Launch

Berlin 2013/1983
Daniel Young and Christian Giroux
February 8, 6 — 8 PM, 2018

The Or Gallery and Or Bookstore are pleased to present a launch for the artists’ book Berlin 2013/1983, by Canadian artists Daniel Young and Christian Giroux. Young and Giroux will be joined in conversation with Scott Watson at the Or Gallery on February 8, 6-8PM.

Berlin 2013/1983 is an attempt to answer two interrelated research questions: what does one year of new building construction in a city look like, and how does this contemporary city compare to that of a generation earlier? Berlin is an intriguing case study, not least because of the changing geo-politics altering the urban fabric of both East and West Berlin. With encyclopedic pretension, the artists attempted to document every building completed in Berlin in 2013 presented alongside buildings erected one generation (approximately 30 years) earlier.

Devised as an imaging machine to destroy other images, Berlin 2013/1983 counteracts the usual Berlin narratives in its analytical approach and presentation of its 784 building “pairs.” The artists began by photographing subjects at the northwest edge of the city and then traced a path that covers the entire urban area by zig zagging east and west following a boustrophedonic (as “the ox plows”) pattern, a process that began in February and ended in May of 2015. Rather than emphasizing a historical (centralized) or a modern (radial) urban development, the project’s radically democratic form gives the periphery of the city the same value as the centre. The iconic buildings of Berlin-Mitte are only found in the middle of the book and are lost among the sheer abundance of images of new suburban structures within this non-hierarchical inventory of architectural form, format, and function.

Inspired in part by the tradition of conceptual photography projects dedicated to architectural knowledge, Berlin 2013/1983 was conceived as a rigorous dérive and is a radical addition to the architectural discourse and published guides to buildings in Berlin. What was devised as a materialist case study in the political economy of construction of our contemporary moment—and of the just recent past—develops into a study of a local vernacular unfolding over time.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Project

Afterlives Extensions: (currency)
Germaine Koh and Aron Louis Cohen, with Russell Gordon
January 25 — 31, 2018

Curated by Joni Low

Cathedral Square Park
January 25 – 27; & January 30 – 31: 12 to 4 pm
Onsite Smelting: Saturday January 27, 2 to 5 pm

Free to the public


As part of the exhibition Afterlives, Aron Louis Cohen and Germaine Koh will perform (currency) at Cathedral Square Park, transforming Koh’s new mobile structure, Home Made Home: Boothy, into a currency exchange.1 The public is invited to bring small, unwanted electronic items – such as computers and peripherals, cell phones, TVs or home appliances – in exchange for (currency) extracted from its parts.

Koh and Cohen will create ad-hoc coins from electronic waste – stamped, registered and available in exchange for more e-waste. They will dismantle objects in the booth, exposing the labour often outsourced to city perimeters and developing countries. On Saturday, January 27, in collaboration with Russell Gordon and his portable foundry, the artists will pour
(currency) onsite.

(currency) considers the range of values represented in technological objects designed for obsolescence. How do currencies and these electronic devices act as support structures for social and material relations? What are the disparities between use-value and exchange-value, and how might they be bridged? By examining the relationship between materials, the symbolism assigned to them, and their circulation – through purchase, recycling, or disposal – the project questions the logic of “value.” Ironically, while wealth becomes consolidated among the few, “waste” has become abundant, even excessive.

Value today is often linked to a material’s scarcity and necessity – associated with its level of manufacture, its functionality in combination with other materials as consumer goods, and social consensus. Manufacturing produces objects essential to our functioning within technologized society. Computers, phones, laptops and tablets include a number of refined metals, such as gold, silver, copper, aluminum, niobium and rare-earth metals. These elements can be re-extracted from e-waste after its social and functional value approaches nil.

The de-linking of currency from a material standard almost fifty years ago, and the continued abstraction of capital, is part of a wider neoliberal deregulation of the economy, welfare state and public life. In an era of precarity, speculative cryptocurrencies, mass inflation, and rising debt, it becomes apparent that material “waste” is also a wealth – of debt, certainly to our earth. How might we invert “value,” and conceive of “waste” and its potentials differently – so as to imagine different possible futures?

1 Home Made Home: Boothy is a small, mobile aluminum structure by Germaine Koh designed to create a public point for exchange, communication, presentation and shelter. Resembling 1950s telephone booths common to urban vernacular (until the removal of public payphones) and popular culture (from Superman to The Matrix), Boothy is a platform to transform social relations. Its etymology and spirit relates to the Scottish/Gaelic bothy: a rustic wilderness hut governed by a code of shared use. It is the 9th iteration of Koh’s Home Made Home series, a creative enterprise for building innovative small dwellings to imagine other possible ways of living.

HMH: Boothy is a younger cousin to Shell (2006), a transit shelter-like enclosure attached to a Vancouver gallery storefront which exposed the vulnerability of space and the power relations that private and public imply. Unmoored from gallery space into public space, Boothy will host a series of monthly public art projects presented in Cathedral Square Park from January to June 2018, curated by Joni Low.

The Or Gallery acknowledges its presence on unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh territories. This project series is made possible through the generous support of the City of Vancouver’s Public Art Program. We are grateful for the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Government of British Columbia, the City of Vancouver, the British Columbia Arts Council, our members, donors, and volunteers. The Or Gallery is a member of the Pacific Association of Artist-Run Centres (PAARC).

Image credit: Germaine Koh, Aron Louis Cohen and Russell Gordon, Currency: First smelt, 2017. Aluminum, copper, heat and labour. Photographs: Aron Louis Cohen.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event


Fillip Presents Chris Kraus

Western Front
303 8th Avenue East
Vancouver, British Columbia

Join Fillip and Los Angeles–based writer Chris Kraus on Saturday, January 20, at 6 pm at the Western Front, Vancouver, for a lecture on the life and work of avant-garde writer Kathy Acker. Presented in collaboration with the Western Front’s ongoing Scrivener’s Monthly series and a Fillip Reading Group with Kraus on January 21, this talk will highlight work from Kraus’s new book After Kathy Acker: A Literary Biography, which uses exhaustive archival research and ongoing conversations with mutual colleagues and friends to trace the contradictions and depth of Acker’s life and work.

Entrance is free. Doors will open at 5:30 pm. Copies of After Kathy Acker will be for sale at the event through the Or Gallery Bookstore. Additional support provided by SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement.

Chris Kraus is the author of the bestselling novel I Love Dick, “the most important book written about men and women in the last century” (Guardian), as well as Aliens and Anorexia (Semiotext(e), 2000), Torpor (Semiotext(e), 2006), Summer of Hate (Semiotext(e), 2012), and two books of cultural criticism. She was a 2016 Guggenheim Fellow and teaches writing at the European Graduate School, Switzerland. Kraus is a co-editor, with Hedi El Kholti and Sylvere Lotringer, of Semiotext(e) and lives in Los Angeles.

This talk is presented in conjunction with the recent release of Hotel Theory Reader, the fourth title in Fillip’s ongoing Folio Series presenting writing by critics, artists, and curators that engages specific and recurring questions on international contemporary art. This anthology explores the possibilities of theory as an art form, bringing together ideas initially explored in an exhibition organized in 2015 at REDCAT | CalArts’ Downtown Center for Contemporary Arts. The book assembles a collection of texts by David Antin, Art & Language, Ruth Estévez, Bruce Hainley, Wayne Koestenbaum, Chris Kraus, Snejanka Mihaylova, Sohrab Mohebbi, Cally Spooner, V-Girls, Danna Vajda, and Tirdad Zolghadr.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton Street.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

Vancouver launch of Collection/Correction
Andrew James Patterson and Jacob Korczynski
Tuesday, January 16, 6–8 PM, 2018

Please join us for the Vancouver launch of Collection/Correction, a survey of the writings of the Toronto-based interdisciplinary artist Andrew James Paterson, edited by the independent curator Jacob Korczynski and co-published by Kunstverein Toronto & Mousse Publishing, with design by Laura Pappa & Lotte Lara Schröder.

For the launch, Jacob Korczynski will present a reading from the Collection/Correction and screen four short videos by Paterson – The Walking Philosopher (2001), Eating Regular (2004), 12 × 26 (2008), and Passing (2013) – whose scripts are included in the survey along with a series of new and recent poems and four of Paterson’s fictocriticism texts, originally published in IMPULSE in the 80s.

Korczynski is also in Vancouver for the exhibition going to go out now, featuring the work of Ellie Epp and Juliette Blightman, which he guest curated at Western Front. going to go out now opens Jan 18 at 7:00pm and runs from Jan 19 to Feb 24, 2018. Please click here for more information.

Andrew James Paterson (b. Toronto, 1952) is an interdisciplinary artist working with video, film, music, performance and writing. He has exhibited and performed his works since 1979; and ‘Collection/Correction’ marks the first survey of his practice. All of his work, regardless of discipline, shares concerns with language, bodies, and technologies; as well as a fascination with shifting paradigms between public and private realms. His writing has been published by YYZ Books, IMPULSE Magazine, FUSE Magazine, PUBLIC and FILE, amongst others. His videos have been presented internationally, including DokFest in Kassel, Germany; EXPERIMENTA in Bangalore, India; EXIS in Seoul, South Korea; MIX in New York, USA; and at the Images Festival and Inside Out in Toronto amongst many other venues. His video work is distributed by Vtape. He was a founding member of the influential band The Government and is currently a member of DERWATT. His novelette Not Joy Division will be launched in January 2018.

Jacob Korczynski is an independent curator based in Toronto. He has curated projects for the Stedelijk Museum, Mercer Union, If I Can’t Dance I Don’t Want to Be Part of Your Revolution, Oakville Galleries and the Badischer Kunstverein, and his writing has been published by art-agenda, Flash Art, Girls Like Us, Little Joe and Code South Way. A tear forms along the seam, his Classroom programme for Art & Education is now online.

Production of Collection/Correction was made possible by the generous support of the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council.

Image courtesy Printed Matter.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



bookstore

New Year's Sale

January 10 — February 3, 2018

The Or Bookstore is having its annual sale, on until February 3. Buy one book and get 5% off, two books for 10% off and three or more for 15%!

Includes all new arrivals from Broken Dimanche Press, Archive Books, K. Verlag, and more.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



fundraiser

Aura Gallery: A Fundraiser for the Or Gallery

Friday December 8 — 7-10 PM, 2017

Entry: free for Or Gallery members. Buy or renew an Or Gallery membership at the door. See membership levels and prices here

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

“What’s your astrological sign?” said Adorno, never.

Artists will transform into augurs and soothsayers for a night to offer you a glimpse into 2018 and beyond. All you have to do is believe…
and become an Or Gallery member to support our future programming.

With Sylvain Sailly, Julian Hou, Derya Akay, Stacey Ho, Meichen Waxer and others.

Fortune cookies authored by Steffanie Ling.

Beware the lurking skeptics! They go by the names of Brady or Brynn, and have been pressed into the service of refreshments for their stubborn disbelief.

We predict you will be there.

The Or Gallery’s winter exhibition, Afterlives: Germaine Koh & Aron Cohen, will be on view for extended hours during this event.

The Or Gallery acknowledges its presence on unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh territories.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



News

Aura Gallery Fundraiser | Seasonal Hours | Buy Books

Fundraiser: Dec. 8, 7pm. Break: Dec. 17 to Jan. 9. — Extended Hours: Dec. 14, until 8pm., 2017

Please come to our Aura Gallery fundraiser and membership drive this Friday, December 8, at 7pm. Entry: free for Or Gallery members. Buy or renew an Or Gallery membership at the door. See membership levels and prices here. Read more about Aura Gallery here.

The Or Gallery will be closed for a ‘seasonal break’ from December 17, 2017, to January 9, 2018. Our regular hours will resume on Tuesday, January 9, 2018. Afterlives, featuring Germaine Koh and Aron Louis Cohen and curated by Joni Low, runs until Saturday, February 3, 2018. Read more about Afterlives here.

The Or Bookstore would like to remind you that books are excellent gifts. We’ll be open extended hours on Thursday, December 14, until 8pm, but you’re last chance to grab something from us before our ‘seasonal break’ is Saturday, December 16.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

Afterlives
Germaine Koh and Aron Louis Cohen
November 25, 2017 — February 3, 2018
Reception Friday November 24, 8PM
Curated by Joni Low

Conversation with artists: November 25, 2PM

Additional programs to come in 2018

Things fall apart and are forgotten; sometimes they re-form in unexpected ways.

Technologies old and new signify a human desire to understand, interface with and possess the world. Material intermediaries, often supports to human activity, tend to be hidden, made supplementary, or discarded after their intended use. Communication technologies transmit messages, providing conduits and thresholds between interiors and exteriors: between selves, things and worlds. Today, such technologies oscillate between material and deceivingly immaterial. Digital repositories of collective experience and memory – second worlds, second lives – have become mediated aleatory streams for accelerated knowing.

Afterlives contemplates these technologies and their communicative properties, contemporary disconnection from material realities, and the care for materials once conceived as waste. Germaine Koh and Aron Louis Cohen examine and re-form material detritus and the traces of global economies to convey plasticity and potential. Electronic waste, takeaway plastics, tourist merchandise, and the enclosures and supports of industrialized logistics all undergo transformation. Speculating on origins and circulations of these materials amidst a culture of planned obsolescence, they seek to better understand the intersections of energies – time, labour, emotion, power – embedded within our late-capitalist experience. Afterlives considers the hidden processes that manufacturing and its related waste often obscure, prompting questions of value, use, and trust in encountering the world.

The mysterious back-end of production reveals political and geographic imbalances in human systems of creation and disposal. Paradoxically, our present access to this information often requires the very processes that are harming others and the world. If external forms suggest what is unseen, and if signal and thing are bound by shared material processes; if plasticity is the capacity to give and receive form – between things, each other, the world – then how might we commune with the material and human world to learn and understand differently?

… How too, might we become something else?

—-

Germaine Koh is an internationally active Canadian visual artist based in Vancouver BC. Her practice is concerned with the significance of everyday exchanges, familiar objects and common places. Koh has been a recipient of the Shadbolt Foundation VIVA Award and a finalist for the Sobey Art Award. She is also an independent curator and a partner in the independent record label weewerk. Her current ongoing projects include League (2012 -), which gathers people to play invented sports and games as a practice of creative problem-solving, and Home Made Home (2014 -), a creative enterprise for building innovative small dwellings to imagine other possible ways of living.

Aron Louis Cohen is an artist working in San Francisco. His work explores technology and craft production, and is informed by his role as an art conservationist. Cohen has participated in artist residencies at KALA Art Institute (Berkeley, CA), Wave Hill (Bronx, NY), and The Center for Book Arts (New York, NY). Recent exhibitions include Mage at radiator gallery (2017: Queens, NY), Not Curated (2017: Bushwick Open Studios, NY), and Landslide/Possible Futures (2013-14: Markham, ON and Shenzhen, China), for which he grew and transformed a field of flax into books. Cohen received a BFA in Photography from Rhode Island School of Design and a MFA from Parsons, The New School for Design.

Joni Low is a writer and curator in Vancouver. She is the 2017 curator-in-residence at Or Gallery, where her projects include Charles Campbell’s Actor Boy: Travels in Birdsong (2017: Flotilla); Underground in the Aether, a symposium on existence within changing communication circuits (2017: VIVO, Burnaby Art Gallery); and Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau: 5 Tableaux (It Bounces Back) (2016). She is a member of the Doryphore Independent Curators Society.

—-

The Or Gallery acknowledges its presence on unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh territories. For this exhibition, we thank the Canada Council for the Arts Grants to Culturally Diverse Curators for Residencies in the Visual Arts.

Image: Aron Louis Cohen, Unmaking Time, Forward and Reverse, 2012 / 2017.
Duraclear prints, wire binding stainless steel, LED light. 5” x 24” x 12”
Courtesy of the artist.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Panel

Fall Panels and Public Project by Rolande Souliere

October 25 — 26, 2017, 2017

In October, the Or Gallery invites visiting and local speakers for two evenings of informal discussion and presentations on anticolonial work and methods in cooperation with the Critical + Creative Social Justice Studies Cluster (UBC), Vivian Ziherl / Frontier Imaginaries Ed. 3: Toxic Assets, and SFU School for the Contemporary Arts Audain Visual Artist in Residence Program. These events will take place at 555 Hamilton Street.

Further afield, artist Rolande Souliere’s public poster series Coyote Responds: I Like America and America Likes Me, commissioned by the Or Gallery, will be visible in Vancouver, Toronto, and Berlin city streets throughout October.

October 25, 7pm Firestorms: Anticolonial Methods

In the first iteration of the Critical + Creative Social Justice Studies Cluster’s series of Elemental Panels, six panelists will discuss their work through the lens of fire and discuss the theme, “Firestorms: Anticolonial Methods.”

Participants:
Richard Bell (artist, activist)
Bracken Hanuse Corlett (artist, writer, performer)
Cecily Nicholson (poet, 2017 SFU Writer in Residence)
Jen Sungshine (artist, filmmaker, activist)
Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn (faculty, SFU archaeology & First Nations studies)
Moderated by Dr. Phanuel Antwi (assistant professor of English, UBC)

Bios

UBC Social Justice Institute’s (SJI) Anticolonial Methods is a series of events, panels, workshops, screenings, and writings as well as other possible forms, in which the synergies and tensions between critical and creative work are explored. This includes work that engages ongoing colonial and racial violence in their various—total, symbolic, subtle, overt, unexpected, quotidian, casual, official—modes of actualisation.

The Elemental Panels program assembles academics, artists, and activists whose contributions to critical racial, anticolonial, and feminist thought and practice draw from the signifying richness of the elements—air, water, fire, and earth.The hope is to create space for, and to support, conversations that spark the imagination and sustain all emergent and possible anticolonial practices.

October 26th, 7pm, Lay of the Land: Two projects in process

Am Johal and Rachel O’Reilly will discuss their ongoing work examining ecologies of extraction and accumulation that underscore regimes of settler colonial citizenship and the destruction and dispossession of First Nations territories in Canada and Australia.

Rachel O’Reilly’s ongoing work, The Gas Imaginary, emerged as a research project in aesthetics/poetics to explore the forms and norms of “unconventional” gas extraction (fracking). This includes a continuity with, and differencing from, modernist mining regimes, as it has rolled out internally to the indebted settler colonial states of the West, from its Halliburton centre, averting clean air and water acts wherever it is installed. The project takes on different media—poetry, collaborative drawing, installation, and theory and film history lectures—and moves between site-specificity and conceptual generalizations, depending on the aspect of her research for which she is seeking to find a form.

The Gas Imaginary will next appear as a publication from Archive Books and as a filmwork.

Am Johal’s theoretical work explores the political and philosophical implications posed by the ecological shifts driven by capital. His publication, Ecological Metapolitics: Badiou and the Anthropocene (2015), is based on his dissertation at the European Graduate School, and argues for “the invention of a new modern tradition for ecology” in acknowledgement of the incongruous relationship between the initial ideals versus the contemporary applications of political philosophy, environmental ethics, democracy, and human rights rooted in democratic materialism.

His forthcoming publication, co-authored with Matt Hern (with contributions from Joe Sacco), is the road trip theory book, Global Warming and the Sweetness of Life: A Tar Sands Tale (2018).

Bios

Rolande Souliere, Coyote Responds: I Like America and America Likes Me, series of three posters
Curated by Jonathan Middleton

Intended to haunt events and centers associated with the production and presentation of contemporary art, Souliere’s work features black and white reproductions of three faces obscured by colourfully patterned beadwork. Her defacement of these portraits leaves enough visible clues for an eye familiar with the most limited canons of Euro-American modern art to recognize the images of Joseph Beuys, Jackson Pollock, and Pablo Picasso. These artists are firmly entrenched in art history in part due to their essentializing and pilfering of the aesthetic forms and cultures of Indigenous groups.

Souliere engages the defacing of portraits as a near ubiquitous form of political and social critique. Each image is framed in her signature high-visibility traffic tape motif.

Full Bio

Posters will be visible around the Vancouver Art Book Fair, Art Toronto and Berlin galleries throughout October.

Biographies

Dr. Phanuel Antwi is Assistant Professor of English at University of British Columbia. He writes, researches, and teaches critical black studies; settler colonial studies; black Atlantic and diaspora studies; Canadian literature and culture since 1830; critical race, gender, and sexuality studies; and material cultures. He has published articles in Interventions, Affinities, and Studies in Canadian Literature, and he is completing a book-length project titled, Currencies of Blackness: Faithfulness, Cheerfulness and Politeness in Settler Writing.

Richard Bell is a member of the Kamilaroi, Kooma, Jiman, and Gurang Gurang communities. He lives and works as an activist and artist in Brisbane, Australia. Selected solo and group exhibitions include Richard Bell: Imagining Victory, Western Plains Cultural Centre, Dubbo (2015); Embassy, Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts, Perth (2014); and Uz vs Them, which toured North America between 2011 and 2013. He participated in the Asian Art Biennial, Taiwan (2013); Fifth Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art, Moscow (2013); Half-Light: Portraits from Black Australia, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (2008); Culture Warriors: National Indigenous Art Triennial, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra (2007); and the Biennale of Sydney (2008 and 1992). His work is held in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; and other Australian state and regional galleries.

Bracken Hanuse Corlett is a Northwest Coast interdisciplinary artist, writer, and performer hailing from the Wuikinuxv and Klahoose Nations. His work addresses themes of cultural reclamation and survival, identity politics, hybridity, and decolonization. Much of his work relates to his Northwest Coast Indigenous roots and his interest in the stories, language, songs, and art of his people, as well as international art and cultural forms. He has exhibited and performed in Vancouver, the Okanagan, Chicago, and Oregon. A recent graduate of the En’owkin Centre for Indigenous Art, he also studied visual art at UBC – Okanagan.

Cecily Nicholson is the 2017 Writer in Residence at Simon Fraser University. Her publications include Triage (2011) and From the Poplars (2014), winner of the 2015 Dorothy Livesay Prize for Poetry. Nicholson also contributed to Anamnesia: Unforgetting (VIVO Media Arts, 2012). She is a member of the Joint Effort prison abolitionist group and of the Research Ethics Board for Emily Carr University. She is the administrator of artist-run centre Gallery Gachet, and since 2000 has worked in the Downtown Eastside neighborhood of Vancouver, British Columbia, Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh territories.

Jen Sungshine is a queer Taiwanese artist-activist based in Vancouver, BC. She is guided by an ethos of care that is rooted in the ancestral lands of the Coast Salish people. A facilitator by trade, she works with creative technology and social justice media through Love Intersections, Our City of Colours, Out in Schools, and the Social Justice Institute at the University of British Columbia. Jen’s artistic practice involves learning through unlearning; and instead of calling you out, she wants to call you in to make artful social change with her.

Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn (Otahkotskina) is from the Piikani First Nation. He was appointed to faculty at Simon Fraser University in 2002 where he teaches archaeology and First Nations studies. He was instrumental in establishing the Department of First Nations Studies in 2012 and was its first chair. He is a long-time member of the Canadian Archaeological Association and served on its executive committee as President (2010–12). His research program brings him back to the Piikani First Nation each summer to conduct work on historical and contemporary manifestations of Piikani culture.

Am Johal graduated magna cum laude from the European Graduate School in Switzerland with a doctorate in media philosophy, where he studied with Alain Badiou, Giorgio Agamben, and others. He works as Director of Simon Fraser University’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement in the SFU Woodward’s Cultural Unit in Vancouver, Canada.

Rachel O’Reilly is an Australian-born, Berlin-based poet, critic, independent curator, and researcher whose work explores relationships between art and situated cultural practice, media and psychoanalysis, aesthetic philosophy, and political economy. From 2004-08 she was curator of Film, Video and New Media at the Gallery of Modern Art / Australian Cinematheque in Brisbane, where she was also a member of the Asia Pacific Triennial curatorial team. From 2013-14 she was a researcher in residence at the Jan van Eyck Academie, Netherlands, and she is currently Seminar Leader for ‘At the Limits of the Writerly’, How to Do Things with Theory program, Dutch Art Institute, Netherlands.

Rolande Souliere is a member of the Michipicoten First Nation, born in Toronto, Canada, and currently living in Sydney, Australia. In 2016 she received her PhD from the Sydney College of the Arts, University of Sydney. A selection of Souliere’s international solo, group, and collaborative exhibitions include Sydney Non Objective (2015), the cross-Canada touring exhibition Beat Nation (2012-2014), the Australia-wide touring exhibition Alterbeast (2014), Scotiabank Nuit Blanche Toronto (2010), and Point of Origin (2008) at Artspace, Sydney. Her public art commissions include Bringing Back Wabakinine (2015) in the Bala Underpass, Toronto, and a forthcoming public artwork commissioned by the Winnipeg Art Council.

Or Gallery acknowledges its presence on unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh territories.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

EVENT UPDATE: Fillip Presents Chris Kraus
October 16, 6PM

Event Update: We are sorry to say that due to unforeseen circumstances, Chris Kraus will not be able to travel to Vancouver.

In lieu of a public lecture, we will be screening two rarely seen Kathy Acker films* Monday, October 16, at 6:00 pm at the Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre.

“Blue Tape” (1974, 55 min)
w/ Alan Sondheim
“Adult Life of Toulouse Lautrec” (1977, 15 min)
Reading at the Western Front

Entrance is free. Doors will open at 5:30 pm. Copies of After Kathy Acker and other titles by Chris Kraus will be for sale at the event through the Or Gallery Bookstore.

When hope to reschedule Chris Kraus’s trip to Vancouver in the coming months. Our apologies for the inconvenience.

*Explicit content, discretion advised.

- – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - –

Chris Kraus on Kathy Acker

Join Fillip and Los Angeles–based writer Chris Kraus on Monday, October 16, at 6 pm at the Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre, Vancouver, for a lecture on the the life and work of avant-garde writer Kathy Acker. Presented in collaboration with SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement and with a Fillip Reading Group on October 17 at the Western Front, this talk will highlight work from Kraus’s new book After Kathy Acker: A Literary Biography which uses exhaustive archival research and ongoing conversations with mutual colleagues and friends to trace the contradictions and depth of Acker’s life and work.

Entrance is free but space is limited. Doors will open at 5:30 pm. Copies of After Kathy Acker will be for sale at the event through the Or Gallery Bookstore.

Chris Kraus is the author of the bestselling I Love Dick, “the most important book written about men and women in the last century” (Guardian), as well as Aliens and Anorexia (Semiotext(e), 2000), Torpor (Semiotext(e), 2006), Summer of Hate (Semiotext(e), 2012), and two books of cultural criticism. She was a 2016 Guggenheim Fellow and teaches writing at the European Graduate School, Switzerland. Kraus is a co-editor, with Hedi El Kholti and Sylvere Lotringer, of Semiotext(e) and lives in Los Angeles.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

Book Launch & Cocktails: 5 Tableaux (It Bounces Back)
Saturday October 14, 6-8PM

Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau

In conjunction with the 2017 Vancouver Art/Book Fair and Artists’ Books Week

Artists will be in attendance

Please join us to celebrate the launch of a limited-edition book on 5 Tableaux (It Bounces Back), a performance and installation by Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau presented at the Or Gallery (2016) and La Fonderie Darling (2015).

With essays by curators Joni Low and Anne-Marie St-Jean Aubre, the book includes a conversation with the artists on performativity, labour, material agency and decay, and the deeper personal and political underpinnings of their engagements with entropy and colour.

Designed by Eli Bornowsky in an edition of 150, with silkscreen paper and images from the performance.

Special cocktails served! Stop by after the VA/BF and before its After Party (163 West Pender).

The artists will also be at the VA/BF on October 14, 3–5PM for a special signing.

5 Tableaux (It Bounces Back) is available to purchase online here.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

2017 Vancouver Art/Book Fair

October 14 — 15, 2017
Reception and Member's Preview October 13, 6-8PM

The Or Gallery is pleased to be returning to the Vancouver Art Book Fair!

The Vancouver Art Book Fair —Canada’s first and longest-running international art book fair—returns to the Vancouver Art Gallery from October 13 to 15, 2017. Opening with the Member’s Preview and open Reception on October 13, the fair runs from 12pm to 6pm on Saturday and Sunday, is free and open to the public and showcases the work of over 100 publishers and artists through exhibitor booths, hourly talks, performances and artists’ projects.

At the heart of the fair is a selection of local, national and international artists, illustrators, designers, publishers, collectives and artist-run centres who display books, magazines, zines, chapbooks and print ephemera. With such an array of exhibitors, guests are guaranteed to discover artists, writers, publishers and/or publications they have not encountered previously.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Project

Actor Boy: Travels in Birdsong
Charles Campbell
September 21 — 24, 2017 at Flotilla

Curated by Joni Low

Location: 141 Kent Street, Charlottetown, PE

Installation open: September 22 – 24

Performance: Friday September 22, 8:30-10:30PM

View Flotilla schedule for full details

Presented by the Or Gallery and Confederation Centre Art Gallery

Why birdsong? we ask Actor Boy. He tells us of the songbird’s rapid decline; their absent voices pointing to something we must pay attention to. He draws links between ecological and cultural ruptures, and between human and animal migrations both instinctual and forced. He reminds us, in ways we do not expect, that endangerments and perceived absences require closer consideration – as do their reappearances. And that time is the medium of sound.

Actor Boy is a character from an alternate future conceived by artist Charles Campbell. With roots in the Jamaican emancipation celebration Jonkonnu – a carnivalesque event known for disrupting the social order of plantation society – Actor Boy is both witness and instigator, a six-dimensional being capable of folding and travelling time. Tapping into lines of flight, where thresholds between dimensions are crossed and an array of possibilities open, he brings these aspirations to the present, manifesting alternative possible futures.

For Flotilla, Campbell will present Actor Boy: Travels in Birdsong, a sound installation and performance responding to migrations and settlements up the Atlantic coast, and the emergence and disappearance of early black communities across Canada. Actor Boy will investigate the Bog, Charlottetown’s often-forgotten African Islander and mixed-race community that emerged in the early 1800s, and dispersed within a century.

For the September 22 performance, Actor Boy will delve into a space of violence, complicity and ecological and cultural disruption, interrogating collected memories to ask: what forces led to the historical erasures of communities, and to their reappearance? How can we find continuities within disruptions?

Charles Campbell is a Jamaican-born multidisciplinary artist, writer and curator. He has curated exhibitions in the UK, Canada and Jamaica including Anything With Nothing: Art From the Streets of Urban Jamaica at the National Gallery of Jamaica where he was Chief Curator. His work has been exhibited at the Havana Biennial, the Santo Domingo Biennial, the Cuenca Biennial, Brooklyn Museum, Alice Yard, the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, Puerto Rico, the Houston Museum of African American Culture and Rideau Hall, Ottawa. He has written for numerous publications including Frieze and ARC Magazine, a Caribbean arts journal. Campbell holds an MFA from Goldsmith College and a BFA from Concordia University. His work is concurrently on view in Relational Undercurrents: Contemporary Art of the Caribbean Archipelago at the Museum of Latin American Art in Los Angeles. He lives and works in Victoria BC.

Flotilla is the 2017 iteration of a biannual convening of Canadian artist-run centres hosted by the Atlantic Association of Artist-Run Centres.

Image: Song Catching – The Bog, 2017.
Photo by Marsha Gallant

Download the Essay Booklet here.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Project

Nautilus Bookstore

September 21 — 24, 2017

In partnership with Flotilla, the Or Gallery is pleased to present Nautilus, a pop-up Or Bookstore, from September 21-24 in Charlottetown, PEI.

Like the Or Gallery bookstore, Nautilus specializes in artists’ publishing, and features a range of books and printed mater including artists’ books, zines, design publications, local and small-press publishing, criticism and theory, and periodicals. Many of the publications on display were sourced through an open call for artists’ publishing, with responses from artists and artist-run centres from across Canada.

Hours: 12:00-5:00PM daily; also open for special events

Location: 150 Kent Street, Charlottetown, PEI

Friday, September 21

  • Verticale – Reading Club (9:00 – 11:00AM)
  • AdMare – Songlines Publication Presentation (8:30 – 9:30PM)

Saturday, September 22

  • Orgazing by Maryse Larivière – Book Launch (3:00 – 4:00PM)
  • Verticale & Donnalee Downe – Reading Club (4:00 – 5:00PM)
  • ARCA’s Grey Guide – Book Launch (5:30-6:30PM)
  • Journée sans culture – Launch (6:30 – 7:30PM)

Flotilla is the 2017 iteration of a biannual convening of Canadian artist-run centres hosted by the Atlantic Association of Artist-Run Centres.

Presented in collaboration with ARCA.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

Flowers for Africa
Kapwani Kiwanga
September 9 — October 14, 2017, 2017
Reception Friday, September 8, 8PM

Organized by Kathleen Ritter
Conversation Saturday, September 9, 2017 at 2PM

Tunis, Tunisia, March 1956. The leader of the Neo Destour Party, Habib Bourguiba, on his return from Paris after signing the Franco-Tunisian Common Protocol, addresses a crowded stadium celebrating Tunisia’s independence. As he speaks into the microphone, his lapel is decorated by a simple boutonnière, an adornment signaling this as a special occasion. This image is captured on screen from grainy black-and-white footage sourced in the British Pathé newsreel “Tunisia Receives Her Independence”.

Through extensive research into archives related to decolonization, artist Kapwani Kiwanga locates images such as these representing defining moments of independence in countries throughout the African continent. Each image features, to a greater or lesser extent, a floral arrangement—perhaps the only common element to be sourced across a range of ceremonial occasions recognizing the decolonization of Africa. These arrangements range from a boutonnière to an elaborate bouquet.

Kiwanga then takes these images to a local florist in order to recreate the bouquets as closely as possible to the archival images. The fresh arrangements are displayed in a gallery and left to wilt over the duration of the exhibition, just as the memory of a celebratory moment might fade over time. Titled Flowers for Africa, Kiwanga’s series is a conceptual project that questions the material from which history is pictured and remembered. These artworks exist in the form of a protocol; they are recreated for each exhibition according to a set of detailed instructions, with differing results based on the interpretation by the florist.

This exhibition at the Or Gallery is the first exhibition of Kiwanga’s work in Vancouver, and the first solo exhibition that recreates all of the existing works in her Flowers for Africa series, for which there are nine to date. The series is ongoing as Kiwanga continues to source images of all 54 states across the continent. The exhibition is organized by artist and writer, Kathleen Ritter, and accompanied by a conversation between Ritter and Kiwanga on the use of archival research in contemporary cultural production. A publication will be produced after the exhibition.

Working with sound, film, performance, installation, and objects, Kapwani Kiwanga relies on extensive research to transform raw information into investigations of historical narratives and their impact on political, social, and community formation. Her work focuses on untold histories and structures of power, examining how certain events in popular and folk narratives take shape in objects and oral histories. Trained as an anthropologist, Kiwanga performs this role in her artistic practice, using historical information to construct narratives that complexify our understanding of human experiences. Kiwanga is not only invested in the past but also the future, telling Afrofuturist stories and creating speculative dossiers from future civilizations to reflect on the impact of historical events.

Kiwanga was born in 1978 in Hamilton, Canada and lives in Paris, France. She graduated from McGill University, Canada with a degree in Anthropology and Comparative Religions. She has been artist-in-residence at L’Ecole National Supérieure des Beaux-arts, Paris; Le Fresnoy: National Contemporary Art Studio (France); MU Foundation, Eindhoven (Netherlands); and Le Manège, Dakar, Senegal. She has exhibited her works internationally, and her film and video works have been nominated for two BAFTAs and have received awards at international film festivals.

Image: Kapwani Kiwanga, Flowers for Africa : Tunisia, 2014
Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Jérôme Poggi, Paris
© Photo : Aurélien Mole
Collection FRAC Ile-de-France, Paris (FR)

Kapwani Kiwanga, Flowers for Africa : Tunisia, 2014 Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Jérôme Poggi, Paris © Photo : Aurélien Mole Collection FRAC Ile-de-France, Paris (FR)

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

An Absolute Movement
Sonny Assu, Matt Browning, Fiona Bowie, Kelly Jazvac, Genevieve Robertson & Jay White
June 17 — July 22, 2017
Reception June 16, 8PM
Curated by Weiyi Chang

An Absolute Movement brings together a body of work by Sonny Assu, Fiona Bowie, Matt Browning, Kelly Jazvac, Genevieve Robertson & Jay White that address the ongoing devastation of climate change and environmental crisis.

As the consequences of climate change continue to threaten our ways of living and being, the question of time has become a crucial dimension underwriting our modes of understanding and grappling with the realities of ecological crisis. The works gathered bridge entangled temporalities, visualizing and materializing the precarious situation of the present and the uncertain futures that have yet to unfold.

Sonny Assu’s series of photographs, Longing (2011), navigate the entwined processes of capitalism and colonialism through a reflection on the material detritus of the logging industry in British Columbia; Fiona Bowie’s Surface (2010-2013) documents the underwater realm of False Creek in the wake of the area’s decimation by industrialization and urbanization; Matt Browning’s Untitled (2017) are woven silk spirals that index the artist’s labour with the labour of silkworms, whose bodies are sacrificed in the pursuit of the luxury material; Kelly Jazvac’s Plastiglomerates (2013) are post-consumer readymades comprised of sand, stone, shell, and coral mixed with plastic detritus that has washed ashore on Kamilo Beach, Hawaii; Genevieve Robertson & Jay White’s pinhole camera images, Watchers (2015), document the proposed route of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline in an act of counter-surveillance to critically engage with the shifting landscapes of extraction.

Sonny Assu is an artist and member of the Liǥwildaʼxw of the Kwakwaka’wakw Nations, currently based in Campbell River. He has exhibited solo at Campbell River Art Gallery, Thunder Bay Art Gallery, and Oakville Galleries. Fiona Bowie is a Costa Rica-based artist from Vancouver. She has produced a number of public art projects, and her work has been exhibited at Western Gallery (Bellingham, WA), Charles H. Scott Gallery (Vancouver), and Yukon Arts Centre (Whitehorse). Matt Browning is an artist from Seattle, Washington. His work has been exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York), Vancouver Art Gallery, and the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery (Vancouver). Kelly Jazvac is a London, Ontario-based artist. Her work has recently been exhibited at the Contemporary Art Gallery (Vancouver), Parisian Laundry (Montreal), and The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum (Collegeville, PA). Genevieve Robertson is a Vancouver-based artist. Her work has been exhibited at Touchstones Museum (Nelson), The New Gallery (Calgary), and Gallery 555 (Toronto). Jay White is an artist and filmmaker based on Bowen Island, BC. His work and films have been exhibited internationally at venues including the Istanbul Design Biennale, National Arts Centre (Ottawa), and Modern Fuel (Kingston).

This exhibition is curated by Weiyi Chang, a graduate student in Critical and Curatorial Studies at the University of British Columbia.

The exhibition is made possible with support from the Killy Foundation and the Audain Endowment for Curatorial Studies through the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory in collaboration with the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at the University of British Columbia.

Image: Kelly Jazvac, Plastiglomerates, (2013)
These found object artworks result from a scientific collaboration between Jazvac, geologist Patricia Corcoran, and oceanographer Charles Moore.
Photo Credit: Jeff Elstone

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



fundraiser


NIGHT FEVER: Or Gallery Dance-a-thon

Saturday, May 13, 9PM – 1AM
Polish Friendship "Zgoda" Society
4015 Fraser Street
Vancouver, BC

DJs Including Daniel R and DJ HEAVY FLOW

Register or donate here!

Help us raise money for contemporary art by dancing (and raising a requisite number of pledge donations)!

Night Fever is the 6th Or Gallery Dance-a-thon fundraiser and will be our best yet.
100% of the proceeds will go towards the Or Gallery’s artistic programming! We rely on the generosity of our donors, members and broader community to provide a space for artistic research, proposition-making and conceptual experimentation.

Dancers who raise $100 or more are eligible to win a selection of amazing prizes! Ask your friends, family, colleagues, and maybe even strangers.
All donations over $30 are eligible for a 2017 tax receipt.

Fabulous gift certificates and prizes from Eugene Choo, The Block, Pulp Fiction Books, Paper Hound Bookshop, Elysian Coffee, Harbour Dance, Black Field Metal Jewelry, Ray-Ray Club Editions, Sans Soucie Textiles, Space Salon, Museum of Anthropology, and many more!

Unique experiential artist prizes from Raymond Boisjoly, Cathy Busby and Garry Neill Kennedy, Tomoyo Ihaya, Heidi Meixner, Bridget Moser, Helen Reed and Hannah Jickling, Kevin Schmidt and more!

http://nightfever.orgallery.org/

Thank you for your support!!! See you on the dance floor!

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton Street.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

It Is Almost That
Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Eleanor King, Nadia Myre, Erdem Taşdelen
May 6 — June 10, 2017
Reception Friday, May 5, 8PM
Curated by Ines Min

Critical works by international artists Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Nadia Myre, Erdem Taşdelen and Eleanor King will be shown for the first time in Vancouver in It Is Almost That, opening May 6. Curated by Ines Min, the exhibition brings together artists from the east and west coasts of North America to investigate the political potential of translation.

The show will feature four bodies of work by the four artists. Cha’s Re Dis Appearing (1977) is a short video that juxtaposes poetic images of a bowl of tea, a beach and water with stream-of-consciousness translations of English and French phrases. King’s Wormholes (2016) are vibrant drawings created by tracing the outline of a CD repeatedly in a spectrum of coloured pencils. Myre’s Orison (2014) are a series of large-scale black-and-white digital prints that expose the reverse side of an older work titled Indian Act (2002). Taşdelen’s The Elements of Discontent (2015) are striking compositions of graphic images sourced from psychology textbooks.

Each artist demonstrates a subversive use of translation, incorporating an act of performance in the production of the work. The exhibition seeks to visualize these hidden processes, engaging in translation as a practice that shifts, destabilizes and negotiates agency. A moment of radical possibility is discovered in the works, which is re-deployed anew with every audience encounter.

Theresa Hak Kyung Cha was born in Busan, South Korea. Her work has been shown at the Berkeley Art Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Institute of Contemporary Art. Eleanor King is a Nova Scotian artist based in New York City. She has held solo exhibitions at A.I.R. Gallery (New York), the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia and Diaz Contemporary (Toronto). Nadia Myre is a visual artist from Quebec and an Algonquin member of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation. She recently exhibited in solo shows at OBORO and the National Museum of American Indian (New York), and participated in the 2014 Shanghai Biennale. Erdem Taşdelen lives and works in Toronto. He held a solo show at the Contemporary Art Gallery this year, and has exhibited in group shows at the MAK (Vienna), the Sabanci Museum (Istanbul) and the Museum für Neue Kunst (Freiburg).

Ines Min is an American writer and editor, and currently a master’s candidate in UBC’s Critical and Curatorial Studies program. She received a Bachelor of Journalism from the University of Texas at Austin, and was the international public relations manager for the 2014 Gwangju Biennale. She has written for artnet News, Art + Auction, Modern Painters, Canvas and Ocula magazine. “It Is Almost That” is her curatorial debut.

The exhibition was organized with support from the Killy Foundation and the Audain Endowment for Curatorial Studies through the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory in collaboration with the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at The University of British Columbia.

Image: Erdem Taşdelen, The Elements of Discontent: Mental Imagery in the Child (2015)

Erdem Tasdelen The Elements of Discontent (2015) Mental Imagery in the Child Inkjet prints on Hahnemühle photo rag paper 29 x 29 inches

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Screening

The Question of Manet's Olympia
V-Girls
Saturday, April 22, 7 PM, 2017

In conjuncton with the release of the Hotel Theory Reader, Fillip, REDCAT, and the Or Gallery are pleased to present a screening of The Question of Manet’s Olympia: Posed and Skirted (1989–92) a filmed performative lecture by the V-Girls.

The Hotel Theory is the fourth title in Fillip’s ongoing Folio Series presenting writing by critics, artists, and curators that engages specific and recurring questions on international contemporary art. This anthology explores the possibilities of theory as an art form, bringing together ideas initially explored in an exhibition organized in 2015 at REDCAT | CalArts’ Downtown Center for Contemporary Arts. The book assembles a collection of texts by David Antin, Art & Language, Ruth Estévez, Bruce Hainley, Wayne Koestenbaum, Chris Kraus, Snejanka Mihaylova, Sohrab Mohebbi, Cally Spooner, V-Girls, Danna Vajda, and Tirdad Zolghadr.

Edited by Sohrab Mohebbi in collaboration with Ruth Estévez, Hotel Theory Reader is co-published by Fillip and REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney / CalArts Theater), Los Angeles.

V-Girls was a feminist performance group based in New York. Active between 1986 and 1996, its members included Martha Baer, Jessica Chalmers, Erin Cramer, Andrea Fraser, and Marianne Weem. The group created satirical scenes of staged art discourse, organizing performances in the form of academic panels, fictional papers, and humorous critiques of art historical analysis.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



symposium

Underground in the Aether
Hannah B. Higgins, Vincent Bonin, Allison Collins, Luis Jacob, Jee-Hae Kim, Felicity Tayler
VIVO Media Arts Centre, 2625 Kaslo Street — Saturday, April 8, 10AM – 5PM, 2017

Or Gallery, in partnership with Burnaby Art Gallery, VIVO Media Arts Centre and Doryphore Independent Curators Society, is pleased to present Underground in the Aether, a symposium responding to the themes of collectivity, selfhood, and communication circuits in the exhibition Hank Bull: Connexion. It will take place Saturday, April 8 (10am – 5pm) at VIVO Media Art Centre, as the closing event for Spring Fever: Vancouver Independent Archives 2017.

Assembling speakers from across Canada, the United States and Europe, Underground in the Aether launches itself into the entanglements of technology, fantasy and sociality as engaged by an informal and international community of artists from the 1960s to present day.

Seizing upon the terminology behind our present network economy, keynote speaker Hannah B. Higgins, Professor of Art History, University of Illinois (Chicago) presents “Aether/Or: The Place of Things and Beings in the Eternal Network,” proposing a rehabilitation of these terms following their use by artists in the 1960s. Presentations by Vincent Bonin (Montreal), Allison Collins (Vancouver), Luis Jacob (Toronto), Jee-Hae Kim (University of Cologne) and Felicity Tayler (University of Toronto), will respectively investigate the stakes and sources behind artists’ turn to the imaginary during times of crisis, how forms, identities and communities are transmuted as they circulate through networks, and how artists’ subcultures convened within mainstream and national communications circuits.

With the underground transposed into the aether all is up in the air: upturned and diffuse, yet also also aloft, unfixed and in movement. Together these presentations look to artists’ practices as a means to consider possible ways of living in and through mediation today.

Free and open to the public. Wheelchair accessible. Lunch and refreshments served.

Project website for programme and biographies: www.doryphore.ca/aether
Updates can be found on the event’s Facebook Page (or info@doryphore.ca)

Organized by Joni Low and Robin Simpson (Doryphore Independent Curators Society) with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, Burnaby Art Gallery, VIVO Media Arts Centre and Or Gallery.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission