglas, Allison Hrabluik, Marina Roy, Kevin Schmidt, Dan Starling
Edinburgh Art Festival Film Club: Vigne

Screening// Wednesday, August 6, 7PM (GMT)
Curated by Jonathan Middleton

Or Gallery is pleased to present Vigne, a series of short videos by Vancouver-based artists. Using the rhizomatic structure of vines as a departure point, the series explores the vignette as a form, but also tangentially considers themes of doubling, identity, and speculation.

This year’s Edinburgh Art Festival Film Club considers the themes raised by its main exhibition Where do I end and you begin. The programme explores subjects including post – digital nomadism, non-materialism and the importance of virtual identities. The festival invited four artist-run spaces from across the Commonwealth: Or Gallery, Canada; Dog Park Art Projects Space, New Zealand; KHOJ International, India and Embassy Gallery, Scotland to prepare selections of moving image work by promising artists from their countries.

At:
CodeBase, Argyle House, 3 Lady Lawson Street, Edinburgh,
EH3 9DR

Free tickets at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/

Marina Roy, Sleeper (video still), 2004

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Event

One Night Only
Dan Starling and Barb Choit
August 2 — 5:00PM, 2014

Please join the Or Gallery for an evening with Vancouver based artist Dan Starling and New York and Vancouver based artist Barb Choit on Saturday, August 2nd.

Barb Choit will show a new work entitled 20th Century Sculpture/20th Century Sculpture: a slide presentation curated from the 35mm slide collection at Emily Carr University of Art and Design. 20th Century(…) is a follow up project to Choit’s 2002 artist book Ten Shows, which documents ten slide shows that she curated from the slide library at the California Institute of the Arts. Twelve years later, to coincide with the republishing of her original artist book by the Or Gallery, Choit has curated a new selection of 35mm slides to be projected as an installation piece. Choit scoured the ECUAD 35mm slide collection for images of 20th Century sculptures that exist in duplicate within the library’s holdings. She used these image pairs to create two near-identical slide presentations to be projected side-by-side. The resulting work is an art historical survey of 20th Century sculptures within the ECUAD collection—doubled. Showing the duplicate images adjacent to each other reveals inconsistent photographic conditions, such as fading film stock, uneven cropping, or the accidental reversal of images. As a whole, this collection of idiosyncratic image-objects comprise a visual archive of the institution’s pedagogy.

Dan Starling will read from his new book The Culture Industry and the Propaganda Factory, co-presented by New Documents and Malaspina Printmakers. The Culture Industry and the Propaganda Factory is a complete rewrite of Roald Dahl’s classic book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, reimagining Dahl’s book as an absurdist fairytale overlayed on top of and intertwining with Dahl’s original illustrated narrative. When Charlie and the Chocolate Factory was first published in 1964, it was severely criticized by the NAACP and others for its depiction of the workers at Willy Wonka’s factory as “black pigmies from Africa.” Dahl eventually sympathized with these critiques, revising the book in 1973 and recasting the workers as the Oompa Loompas the book is now well known for.

Using this literary history as a point of reference, Starling imagines four subsequent revisions, each less and less able to cope with what he sees as the “unknown trauma” Dahl’s second edition attempted to repress. In our version (Starling’s third revision), the story has become a tale of the journey of five children to the Culture Industry’s “Propaganda Factory.”

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



bookstore

Summer Sale

July 11 — August 2, 2014

Or Bookstore’s Summer Sale is on from now until August 2nd! Everything in the store is 10-60% off. Buy three books and get a free tote bag; buy five and get a free Or Gallery mug too! Come stock up on your beach reading, then go out and get your new tote all sandy.

Or Gallery publications 30% off
magazine back issues: 60% off
everything else in store: 10% off

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

Visiting Curators Talks at the Contemporary Art Gallery

Saturday 17 May, 7:00PM, 2014

Contemporary Art Gallery
555 Nelson Street

Please join us for a series of presentations discussing their programs and institutions by German curators Maike Behm (Kunsthalle Lingen), Bart van der Heide, (Kunstverein München) and Melanie Bono (Westphälisches Landesmuseum Münster and Skultpturprojekte Münster), on the occasion of their research visit to Vancouver. Presented in partnership with the Contemporary Art Gallery and the Embassy of Canada in Berlin. For more information on the curators click here: READ MORE.

Image: Kunsthalle Lingen, Germany.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Dust on the Lens
Jeremy Everett, Simone Jones, Richard T. Walker and Will Wilson
10 May — 28 June, 2014
Reception Friday, May 9, 8pm
Curated by Michaela Rife

The Or Gallery is pleased to present Dust on the Lens, a group exhibition featuring works by Jeremy Everett, Simone Jones, Richard T. Walker and Will Wilson.

This exhibition joins four recent artistic responses to the desert of the American West, arguably one of the most conflicted and contradictory North American geographies. The desert is at once exploited and protected, poisoned and adored. With one eye to preceding generations of artists in the desert (from canonical sculptors to the anthropological projects of photographers), and another to contemporary realities of land use, each artist employs a lens-based medium to consider the site. Theirs is not the fantastical desert of mystics or the wilderness of pilgrimage, rather it is a land very much impacted by its human and technological histories.

In some cases these realities are confronted by introducing everyday technologies to sublime, protected sites. In others, the artist’s body is introduced to the image, complicating the expected relationship between the ostensibly untouched wilderness and the human. The nexus between the American desert and the artist’s lens opens onto crucial questions that demand the viewer rethink their place in traditionally accepted categories of nature and landscape.

Dust on the Lens is guest curated by Michaela Rife, a candidate to the Master’s Degree in Critical and Curatorial Studies at The University of British Columbia.

This exhibition is made possible with support from the Killy Foundation and the Audain Endowment for Curatorial Studies through the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory in collaboration with the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at The University of British Columbia.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Special-Project

Death & Objects III
Christian Pelech
April 23 — April 25, 2014
Reception Tuesday, April 22, 8-10PM

Offsite project at 1965 Main Street, Vancouver

But the iniquity of oblivion blindly scattereth her poppy, and deals with the memory of men without distinction to merit of perpetuity

- Sir Thomas Browne, from Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial (1658)

The Or Gallery is pleased to present work by Vancouver artist Christian Pelech as its contribution to Thru the Trapdoor, a 5-day art event located in the former Aldebridge Mini-storage at 1965 Main Street, a building that has housed VIVO Media Arts (formerly Video In Studios and Video Out Distribution), ON MAIN, Gallery 1965, New Forms Festival, and many other organizations and artists.

Pelech’s drawing, excerpt from “An Abridged History of Death and Taxes” pgs. 29-43 (2014, pencil on tax ledger) is a year long meditation on the various representations of death, in dialogue with the writings of Sir Thomas Browne. The work forms part three of the Or Gallery’s ongoing Death & Objects series of exhibitions dealing with the still life, sculpture, and momento mori. This project was curated by Or Gallery Director/Curator Jonathan Middleton on the occasion of the demise of this important arts facility in Vancouver, and the specific context of the Aldebridge Mini-storage, a site that was left with many personal artifacts, left or abandoned by their previous owners.

Christian Pelech, excerpt from "An Abridged History of Death and Taxes" pgs. 29-43 (2014, pencil on tax ledger) (detail)

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

How Wheeling Feels When the Ground Walks Away
James Hoff
April 5 — May 3, 2014
Reception Saturday, April 5, 8PM (Artist talk at 7PM)
Curated by Kathy Slade

The Or Gallery is pleased to present How Wheeling Feels When the Ground Walks Away, an eight channel immersive sound installation by James Hoff. The audio composition is comprised of samples from approximately fifty riots spanning four decades, which took place at concerts varying from a John Cage concert in Italy to a Dead Prez concert at Evergreen State College, and in the streets during political unrest in India, China, and Greece.

James Hoff is an artist and publisher who lives and works in New York. He works across diverse formats including the artists’ book, live performance, writing, painting, sculpture, and sound art. Guided by both his editorial practice and archival impulses, Hoff employs minor histories as source material, which are then re-worked or re-contextualized, forging new relations that reflect on contemporary practice or further compound, expand, or expose the underlying history.

Hoff has recently participated in exhibitions at: MoMA, New York; VI,VII, Oslo, Norway; TEAM Gallery, New York; IMO, Copenhagen, Denmark; Air de Paris, Paris, France; LUMA Foundation, Zurich, Switzerland; and Publication Studio Vancouver. Hoff co-founded the non-profit art organization Primary Information with Miriam Katzeff in 2006.

How Wheeling Feels When the Ground Walks Away is guest curated by Kathy Slade and marks the second of a series of exhibitions and projects comprising The Troubled Pastoral. The series, conceived of by Mark Lanctôt and Jonathan Middleton, takes on a broad set of themes including pessimism, psychedelia, altered states and drug use, black comedy, science-fiction dystopia, class struggle (within the context of an increasingly marginal or absent middle class), the industrialization of food production, the ragged edge of suburbia, and various forms of visual, aural, or perceptual interference, including smoke, static, and electro-magnetic radiation.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



bookstore

The Magazine Buyer's Club

Starting February, 2014

Or Bookstore is excited to introduce the Magazine Buyer’s Club! Sign up to get each new issue of any of our featured periodicals.

The Buyer’s Club currently features six publications:

SAN ROCCO is a magazine about architecture written by architects.

THE EXHIBITIONIST is a journal for curators by curators.

PETUNIA is a feminist art & entertainment magazine.

TOILET PAPER is a magazine (but kind of an artists’ book) by Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari.

OCTOBER is an art criticism & theory heavyweight.

FILLIP is a journal of art, culture and ideas published in Vancouver, BC.

Membership gets you 10% off each magazine. We’ll let you know when a new issue arrives at the store, and keep it safe for you until you can stop by for it. Worldwide shipping is also available. Please drop us a line if you’d like to join!

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Science Fiction 21: The Last Frontier
Jacqueline Hoang Nguyen, Brian Jungen, Charles Stankievech
14 December 2013 — 19 February 2014,
Reception Friday 13 December, 8:00PM
Curated by Candice Hopkins

Exhibition extended to February 19

We are pleased to announce the exhibition The Last Frontier, the twenty-first installment of an 88-part science fiction series produced by the Or Gallery.

This exhibition is a vignette of sorts with three interrelated parts. It begins with a video by Jacqueline Hoang Nguyen entitled 1967: A People Kind of Place (2012) which centers on a specific point in the history of St. Paul, Alberta, a town located 300 kilometers north of Edmonton. Making use of archival film footage, in this collaged video a complex narrative regarding municipal and national policies and the contradictions inherent with the development of Canada’s multicultural act emerges. In 1967, in a gesture of radical hospitality, St. Paul inaugurated a UFO landing pad as a way to welcome the whole world including those from outer space. “The UFO landing pad”, writes Nguyen, “functions as a symbol for Canada’s increased emphasis on hospitality, tolerance, diversity, and unity at that point in history … a complex and paradoxical structural representation of both nationalist and anti-nationalist discourse”. 1967: A People Kind of Place also uncovers the colonial aspirations that led to the formation of St. Paul—the community was created for the purpose of assimilating Metis people into so-called “mainstream society”. After admitting the failure of this venture, the town dropped “des Metis” from its name. An enlarged backlit image of a 35mm slide of the original landing pad, empty and unoccupied, rests near the projected video. As the title of this exhibition suggests, science fiction and conceptions of space are oftentimes bound together with colonial aspirations.

Brian Jungen’s Modern Sculpture (After Iceland) (2005), is a set of amorphous forms—igneous lava rock from Iceland that the artist has covered in the outer skins of Nike soccer balls. The chrome-coloured leather obscures the inner forms, emphasizing the liquid nature of the molten lava. The sculptures appear as though they are suspended in motion, almost like drops of the element mercury, and like mercury they seem to exhibit the same uncanny pull towards the whole. One of the characteristics of the element is its strong attraction to other metals, including gold and silver; it will amalgamate them and create new hybrids, dissolving the other material the process.

Science fiction is rife with narratives of the extraordinary and the unexplained. Charles Stankievech’s Gravity’s Rainbow (2009) had its origins in a similar moment, when he noticed a chance apparition on the wall of his studio—a sliver of prismatic light that had refracted off of the surface of a vinyl record lying on his desk. Gravity’s Rainbow replicates something of the black magic of this initial inspiration: the work makes use of the vinyl grooves of Pink Floyd’s 12” record “Dark Side of the Moon” to produce a thin sliver of light that hovers on the wall, reminiscent of the rings of Saturn. “The installation’s soundtrack”, Stankievech explains, “is created by placing the needle of the turntable in the last groove of the record, which in turn produces a wash of white noise similar to the sound of background radiation of the cosmos as picked up from deep space radio telescopes”. Gravity’s Rainbow is accompanied by a few select objects: the album cover from the “Dark Side of the Moon”, a book entitled “THE UNIVERSE” from the Time LIFE series, and a photographic document of the orbiting light rings. The installation’s title is a nod to the serendipitous release of Pink Floyd’s generation-defining album in 1973, the same year that Thomas Pynchon’s equally influential book, “Gravity’s Rainbow”, was first published.

About the artists:

Brian Jungen lives and works in Vancouver and the Peace Country in northeastern British Columbia. He has exhibited nationally and internationally in major solo and group exhibitions. Using reclaimed materials and creating a hybridity of meaning in these objects, Jungen’s work evokes cultural traditions and points to the link between the social and environmental effects of our globalized trade in mass-produced objects. Solo exhibitions include National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C. (2010); Le Frac des Pays de la Loire, Carquefou, France (2009); Casey Kaplan, New York (2008); Museum Villa Stuck, Munich (2007); Catriona Jeffries, Vancouver (2007); and Tate Modern, London (2006).

Born and raised in Montreal, French-Canadian of Vietnamese origin, Jacqueline Hoang Nguyen is a research-based artist currently based in Brooklyn and Stockholm. Nguyen recently completed the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program (Studio 2010-2011). She obtained her MFA and a post-graduate diploma in Critical Studies at the Malmö Art Academy in Malmö, Sweden (2003-2005), and had previously completed her BFA degree with distinction at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada (1999-2003).

Amongst selected exhibitions, her work were shown internationally such as the ICA, Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia (2011); the Mason Gross Galleries in New Jersey (2011); the Galerie Im Regierungsviertel in Berlin (2010); Gasworks in London (2010), Pictura Gallery/Skånska Konstmuseum in Lund (2009), Cranbrook Museum in Cranbrook (2008), Rooseum Museum of Contemporary Art in Malmö (2005), and the Living Art Museum in Reykjavik (2004). Solo exhibitions include VOX: Centre de l’image contemporaine in Montreal (2012) and AXENEO7 in Ottawa (2013), in addition to participating in the group show The Last Laugh curated by Kari Cwynar at Apexart in New York (2013), to name a few.

Charles Stankievech, born in Okotoks, Canada, is based in Berlin, Germany. He has exhibited in venues such as Palais de Tokyo (Paris), International Symposium on Electronic Arts (ISEA2010, Germany), dOCUMENTA 13 (Kassel), Xth Biennale of Architecture (Venice), NGBK + HKW (Berlin), ISSUE Project Room (New York), Musèe d’art Contemporain Montreal, Canadian Centre for Architecture and MASSMoCA. In 2011 he was the West Coast/Yukon finalist for the Sobey Art Award. In 2012 he was artist-in-residence at Flaggfabrikken (Norway), MARFA Fieldwork International Research Program (Marfa, Texas). He has also held residencies with the Canadian Forces Artist Program, MuseumsQuartier (Vienna, Austria), Nodar Artist Residency Center (Portugal), Waterpod (NYC), Atlantic Center for the Arts (Florida), Banff Centre for the Arts, and artLAB San Servolo Artist Residency (Venice). His writings appear in academic journals such as Leonardo Music Journal (MIT Press) and 306090 (Princeton Architectural Press), as well as experimental texts in art publications. Since 2011, he has served as co-director of the art and theory press K.

About the curator:
Candice Hopkins, originally from Whitehorse, Yukon, is an independent curator and writer based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She has published extensively on history, art and vernacular architecture and has lectured at venues including Witte de With, Tate Modern and the Dakar Biennale. In 2012, she presented a keynote lecture on the topic of the “sovereign imagination” for dOCUMENTA 13. Her recent projects include Close Encounters: The Next 500 Years, a multi-site exhibition in Winnipeg co-curated with Steve Loft, Jenny Western and Lee-Ann Martin, and Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art, the National Gallery of Canada’s largest survey of contemporary art, co-curated with Greg Hill and Christine Lalonde. She is currently working with Lucia Sanroman, Irene Hoffmann and Janet Dees as co-curator of 2014 SITE Santa Fe biennial exhibition, Unsettled Landscapes, which opens on July 17th.

Special thanks to Catriona Jeffries, VOX Centre de l’image contemporaine and the Contemporary Art Gallery for their assistance with this exhibition.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Pattison
Garry Neill Kennedy
November 2 — December 7, 2013
Reception Friday, November 1, 8PM

The Or Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of Pattison, a new installation by renowned Halifax-based artist Garry Neill Kennedy.

Pattison is an evolution of the project Kennedy presented at G Gallery in Toronto and deals with his longtime interests in business culture, commercial signage, the interplay of corporate and personal identities, and the use of colour and typography indexed to portraiture. The large wall text painting combines the corporate word marks of Jim Pattison and Bob Rennie, two prominent business figures in Vancouver.

Garry Neill Kennedy is an artist, educator, and the former President of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD), Halifax. Kennedy has exhibited extensively and his work has been the subject of a major retrospective at the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa (2000). He was awarded the Portia White Prize by the Arts Council of Nova Scotia, (2000); the Governor General’s Awards in Visual and Media Arts, (2004); and invested as a Member of the Order of Canada, (2004). Recently, MIT Press invited Kennedy to author the book, The Last Art College, NSCAD (1968-1978), which chronicles the first ten years of his presidency.

Garry Neill Kennedy, Pattison (2013)

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



talk

VISR Lecture
Sneja Gunew
December 9 — 7:00-9:00PM, 2013

Vancouver Institute for Social Research

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, theory-based free school which began in February 2013. Its intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

The Institute’s second session will be held from October 21, 2013 until December 9, 2013.

Once a week on Monday evenings from 7-9 pm at the Or Gallery (555 Hamilton Street), we will be inviting professors to present on topics of their choice over this period. The seminar will be free to the public and all professors will be offering their services on a voluntary basis.

As we continue into our second session, we would like to take this opportunity to open up the conversation with prospective professors and students to create a sustained para-academic platform in the city.

Organized by the East Vancouver Young Hegelians – Chapter 13 (Night of the World Project – die Adlestatte faction)

The readings are posted on the VISR website:

http://visrfreeschool.wordpress.com/

Past seminars on Youtube

Oct. 21st
Logics of Violence: An Introduction

Ian Angus
SFU Humanities

I will distinguish 5 forms of violence, including discussion of the reasons for this classification and its difference from that used by other thinkers: criminality, systemic violence, metaphysical (or religious violence), revolutionary violence and the violence brought out by social disintegration. This classification will be used to suggest that each form of violence has a particular logic, such that violent events are not merely random but contain constitutive presuppositions that call for specific responses that thus generate cycles of violence. It is these cycles, or “logics of violence,” that we need to understand. Particular analysis will be given to revolutionary violence and the violence brought out by social disintegration. In conclusion, there will be some reflection on whether violence is inherent to the human condition and thereby to the possibility of non-violence.

Oct 28, 2013

Judith Roof
Rice University (Houston, TX) English

The Dangers of Homeostasis:
The Demise of the Nom-du-père

When Lacan meets Luhmann, the inevitable transcendentalism of posthumanism comes into focus. Shifting from a Freudian to a systems vocabulary offers a slightly different analysis of the stubborn resistance of structure as its binaries reemerge in renderings of the “digital,” repositionings of the paternal function, and reinscriptions of oppositional inequities. This seminar will focus on resonances from an “event” (in Badiou’s terms) or “cut” in Lacan’s in which the premise underlying metaphor (Law) disappeared, reappearing as both a silliness and paranoid knowledge. These registers operate in the same way as the hoax, patching Law with a differently-constituted mise-en-abyme.

Nov 4, 2013

Jon Beasley-Murray
UBC Spanish

“The Mexican Exception? Biopolitics, Drugs, Insurgency”

Over the past fifteen years or so, much attention has been paid to the cauldron of political experimentation that has constituted a veritable “Latin American laboratory” of social mobilization and democratic participation. From Venezuela to Bolivia, Argentina to Brazil, the old, repressive terms of the creole social contract have been challenged and renegotiated by a series of insurgencies (from the Caracazo to the Bolivian gas wars) and their respondent institutional forms (from chavismo to the MAS). Even Colombia, otherwise often the lone holdout when it comes to good news from the South, has seen novel forms of political participation and governance on the local and municipal scale, as well as moves towards a possible end to its long-running civil war.

The exception, seldom discussed in the same breath, is Mexico. Though the Mexicans have had their movements of social mobilization and radicalism, from the Zapatistas to López Obrador’s presidential campaign, any sober assessment has to admit that the country’s situation is dire and deteriorating. Violence associated with the drugs trade has led to the death of literally tens of thousands, at a rate faster and more devastating than any similar violence that the region experienced over the course of what was hardly a particularly pacific twentieth century. Despite the fact that this violence is in part a response to an increasingly assertive (and militarized) state presence at its periphery, in effect we see the state’s reach and the strength of its claims dramatically shrinking.

All this takes place in conditions of near silence and much ignorance, largely because of the breakdown of mechanisms of representation, as the press has been intimidated and essentially forced to take a blind eye to proceedings while international opinion has been largely indifferent. Yet because of the threat that the situation poses both the state and the institutions of what used to be known as civil society, it has all the hallmarks of a social insurgency, if without any promise of liberation or redemption. And international indifference is foolhardy given that Mexico is perhaps showing the way towards a new biopolitical terrain whose savagery, driven by the desire for profit (and death), is hitherto unknown in the annals of capitalism. And it may turn out to be not so exceptional after all…

This paper examines some of the practical and theoretical issues that the so-called Mexican exception raises.

Nov 11, 2013
Bo Earle
UBC English

Positive Terror: Hegel, Liberalism and Noir Aesthetics

The account that modern liberal capitalism, following Adam Smith, offers of its own history is one of emancipation, of the progressive disencumbering of atomic Cartesian subjects whose rational self-interest is fortuitously mitigated by the sympathetic imagination to the collective benefit of society at large. The otherwise inexplicable good fortune that individual liberty should be so conscientiously self-correcting Smith illustrates by citing the capacity of the bourgeois subject to imaginatively rehearse the suffering of a derelict lunatic he happens upon in the street. For Smith, self-interested rationality is corrected by its capacity to imagine its own negation. My talk introduces the alternative account of modern liberalism offered in G.W.F. Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Anticipating current influential reflections on the ethical implications of terror by figures such as Baudrillard, Sloterdijk and Zizek, Hegel does not dispute Smith’s reading of liberalism’s self-conception but offers a more expansive account of what is functionally entailed by the act of negation. The bourgeois subject stages its own negation as a spectacle that implicitly reaffirms its claim to an unencumbered, sovereign perspective. Empathy then can be seen less as mitigating possessive self-interest than fostering it, and modern liberal subjects less as mutually beneficent than mutually exclusive. Hegel deconstructs Smith’s conclusion simply by recognizing such violently antagonistic individualism for what it is, contending that terror, radically indiscriminate negation, both in the case of the French Revolution and in general, is not a contingent consequence but the essential purpose of democratic revolution and liberal progressivism generally.

A classic study of modern liberalism, Isaiah Berlin’s “Two Concepts of Liberty,” contrasts what he terms the “negative” freedom to be left alone, unencumbered and free to do whatever one happens to choose, and the “positive” freedom to pursue certain specific goods or purposes. As an ethical norm applied in the here and now, Berlin concludes that negative freedom is empty, denying real acts the kind of concrete aims they require but that only positive conceptions of freedom provide. Analogously, Hegel’s and Smith’s conceptions of liberal self-negation might be contrasted in terms of positive and negative conceptions of terror. Smith’s image of the lunatic, like negative conceptions of encumbrances to be removed, is merely one among many arbitrary examples of unfreedom that, in themselves indifferent, together confirm possession of an unencumbered perspective and of a potential for future action that escapes all such limits. Hegel treats terror not as an arbitrary object of knowledge but a singularly traumatic practical experience, symptomized aesthetically by metaphors that liken bloodletting to drinking water and beheading to cutting cabbages. Negation of Cartesian sovereignty is concretely felt effect of properly grasping such metaphors, not an edifyingly removed spectacle. Such sovereignty retains a crucial role in Hegel’s positive conception of terror; not the role of an ideologically presumed reality, but the role of a fantasy by which the real practice of modern violence is structured and haunted.

To flesh out a picture of what a liberal ethics would entail that acknowledged rather than suppressed its implication in terror, I will chart a brief history of noir aesthetics from Baudelaire’s alternative stagings of Smith’s street encounter to classical examples of film noir.

Nov 18, 2013
Geoffrey Winthrop-Young
UBC Central, Eastern, Northern European Studies

Avoid the Breath You Take: Peter Sloterdijk’s Terror from the Air

Virginia Woolf famously observed that ‘on or about December 1910 human character changed.’ The claim is both too modest and imprecise. Peter Sloterdijk — arguably the most stimulating, certainly the most controversial German philosopher — knows better. The epochal turn occurred close to the Belgian town of Ypres, on April 22, 1915, at around 5:00 PM, when the German army launched the first deadly gas attack. For Sloterdijk, this targeting of the body’s immediate environment rather than the body itself is not only a matter of military history, it dramatically highlights the key feature of the modern age: the ongoing practical and theoretical ‘explication’ of our enabling environments. Explication involves becoming aware of (and experiencing) supporting infrastructures that had long remained below the thresholds of perception. And you are never more aware of your necessity to breathe than when the very breath you take threatens to kill you. Ypres, Auschwitz, Dresden, Hiroshima and all their current successors are the ‘atmoterrorist’ equivalent of equally far-ranging scientific and artistic endeavours that characterize modernity. The structural opposite of gas warfare is the art of climate control and air conditioning. Both speak of a fundamental realignment in the ongoing intertwinedness between humans and their spaces; though to use gas war as example to discuss this development is, no doubt, a bit like explaining the principles of gravity by describing what happens to human bodies when they are thrown off a cliff.

The events of Ypres are featured in the beginning of Sloterdijk’s Terror from the Air (2009), first published as Luftbeben: An den Quellen des Terrors (literally, “Airquakes: At the Sources of Terror”) in 2002 and then again in 2004 as an introductory chapter of Schäume (“Foams”), the third volume of Sloterdijk’s trilogy Spheres. Much as the gas attack launched the Second Battle of Ypres, Terror from the Air introduces a much broader argument that brings to a close Sloterdijk’s ambitious anthropotechnical spherology. A lot can and must be said about the conceptualization of terror and terrorism in Terror from the Air (a titillating title designed to disappoint readers expecting insights into 9/11), but a lot must also be said about the philosophical, historical and biographical undergrowth of Sloterdijk’s ideas. The presentation will touch on both book and backgrounds.

Reading: Peter Sloterdijk, Terror from the Air

November 25th, 2013
Laura U Marks
SFU School for the Contemporary Arts

Aromatic Events: how plant communication makes us more than human

Plants communicate to other plants, to insects, and to animals, in many fascinating ways. We humans can cultivate our latent plant nature by trying to understand what the plants are doing. Our acts of fear and self-protection resemble those of plants and rely on plant resources; and many of the reasons we experience beauty and pleasure arise from the way plants evolved to attract pollinators. The philosophers C.S. Peirce, A.N. Whitehead, and Elizabeth Grosz will support my inquiry, as well as recent findings from plant biochemistry. To help us cultivate our plantlike qualities I will distribute olfactory items.

Dec 2, 2013:
Gareth James
UBC Art History and Visual Art Department
Description to follow

Dec 9, 2013
Sneja Gunew
UBC English and Gender Studies

Fighting Globalization with a Cosmopolitanism Yet to Come.
Sneja Gunew, University of British Columbia

Whether through global warming, economic turbulence, or acute awareness of conflict zones on the daily news, the world is currently experiencing its acute inter-connection in many aspects. But what are the conceptual terms that can help us understand this everyday reality? While we have become all too familiar with the increasing social inequalities that appear to be inherent to globalization, recent debates in cosmopolitanism offer an approach that, in the words of sociologist Gerard Delanty, creates “a condition of openness to the world … entailing self and societal transformation.” The literary critic Berthold Schoene suggests that “to call oneself a cosmopolitan involves … opening oneself up to a radical unlearning of all definitive modes of identification.” While traditional cosmopolitanism is associated with alienated mobile elites and their consumption habits the new debates over the last decade attempt to create a sense of global interconnection that perceives all cultures, groups and individuals as contributing to world knowledge. The cosmopolitan debates help generate a cultural legibility that links individuals across group identities and beyond national ties to embrace diasporic connections. For example, the term ‘vernacular cosmopolitanism’ (coined by postcolonial critic Homi Bhabha) acknowledges the global interdependence identified by the new debates in cosmopolitanism at the same time that it recognizes that these are always rooted in and permeated by local concerns attached to minority groups competing within the nation—a complex politics that includes Indigeneity. What might this new legibility comprise and to what degree does reading world literatures (and cultural texts) in new ways help us comprehend this new cosmopolitan grammar?

Contact – visrvancouver@gmail.com

Venue is wheelchair accessible.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



fundraiser

Bricks & Mortar
Vancouver Rowing Club, 450 Stanley Park Drive
Friday October 18, 6PM, 2013,

Cocktails & Preview:
Wednesday, October 16, 5-9PM
Or Gallery
555 Hamilton Street

Tickets/ $175
Tables of 10/ $1500
available at
auction.orgallery.org
or call 604.683.7395

Online auction by Paddle 8
Please visit paddle8.orgallery.org
to view auction pieces, and bid online.

Works By:
Brian Jungen, Allison Hrabluik, Jason McLean, Geoffrey Farmer, Annika Rixen, Roy Arden, Steven Brekelmans, Rodney Graham, Ian Wallace, Kyla Mallett, Laiwan, Marina Roy, Kota Ezawa, Mark Soo, Una Knox, Neil Wedman, Sydney Hermant, Hadley+Maxwell, Kathy Slade, Laura Piasta, Aaron Carpenter, Antonia Hirsch, Elizabeth Zvonar, Duane Linklater, Shannon Oksanen, Myfanwy MacLeod, Garry Neill Kennedy, Kathleen Ritter, Nicole Ondre, Luanne Martineau, Angus Ferguson, and more.

2013 marks the 30th anniversary of the Or Gallery. This significant milestone provides the opportunity to reflect on the Or’s venerable history as a space for experimental art practices, and to bring an ambitious new project to light.

The Or Gallery is raising funds to purchase a residency and studio space that will provide a flexible programming venue for talks, readings and open studios. The project reflects an early moment in the gallery’s history: from 1983—1987, the gallery’s Franklin Street location featured an adjoining apartment, allowing a succession of artists to live in the space and curate exhibitions and projects. Building on this history, the multipurpose residency space will host visiting artists, curators and writers for short or long-term stays.

The success of Vancouver’s art community has hinged on tremendous local talent, bolstered by its ability to engage with art communities beyond the city walls. This project will supplement the Or Gallery’s programming and be shared with our peer organizations, providing an important asset to welcome a large number of visitors to work in Vancouver and establish lasting connections in the city.

You can become involved. We are raising money to match $100,000 in funds generously promised by the City of Vancouver, and we need your help! Please consider attending our auction, purchasing artwork, or donating online now.

Donate to the Or Gallery now:
orgallery.org/membership

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Launch

On Labour: Ginger Goodwin Way & Night Shift LP

October 5, 7PM — 9:30PM, 2013

In conjunction with the Vancouver Art / Book Fair, Or Bookstore is pleased to launch two new publications by Or Gallery. The launch will take place at Or Bookstore, 555 Hamilton Street.

Ginger Goodwin Way is a book, edited by Jesse Birch, featuring essays by the late Jim Green, Jesse Birch and Michael Turner. The book also documents the 2010 exhibition of the same name at the Or, which featured work by Mariana Castillo Deball, Michele Di Menna, and Until We Have A Helicopter, with texts by Adam Sellen, Eric Bell, and Raymond Boisjoly. Ginger Goodwin Way was an exhibition of contemporary art that engaged with contested stories and histories: re-interpretations, misinterpretations and unofficial versions.

Jesse Birch and Michael Turner will read selections from their essays. Ginger Goodwin Way is printed and bound by Publication Studio Vancouver.

Night Shift is a 12” vinyl record by Brady Cranfield and Jamie Hilder, which documents the artists’ 2012 performance and installation at the Or Gallery. In response to the idea that titanium dioxide, the primary ingredient in white paint, is used as an indicator of economic recovery, the artists painted the walls of the gallery white every night for the duration of the exhibition. As the title implies, the artists’ labour took place at night while the gallery was closed and was performed for an amount of time equal to the gallery’s regular business hours. Several microphones recorded the sounds of the painting and were played back during the day while the gallery was open to the public. Over the course of the exhibition, as paint builds up on the wall, these sounds also accrued after each night’s work, with each subsequent track layered on top of the previous night’s recordings. Liner notes by Andrew Witt.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Plänterwald
Lynne Marsh
September 7 — October 12, 2013
Reception Friday, September 6, 8PM
Curated by Mark Lanctôt and Jonathan Middleton

Shot in an abandoned former GDR amusement park located just outside of Berlin, Plänterwald is a film about the gradual processes of decay and overgrowth. By choosing as subject a forgotten place of leisure that to this day remains gated and guarded by security guards, Lynne Marsh draws a telling parallel between the spaces of spectacle, of control and of Nature. The passage of time, as indicated by how submerged in foliage the corroding site has become, turns the fun park into a sylvan pastoral.

Captured in the process of returning to nature, the site still retains the human presence of security guards, what the artist has called “guardians of a ‘dead’ space.” As they patrol a place with no clear use or value, they become representatives of corporate law and order that offers protection without preservation. They stand idly by as the object of their surveillance slowly disappears under rampant vegetation. Is this what an eventually depleted future holds in store? Abandoned sites whose guardians, like soldiers cut off from communication lines at the end of a war, are unaware that the old order has fallen?

Plänterwald marks the first of a series of exhibitions and projects curated by Mark Lanctôt and Jonathan Middleton under the title The Troubled Pastoral. The series takes on a broad set of themes including pessimism, psychedelia, altered states and drug use, black comedy, science-fiction dystopia, class struggle (within the context of an increasingly marginal or absent middle class), the industrialization of food production, the ragged edge of suburbia, and various forms of visual, aural, or perceptual interference, including smoke, static, and electro-magnetic radiation.

A reception will also be held in conjunction with SWARM 14 on the evening of Friday, September 13th, from 7PM.

Lynne Marsh, Plänterwald (2010)Lynne Marsh, Plänterwald (2010)

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Exhibition

Death & Objects II
Emilie Halpern, Neil Goldberg, Ryan Peter, Jasmine Reimer, Major G.L. Thorton Sharp
May 25 — July 13,
Reception Friday, May 24, 8PM
Curated by Eric Fredericksen & Jonathan Middleton

The Or Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of Death & Objects II, an exhibition featuring works by Neil Goldberg, Emilie Halpern, Ryan Peter, Jasmine Reimer and Major G.L. Thornton Sharp. The exhibition takes up similar themes as Death & Objects, an exhibition at the Or Gallery that touched on the contemporary memento mori and vanitas, including subtle or abstract anthropomorphisms related to sculpture and the still life.

Death & Objects II takes a more direct approach. Works effect a one-to-one relationship in many cases and otherwise address scale and measurement. From Emilie Halpern’s Drown, a puddle of seawater equivalent to the capacity of human lungs, to the sculpture by Jasmine Reimer incorporating casts of cauliflower and the studio floor, the works are indexed to the physical world. Ryan Peter’s photogram series Untitled (AUTOGRAM), portrays what appear to be arms, legs, and other figurative elements against a series of hostile and psychedelic landscapes. While we understand these to be pictures, as with all photograms, they were created by placing objects directly on the photo paper. The title of the series conveys an additional interest in the self-descriptive.

Neil Goldberg’s My Father Breathing Into a Mirror (2005) is what it says. In a one-minute-long looping video, shot in a park with fall leaves, the artist’s father proves, over and over, that he is still breathing. The document’s irony—a proof that is unproven as soon as it is recorded, and thus past—preceded the father’s passing but is deepened by it.

Major G.L. Thornton Sharp’s Victory Square Cenotaph (1924) was erected by public subscription as a monument to Canadian dead of the Great War. Cenotaphs—monuments in the form of a tomb—were erected as war memorials in many Canadian cities in the wake of Edwin Lutyens’ influential 1919 Cenotaph in Whitehall., London. Sharp’s Cenotaph takes the odd form of a truncated obelisk, triangular in plan to suit the shape of the surrounding square. Its inscription, drawn from Lamentations 1:12, is remarkably in-your-face in its address. Walking south across the park from the Or, you read “IS IT NOTHING TO YOV.” If the direct address is not clear enough, the next face clarifies its object: “ALL YE WHO PASS BY.” Finally, the main face, toward Cambie, declares “THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR EVERMORE,” though no names bedeck the monument—a clear difference between it and more contemporary monuments. Its anachronistic insistence on giving death a collective meaning and its retention in collective memory is striking today, while its paradoxical form—not quite cenotaph, not quite obelisk—would have pleased late-20th century postmodern architects. For the purposes of the current exhibition at the Or, we simply underline its transitive function: a monument representing a singular tomb, but standing at the head of no grave, insisting through its formal aspect and its hortatory engravings the reality of mass sacrifice and the necessity of its remembrance.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free



Screening

James Benning, Michael Snow
Clamour and Toll: Films
March 18th, 7:30pm

Curated by Eli Bornowsky

NOTE: Screenings are held at DIM Cinema at the Pacific Cinémathèque Pacifique at 1131 Howe St.
Screenings are 18yrs+
Tix $11/$9+ $3membership
thecinematheque.ca
dimcinema.ca

James Benning
Twenty Cigarettes, USA 2011. HD, 99 mins.

Michael Snow
New York Eye and Ear Control, Canada 1964. 16mm, 34 mins.

Produced in partnership with DIM Cinema and the Pacific Cinémathèque.

There is an operation in certain works of art where the hierarchy of the composition is unclear, offering the viewer the agency to compose her interpretation of the work experientially. We could call this operation something like subjective-manoeuvring. Ultimately it is the experience of freedom. I first experienced this through listening to music; however, because the operation is formal and perceptual, it is not medium specific. It also operates in great films, from Tarkovsky to Tati. It also informs my practice as a painter.

With this in mind, Clamour and Toll contrasts the austerity of James Benning’s Twenty Cigarettes with the cacophony of Michael Snow’s New York Eye and Ear Control. It may seem unusual to contrast free jazz bohemianism in New York with straight prairie portraits, but the contrast in content and context illustrates one strategy to facilitate subjective-manoeuvring that I prize: discord.
I admire these two artists and these rigorous films because they present a challenge: they are difficult to watch. But this difficulty only presents a challenge to how we think about looking. For if we really look, the freedom we experience far surpasses the discomfort.

Total approximate running time: 133 mins.

Clamour and Toll is an ongoing series of performance, sound art, and moving images. Each event explores the relation between sensation and intellection of contrasting artistic mediums and experimental practices.


< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Admission Free