Launch

Momus: A Return to Art Criticism Vol. 1, 2014-2017
Sky Goodden
Friday, April 20, 7:00 pm, 2018

Please join us in the Or Bookstore for the launch of Momus: A Return to Art Criticism Vol. 1, 2014-2017 on Friday, April 20. Publisher and Editor Sky Goodden will be in attendance, and joined in conversation with Momus Senior Editor Casey Beal and Denise Ryner.

Since 2014, Momus has dedicated itself to the vital, uphill work of art criticism in a mostly uncritical time. Its contributors wield this responsibility and challenge with an embodied understanding of writing clearly and bravely about our contemporary moment when we cannot afford to waste space. In its first print volume, Momus publishes a compendium of its best – and best-read – writing to date, featuring Andrew Berardini, Aruna D’Souza, Mitch Speed, Saelan Twerdy, Lauren Wetmore, Sky Goodden, Tausif Noor, and more. As NY-based critic Ben Davis writes, “Where other magazines are retreating, Momus is advancing, taking a gamble on sober critical thought and making room for new voices. For anyone interested in potential futures for art writing, Momus is both required homework and a glimmer of hope.”

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

VISR // Closing Panel
Choreography, Politics, and the Movement of Bodies – Alana Gerecke, Sasha Kleinplatz, and Laura June
April 2, 7:00 PM, 2018

Moderated by Justine A. Chambers

In this panel that closes off the VISR semester, ideas and issues around creative movement practices and their relationship to both aesthetics of activism and political protocols that move bodies will be discussed. Differentiations between metaphor, reality, and analogous relationships between these often-siloed practices, and politics as a form of choreography are of interest to the panel.

Spring 2018 Semester: The Body, Movement, Technology, Apparatus

Movement, gesture, protocol, and choreography of specific bodies are continuous in language, politics, technology and other structures that signify and organize material. This semester of the Vancouver Institute of Social Research seeks to discuss ways in which the body and systems co-articulate each other and the inertias of power that attempt to frame them and the disruptions to various sovereignties that emerge. These discussions will take place also as a way to gesture towards the morphing forms of capture that are developing within the everyday hand-to-hand combat with apparatuses.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



workshop

The Writing Table
joined by Sky Goodden
April 24, 6:00 — 8:00 PM, 2018

Please join us in the Or Bookstore for a workshop with Momus Publisher and Editor, Sky Goodden. Beginning with an introduction to Momus, Goodden will discuss the context—both national and international—that led her to launch the publication, which foregrounds brave, accountable and accessible art criticism. Goodden will point to the leading elements and issues in criticism, both historically and in the present. This includes the “crisis of criticism” of the mid-aughts; Canada’s history of urgent, risk-taking criticism in the ’60s-‘80s; and the dearth of evaluative writing in the wake of a theory- and market-driven ’90s. The workshop will incorporate an opportunity to collectively review, edit and discuss an example art critical text, inviting participants to analyse the actively regenerating field of art criticism generally.

This event is free, but space is limited. RSVP by Monday, April 23rd to writingtable@orgallery.org.

- – -

Sky Goodden is the founding publisher and editor of Momus, an international online art publication that stresses a return to art criticism. Momus has been critically recognized, and widely read and shared. It was shortlisted for two International Art Criticism Awards in 2016. Upon its third anniversary in October 2017, Momus has grown an audience of over 700,000 readers. It’s now producing a podcast titled Momus: The Podcast, and has published its first print compendium, Momus: A Return to Art Criticism Vol. 1 (2014-17).

Goodden holds an MFA in Criticism & Curatorial Practice from OCAD University, which in 2016 awarded her with an Alumni of Influence Award, “The Trailblazer.” She has published in Modern Painters, Canadian Art, C Magazine, the National Post, and Art21.

- – -

The Writing Table is a series of arts-writing talks and workshops held in the Or Bookstore and dedicated to investigating the shifting relationship and potentialities between writing and visual art practice. The series brings together experienced arts writers as facilitators in a discussion and writing workshop aimed at cultivating new voices in arts writing, exploring alternative modes of writing about art, and examining writing as a vehicle and as a process for thinking about and producing art. From art criticism, to curatorial writing, to writing as artistic practice, the Writing Table considers the ways in which cogent and critically engaged writing plays a fundamental role in furthering arts discourse and in fostering community. The Writing Table is open to individuals from all backgrounds and experience levels, from recent graduates to writers working in other fields who are interested in the visual arts.

Programmed by Weiyi Chang. Weiyi’s curatorial residency is supported by the Early Career Development Program funded by the BC Arts Council.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

Printed Matter Class Show – One Night Only!

Thursday, March 29, 7:00 – 9:00 PM, 2018

PRINTED MATTER CLASS SHOW – one night only!

Please join us on Thursday, March 29 for an exhibition and sale of works by 22 current students & graduates of UBC’s Printed Matter class. Topics are wide-ranging: the poetry of the everyday; rethinking the past, reflections on relationships, on being geographically dislocated, relocated; grappling with how to express, how to move or woo the viewer; things that matter, things that don’t; emotional expression; some stories obscured, others upfront; some doodles taking shape as indexes of experience; turn the page. Some of this printed matter is more image-based, some more text-centred; there’s an abundance of photography, from family collections, documenting street life or sourced from social media; some editions draw their ideas while others collage together words and images.

In this course we start small, making one-page zines and work up to substantial books. It’s an exciting process. We invite you to come and mingle with the work and the makers and perhaps take something home. Some work will be available for sale.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

VISR // Denise Ferreira Da Silva
Spring 2018 Semester: The Body, Movement, Technology, Apparatus
March 26, 7:00 PM, 2018

We are very excited to welcome Denise Ferreira da Silva as the next speaker in the Spring Semester of the Vancouver Institute of Social Research.

Denise Ferreira da Silva’s academic writings and artistic practice address the ethical questions of the global present and target the metaphysical and ontoepistemological dimensions of modern thought. She is a Professor and Director of The Social Justice Institute (GRSJ) at the University of British Columbia, Adjunct Professor of Fine Arts, at Monash University (Melbourne, Australia), and Visiting Professor of Law, at Birkbeck University of London. She is the author of Toward a Global Idea of Race (2007) and co-editor of Race, Empire, and The Crisis of the Subprime (with Paula Chakravartty,2013. Her art-related work includes texts for publications linked to the 2016 Liverpool and Sao Paulo Biennales, Documenta 14, the award-wining film Serpent Rain (w/ Arjuna Neuman), and events (performances, talks, and private sessions) and texts that part of her practice, Poethical Readings and the Sensing Salon (in collaboration with Valentina Desideri).

Spring 2018 Semester: The Body, Movement, Technology, Apparatus

Movement, gesture, protocol, and choreography of specific bodies are continuous in language, politics, technology and other structures that signify and organize material. This semester of the Vancouver Institute of Social Research seeks to discuss ways in which the body and systems co-articulate each other and the inertias of power that attempt to frame them and the disruptions to various sovereignties that emerge. These discussions will take place also as a way to gesture towards the morphing forms of capture that are developing within the everyday hand-to-hand combat with apparatuses.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

Curator's Talk with Kathy Slade: Gallery Day Vancouver

Saturday, March 24, 2018

Join Canadian Art editors and contributors on Saturday, March 24, for an afternoon of talks, performance and the launch of our Spring 2018 issue, “Dirty Words.”

The day will include a performance by artist Divya Mehra, co-presented with 221A, and a launch party at Franc Gallery for Canadian Art’s Spring 2018 issue.

GALLERY TALKS
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Artspeak, 233 Carrall Street
Writer and Canadian Art contributor Steffanie Ling will moderate a discussion on text-based practices with artists Juli Majer and Casey Wei.

1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Catriona Jeffries, 274 East 1st Avenue
Julia Feyrer, “Background Actors”
Led by Canadian Art‘s editor-in-chief and co-publisher David Balzer

3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Or Gallery, 555 Hamilton Street
Sarah Dobai, “Principals & Deceptions”
Led by exhibition curator Kathy Slade

PERFORMANCE
5:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Divya Mehra, DIFFICULT PEOPLE
221A, Pollyanna 圖書館 Library, 221 Georgia Street East
Co-presented by Canadian Art and 221A

Space is limited, RSVP required: RSVP here

In her work, Divya Mehra speaks to the challenging, and often isolating experience of growing up in the Canadian Prairies. Over the last two years, Mehra has begun compiling a series of non-linear short stories and poetics that trace these experiences with a specific focus on race, violence, death, and the service industry. This performative lecture borrows from traditions of comedy, the monologue, and the artist talk, coupled with documentation from her social media streams and text messages.

For the Spring 2018 issue, Mehra has produced a specially-commissioned cover and an artist project.

SPRING ISSUE LAUNCH
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Franc Gallery, 1654 Franklin Street

Celebrate the launch of the Spring 2018 issue, “Dirty Words” at Franc Gallery, where the exhibition “Borrowed Landscape” featuring work by Glenn Lewis is currently on view.

All are welcome; admission is free.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Artist-Talk

Arjuna Neuman

March 22, 6:00 PM, 2018

Please join the Or Gallery for an artist’s talk by Arjuna Neuman on Thursday, March 22 at 6:00PM.

Arjuna Neuman is an artist, filmmaker and writer. He works with the essay-form across these mediums and through his collaborations. This form can hold a multi-perspectival and mobile approach, where essay comes from the French essayer, “to try”. The essay, then, is an inherently future-oriented and experimental mode, both argumentative and (somewhat) scientific, but also personal, confessional and lyrical. This holding together of different registers is continued in his research, which shifts between the bodily, haptic, and affective through to the planetary, cosmological, and geopolitical. For example, he has been developing the idea of “cloud subjectivity” in response to the resurgence of nationalist and racist claims on the sovereign body and state (i.e. bloodletting): in place of these inherently violent constructions, “cloud subjectivity” recognizes the bacterial universal of all organic and inorganic matter; in particular, that bacteria is both an agent of feeling and an agent of the weather. This provides the ground to speculate on a different organization of life.

At the Or Gallery he will present a selection of past and future works, remixed.

Neuman’s recent presentations include those at Whitechapel Gallery, London; Museum of Image and Sound, Sao Paolo; Istanbul Modern, Turkey; MAAT and Docslisboa, Portugal; Sharjah Biennial 13, UAE; Bergen Assembly, Norway; NTU Centre for Contemporary Art, Singapore; the 56th Venice Biennale and SuperCommunity; Industry of Light, London; the Haus Der Kulturen der Welt; Home Works Forum 7 at Ashkal Alwan and the Beirut Art Centre, Lebanon; Le Gaite Lyric, Paris; the Canadian Centre for Architecture; and the Rat School of Art, Seoul, among others. As a writer he has published essays in Relief Press, Into the Pines Press, The Journal for New Writing, VIA Magazine, Concord, Art Voices, Flaunt, LEAP, Hearings at Contour 8 and e-flux.

Arjuna Neuman’s visit and artist talk are made possible through the UBC Social Justice Institute and St John’s College In Residence Program.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

VISR // Hilda Fernandez
Will a Cyborg Steal My Jouissance? Unconscious Labour and the Enjoying Body of the Virtual
March 19, 7:00 PM, 2018

Jouissance, understood as a sort of pleasurable pain, expressing an excessive tension of psychical nature, coded in the body, consumptive, and inaccessible to the symbolic order, is a universal characteristic of the human subject as bestowed by psychoanalysis. Based on the premise that jouissance and the body share interrelated yet separate spaces, as the latter is always displaced in an imagined other, in this talk I approach the virtual enjoyment dominating our current times to inquire the interrelation between the body, the unconscious labour and jouissance.

I will engage with Alfie Bown’s report on videogames “The Playstation Dreamworld” (2017), Jon Raffman’s recent work “Dream Journal” (2017) and some examples from HBO TV Series “Western World” (2016) and Netflix’s “Black Mirror” (2011-2017) to read the unconscious labour, firstly, as an investment in the virtual space, via our dreams, fantasies and even symptoms (techno-addiction). And secondly, this same unconscious labour it is the subject’s jouissance-ingrained production, and as such, it involves an undecidable and paradoxical loss and a gain (surplus jouissance), which I aim to locate it with regards to the body (individual and social).

With the concept of surplus enjoyment, which Lacan assumes to be parallel to surplus value, I argue that the enjoyment of the subject, via its disembodiment in the virtual space, has resulted in a larger social disembodiment which Tomsic explains as a “self fetishisation” of capitalism. I try to articulate it as a radical shift in subjectivity, where the temporal spatial conditions of embodiment are ever more reliant on mediation and where the lack is unbearable, unless the proliferating world of virtual images mediates it.

At the dawn of artificial intelligence and the consolidation of virtual spaces, what relation can be thought between our bodies, the unconscious labour power and our enjoyment? Will our enjoying bodies, the last frontier of our imaginary property, turn out to be stolen goods by a cyborg in servitude of wealth accumulation of big data corporations who have algorithmically manufactured our desires?

Spring 2018 Semester: The Body, Movement, Technology, Apparatus

Movement, gesture, protocol, and choreography of specific bodies are continuous in language, politics, technology and other structures that signify and organize material. This semester of the Vancouver Institute of Social Research seeks to discuss ways in which the body and systems co-articulate each other and the inertias of power that attempt to frame them and the disruptions to various sovereignties that emerge. These discussions will take place also as a way to gesture towards the morphing forms of capture that are developing within the everyday hand-to-hand combat with apparatuses.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

VISR // Ray Hsu & Eyemole Collective
Desiccated Utopianism [God Mode]
March 12, 7:00 PM, 2018

frenz r gud

God mode, a general purpose term for a cheat code in video games that makes a player invincible
Windows Master Control Panel shortcut, sometimes referred to as Windows God Mode
— Wikipedia

In this hybrid talk/tech demo, we at the Eyemole art collective reflect on our interventions into late capitalism’s “God mode”: specifically, the future of futurities that Achille Mbembe describes as the “negative messianism” of “apocalyptic libertarianism.” We argue that a key articulation of Silicon Valley theology operates via intellectual property–specifically the patent–that lays the conceptual groundwork for monopoly capitalism’s vision of the end time.

Behind its urgent walling off of the intellectual commons lies the fields of Virtual Reality and Neurotechnology. These two technologies promise, alongside techno-utopian dreams of ultimate liberal humanist empathy, ever new heights of panoptic control over every aspect of everyday life via sensation (VR) and volition (Neurotechnology), abetting all the while the complicit handover of data to the state or simply opening such data to hacker attack, state-sponsored and otherwise.

Via guerrilla hacks and golem-like creations, we aim to seize control of a fiery spark from the heights of contemporary techno-capitalism and formulate a new critical dystopian praxis offering redemption beyond the apocalypse.

Spring 2018 Semester: The Body, Movement, Technology, Apparatus

Movement, gesture, protocol, and choreography of specific bodies are continuous in language, politics, technology and other structures that signify and organize material. This semester of the Vancouver Institute of Social Research seeks to discuss ways in which the body and systems co-articulate each other and the inertias of power that attempt to frame them and the disruptions to various sovereignties that emerge. These discussions will take place also as a way to gesture towards the morphing forms of capture that are developing within the everyday hand-to-hand combat with apparatuses.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

VISR // Lee Su-Feh
Wrestling for Autonomy: choreographic gestures
March 5, 7:00PM, 2018

How do I know my body and its pleasures are mine when they have developed under oppressive systems? If our conscious sense of self is a social construct, how do we discern between our autonomous self and our socially-obligated or machine-mediated self?

Lee Su-Feh will discuss how these questions drive her work and practice as a choreographer and teacher; and how they show up in her current work Dance Machine.

Dance Machine will be performed at the Anvil Centre the week following, March 16-18, 2-8pm.

Spring 2018 Semester: The Body, Movement, Technology, Apparatus

Movement, gesture, protocol, and choreography of specific bodies are continuous in language, politics, technology and other structures that signify and organize material. This semester of the Vancouver Institute of Social Research seeks to discuss ways in which the body and systems co-articulate each other and the inertias of power that attempt to frame them and the disruptions to various sovereignties that emerge. These discussions will take place also as a way to gesture towards the morphing forms of capture that are developing within the everyday hand-to-hand combat with apparatuses.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Project

What Are Our Supports? common place
Emily Neufeld, with Cease Wyss
February 27 – March 3 & March 6 – 10, 12:00 – 4:00 PM, 2018
Reception and Artist's Talk Saturday, March 10, 2:00 – 3:30 PM, Cathedral Square Park
Curated by Joni Low

What are our Supports? is a series of artists’ projects in public space exploring the supports that bear, create and sustain contexts for artistic production, communities, and collective space. Situated within Home Made Home: Boothy, a mobile structure by Germaine Koh, and leading up to Koh’s solo exhibition at Richmond Art Gallery in June, projects by Emily Neufeld with Cease Wyss, Stacey Ho, DRIL Art Collective, and Khan Lee and Andrew Lee will launch monthly in Cathedral Square Park.

What are our supports, amidst current conditions of environmental, social and political precarity? Increased privatization of public life and its friction within everyday experience can not be ignored. How do we draw attention to the supports – invisible and relational, material and incidental, temporary and ongoing – that allow for encounters with art? Are there ways to re-inhabit seemingly outdated support structures – ideas, paradigms, technologies – to imagine different futures? Responding to the need for greater discourse around the creation of space for contemporary art, particularly in a city with rampant urban development and regulation, What are our Supports looks to art in public space as a form of research, provocation, and collective learning. It looks to the frameworks artists propose in working together to create change.

We begin at Cathedral Square Park’s foundation in common place, a work by Emily Neufeld in collaboration with Cease Wyss. Soil is the basis of life on land: a living system full of minerals, microbes, mycelium and insects, upon which contemporary globalized society still rests. Yet it is often eradicated from homes, contained within parks, and paved over in urban contexts. Situated on the unceded traditional territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations, these public parks and “Crown Lands” represent the final vestiges of commonly held spaces. Before colonization, these territories were understood by First Peoples as shared space, cared for by the collective.

Imagining this site before the city, and acknowledging these roots and intentions, Neufeld and Wyss have created an Indigenous ecosystem. The native plants included are red huckleberry, salal, licorice fern, oxalis and others that are utilized as medicine and food by First Peoples. Indigenous knowledge systems share a holistic epistemology of the life-in-common all around us, grounded in strong relationships with the land. Indigenous women’s knowledge in particular shapes the principles of respect, reciprocity and obligation that inform family, community, human and non-human interactions. In Cease’s words, The land owns us. The answers to our ailments can be found in the plants around us.

In considering something as foundational and common as the ground beneath our feet, it becomes vital to attend to these visions – beyond private ownership, land, development and capital. This is dirt. These are plants. With enough water, sunlight and space, they will grow.

Emily Neufeld was born in Alberta and now lives and works in North Vancouver. Her practice investigates place and how humans change and are changed by the surrounding environment, and the layers of memory and psychic history that accumulate in our material world. In addition to collaborative projects with other artists, recent solo exhibitions include Before Demolition (2017: Burrard Arts Foundation), and Picture Window (2016: Vancouver Heritage Foundation), a large-scale billboard on the CBC Wall, downtown Vancouver. Neufeld received her BFA from Emily Carr University of Art and Design in 2013.

T’uy’t’tanat Cease Wyss (Skwxwu7mesh/Sto:Lo//Hawaiian/Swiss) is an interdisciplinary artist, ethnobotanist, educator, and food security activist with a 30-year practice engaging with communities to utilize technology and the natural world as a means of sharing stories. Web-based works like Picto-Prophecy (2012, with En’owkin Centre’s Ullus Collective), public art such as Talking Poles (2009, Surrey), and the Stanley Park Environmental Art Project (2009) all take site-specific inspirations and the stories of our past that inform the present, while looking towards the future and our roles in a longer timeline of ancestry. Upcoming projects include the Vancouver Biennale, and the City of Vancouver’s artist-initiated public art commissions, in collaboration with Anne Riley. Wyss draws from her cultures and spirituality to bring stories back to her family and community that were lost through colonization.

This project series is made possible through the generous support of the City of Vancouver’s Public Art Program. We would also like to thank the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm Language and Culture for translation assistance, A & B Tool Rentals, and Lexie Owen for their generous contributions.

The Or Gallery acknowledges its presence on unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh territories.

Image: Emily Neufeld with Cease Wyss, common place (detail), 2018.
Huckleberry, little mountain hemlock, salal, licorice fern, oxalis, nurse log, soil.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

VISR // Phanuel Antwi
Black Body and the Ether of History: Autobiography as a Larger Project than the Self
February 26, 7:00 PM, 2018

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, theory-based free school which began in 2012. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

Spring 2018 Semester: The Body, Movement, Technology, Apparatus

Movement, gesture, protocol, and choreography of specific bodies are continuous in language, politics, technology and other structures that signify and organize material. This semester of the Vancouver Institute of Social Research seeks to discuss ways in which the body and systems co-articulate each other and the inertias of power that attempt to frame them and the disruptions to various sovereignties that emerge. These discussions will take place also as a way to gesture towards the morphing forms of capture that are developing within the everyday hand-to-hand combat with apparatuses.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

Principles & Deceptions
Sarah Dobai
February 24 — March 24, 2018
Reception Friday, February 23, 8:00 PM with a performance at 8:30 PM
Curated by Kathy Slade

The Or Gallery is pleased to present Principles & Deceptions, a solo exhibition by London-based artist Sarah Dobai.

Dobai’s practice is based in photography, film, publication and performance. Her work reflects on the central position of photography and cinema in relation to ongoing debates around realism, illusionism and authorship. Principles & Deceptions addresses the artist’s focus on copying, repetition, and theft through the presentation of her film Hidden in Plain Sight (2015) alongside a series of photographic excerpts from her bookwork The Overcoat (2015).

Hidden in Plain Sight, originally commissioned by L’Été Photographique de Lectoure in Toulouse, re-presents short excerpts from Robert Bresson’s film Pickpocket (1959). For The Overcoat, a bookwork published by Four Corners Press in London, Dobai contributes a series of photographs of commercial display windows and vitrines that are placed in conversation with Nikolai Gogol’s 1842 novella of the same name, in which the protagonist works as a copyist.

There will be a special performance at the opening reception, where the presentation of Dobai’s film work Hidden in Plain Sight will be accompanied by a live reading.

Dobai is currently collaborating with author Tom McCarthy on a new commission for the Whitstable Biennale. Recent exhibitions and screenings of her work have been presented at: L’Été Photographique de Lectoure, France; The Photographers’ Gallery, London; Whitechapel Gallery, London; Spike Island, Bristol; CCA Glasgow; Kamloops Art Gallery; Kuandu Museum of Fine Art, Taipei; FotoMuseum Antwerp; FotoMuseum Winterthur; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Santiago di Compostella, Spain. Dobai completed an MFA at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. She is a Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art (University of the Arts, London).

Kathy Slade is a Vancouver-based artist who works across mediums. She has exhibited internationally and her work can currently be seen in the Morris and Helen Belkin Gallery’s group exhibition GLUT. Slade is the founding editor of ECU Press and Co-director of Publication Studio Vancouver. She is an Adjunct professor at Emily Carr University and Simon Fraser University.

Image: Sarah Dobai, production still from Hidden in Plain Sight.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

VISR // Sanem Güvenç-Salgırlı
Resisting Emergencies or the Time of the Idiots
February 9 — 7:00 PM, 2018

From climate change to mushrooming authoritarianisms, natural disasters to economic and humanitarian crises, contemporary ontology is overwhelmingly problematized as a multiplicity of emergencies, which calls for faster and swifter modes of action, and ostracizes any other engagement as regressive, reactionary, and unrealistic. This talk puts a question mark to the political imperative of conceptualizing social and political issues on the basis of emergencies. For that, it resuscitates Dostoevsky’s idiot. As a figure of uninitiation (a la Deleuze and Guattari), who constantly reminds us to slow down in whatever task we are undertaking (a la Isabelle Stengers), the idiot opens up the possibility of a different political engagement. Rejecting both nihilist and moralist alternatives, it instead offers the aleatory prospects of encounter in transitory spaces, and suggests to suspend time through the unknown of radical empiricism.

Sanem Güvenç-Salgırlı is a Vancouver-based scholar, who currently teaches science studies inspired social-political theory at Emily Carr University of Art and Design. Before moving to Vancouver in 2016, she was an assistant professor of sociology at Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey; and before that a PhD student and an associate of the Fernand Braduel Center at Binghamton University. Lying at the intersection of science studies, political theory, and historical sociology, her most recent work explores the concepts of the swarm and the cloud, and is particularly inspired by, and a product of the social movements of the post-2010 period. She has published articles and essays in academic, semi-academic, and activist journals in English and Turkish.

The Vancouver Institute for Social Research (VISR) is an independent, para-academic, theory-based free school which began in 2012. Our intent is to move beyond the borders of the traditional university and to open up a more accessible platform in the city for the engaged discussion of critical theory.

Spring 2018 Semester: The Body, Movement, Technology, Apparatus

Movement, gesture, protocol, and choreography of specific bodies are continuous in language, politics, technology and other structures that signify and organize material. This semester of the Vancouver Institute of Social Research seeks to discuss ways in which the body and systems co-articulate each other and the inertias of power that attempt to frame them and the disruptions to various sovereignties that emerge. These discussions will take place also as a way to gesture towards the morphing forms of capture that are developing within the everyday hand-to-hand combat with apparatuses.

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Launch

Berlin 2013/1983
Daniel Young and Christian Giroux
February 8, 6 — 8 PM, 2018

The Or Gallery and Or Bookstore are pleased to present a launch for the artists’ book Berlin 2013/1983, by Canadian artists Daniel Young and Christian Giroux. Young and Giroux will be joined in conversation with Scott Watson at the Or Gallery on February 8, 6-8PM.

Berlin 2013/1983 is an attempt to answer two interrelated research questions: what does one year of new building construction in a city look like, and how does this contemporary city compare to that of a generation earlier? Berlin is an intriguing case study, not least because of the changing geo-politics altering the urban fabric of both East and West Berlin. With encyclopedic pretension, the artists attempted to document every building completed in Berlin in 2013 presented alongside buildings erected one generation (approximately 30 years) earlier.

Devised as an imaging machine to destroy other images, Berlin 2013/1983 counteracts the usual Berlin narratives in its analytical approach and presentation of its 784 building “pairs.” The artists began by photographing subjects at the northwest edge of the city and then traced a path that covers the entire urban area by zig zagging east and west following a boustrophedonic (as “the ox plows”) pattern, a process that began in February and ended in May of 2015. Rather than emphasizing a historical (centralized) or a modern (radial) urban development, the project’s radically democratic form gives the periphery of the city the same value as the centre. The iconic buildings of Berlin-Mitte are only found in the middle of the book and are lost among the sheer abundance of images of new suburban structures within this non-hierarchical inventory of architectural form, format, and function.

Inspired in part by the tradition of conceptual photography projects dedicated to architectural knowledge, Berlin 2013/1983 was conceived as a rigorous dérive and is a radical addition to the architectural discourse and published guides to buildings in Berlin. What was devised as a materialist case study in the political economy of construction of our contemporary moment—and of the just recent past—develops into a study of a local vernacular unfolding over time.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Project

Afterlives Extensions: (currency)
Germaine Koh and Aron Louis Cohen, with Russell Gordon
January 25 — 31, 2018

Curated by Joni Low

Cathedral Square Park
January 25 – 27; & January 30 – 31: 12 to 4 pm
Onsite Smelting: Saturday January 27, 2 to 5 pm

Free to the public


As part of the exhibition Afterlives, Aron Louis Cohen and Germaine Koh will perform (currency) at Cathedral Square Park, transforming Koh’s new mobile structure, Home Made Home: Boothy, into a currency exchange.1 The public is invited to bring small, unwanted electronic items – such as computers and peripherals, cell phones, TVs or home appliances – in exchange for (currency) extracted from its parts.

Koh and Cohen will create ad-hoc coins from electronic waste – stamped, registered and available in exchange for more e-waste. They will dismantle objects in the booth, exposing the labour often outsourced to city perimeters and developing countries. On Saturday, January 27, in collaboration with Russell Gordon and his portable foundry, the artists will pour
(currency) onsite.

(currency) considers the range of values represented in technological objects designed for obsolescence. How do currencies and these electronic devices act as support structures for social and material relations? What are the disparities between use-value and exchange-value, and how might they be bridged? By examining the relationship between materials, the symbolism assigned to them, and their circulation – through purchase, recycling, or disposal – the project questions the logic of “value.” Ironically, while wealth becomes consolidated among the few, “waste” has become abundant, even excessive.

Value today is often linked to a material’s scarcity and necessity – associated with its level of manufacture, its functionality in combination with other materials as consumer goods, and social consensus. Manufacturing produces objects essential to our functioning within technologized society. Computers, phones, laptops and tablets include a number of refined metals, such as gold, silver, copper, aluminum, niobium and rare-earth metals. These elements can be re-extracted from e-waste after its social and functional value approaches nil.

The de-linking of currency from a material standard almost fifty years ago, and the continued abstraction of capital, is part of a wider neoliberal deregulation of the economy, welfare state and public life. In an era of precarity, speculative cryptocurrencies, mass inflation, and rising debt, it becomes apparent that material “waste” is also a wealth – of debt, certainly to our earth. How might we invert “value,” and conceive of “waste” and its potentials differently – so as to imagine different possible futures?

1 Home Made Home: Boothy is a small, mobile aluminum structure by Germaine Koh designed to create a public point for exchange, communication, presentation and shelter. Resembling 1950s telephone booths common to urban vernacular (until the removal of public payphones) and popular culture (from Superman to The Matrix), Boothy is a platform to transform social relations. Its etymology and spirit relates to the Scottish/Gaelic bothy: a rustic wilderness hut governed by a code of shared use. It is the 9th iteration of Koh’s Home Made Home series, a creative enterprise for building innovative small dwellings to imagine other possible ways of living.

HMH: Boothy is a younger cousin to Shell (2006), a transit shelter-like enclosure attached to a Vancouver gallery storefront which exposed the vulnerability of space and the power relations that private and public imply. Unmoored from gallery space into public space, Boothy will host a series of monthly public art projects presented in Cathedral Square Park from January to June 2018, curated by Joni Low.

The Or Gallery acknowledges its presence on unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh territories. This project series is made possible through the generous support of the City of Vancouver’s Public Art Program. We are grateful for the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, the Government of British Columbia, the City of Vancouver, the British Columbia Arts Council, our members, donors, and volunteers. The Or Gallery is a member of the Pacific Association of Artist-Run Centres (PAARC).

Image credit: Germaine Koh, Aron Louis Cohen and Russell Gordon, Currency: First smelt, 2017. Aluminum, copper, heat and labour. Photographs: Aron Louis Cohen.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event


Fillip Presents Chris Kraus

Western Front
303 8th Avenue East
Vancouver, British Columbia

Join Fillip and Los Angeles–based writer Chris Kraus on Saturday, January 20, at 6 pm at the Western Front, Vancouver, for a lecture on the life and work of avant-garde writer Kathy Acker. Presented in collaboration with the Western Front’s ongoing Scrivener’s Monthly series and a Fillip Reading Group with Kraus on January 21, this talk will highlight work from Kraus’s new book After Kathy Acker: A Literary Biography, which uses exhaustive archival research and ongoing conversations with mutual colleagues and friends to trace the contradictions and depth of Acker’s life and work.

Entrance is free. Doors will open at 5:30 pm. Copies of After Kathy Acker will be for sale at the event through the Or Gallery Bookstore. Additional support provided by SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement.

Chris Kraus is the author of the bestselling novel I Love Dick, “the most important book written about men and women in the last century” (Guardian), as well as Aliens and Anorexia (Semiotext(e), 2000), Torpor (Semiotext(e), 2006), Summer of Hate (Semiotext(e), 2012), and two books of cultural criticism. She was a 2016 Guggenheim Fellow and teaches writing at the European Graduate School, Switzerland. Kraus is a co-editor, with Hedi El Kholti and Sylvere Lotringer, of Semiotext(e) and lives in Los Angeles.

This talk is presented in conjunction with the recent release of Hotel Theory Reader, the fourth title in Fillip’s ongoing Folio Series presenting writing by critics, artists, and curators that engages specific and recurring questions on international contemporary art. This anthology explores the possibilities of theory as an art form, bringing together ideas initially explored in an exhibition organized in 2015 at REDCAT | CalArts’ Downtown Center for Contemporary Arts. The book assembles a collection of texts by David Antin, Art & Language, Ruth Estévez, Bruce Hainley, Wayne Koestenbaum, Chris Kraus, Snejanka Mihaylova, Sohrab Mohebbi, Cally Spooner, V-Girls, Danna Vajda, and Tirdad Zolghadr.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton Street.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

Vancouver launch of Collection/Correction
Andrew James Patterson and Jacob Korczynski
Tuesday, January 16, 6–8 PM, 2018

Please join us for the Vancouver launch of Collection/Correction, a survey of the writings of the Toronto-based interdisciplinary artist Andrew James Paterson, edited by the independent curator Jacob Korczynski and co-published by Kunstverein Toronto & Mousse Publishing, with design by Laura Pappa & Lotte Lara Schröder.

For the launch, Jacob Korczynski will present a reading from the Collection/Correction and screen four short videos by Paterson – The Walking Philosopher (2001), Eating Regular (2004), 12 × 26 (2008), and Passing (2013) – whose scripts are included in the survey along with a series of new and recent poems and four of Paterson’s fictocriticism texts, originally published in IMPULSE in the 80s.

Korczynski is also in Vancouver for the exhibition going to go out now, featuring the work of Ellie Epp and Juliette Blightman, which he guest curated at Western Front. going to go out now opens Jan 18 at 7:00pm and runs from Jan 19 to Feb 24, 2018. Please click here for more information.

Andrew James Paterson (b. Toronto, 1952) is an interdisciplinary artist working with video, film, music, performance and writing. He has exhibited and performed his works since 1979; and ‘Collection/Correction’ marks the first survey of his practice. All of his work, regardless of discipline, shares concerns with language, bodies, and technologies; as well as a fascination with shifting paradigms between public and private realms. His writing has been published by YYZ Books, IMPULSE Magazine, FUSE Magazine, PUBLIC and FILE, amongst others. His videos have been presented internationally, including DokFest in Kassel, Germany; EXPERIMENTA in Bangalore, India; EXIS in Seoul, South Korea; MIX in New York, USA; and at the Images Festival and Inside Out in Toronto amongst many other venues. His video work is distributed by Vtape. He was a founding member of the influential band The Government and is currently a member of DERWATT. His novelette Not Joy Division will be launched in January 2018.

Jacob Korczynski is an independent curator based in Toronto. He has curated projects for the Stedelijk Museum, Mercer Union, If I Can’t Dance I Don’t Want to Be Part of Your Revolution, Oakville Galleries and the Badischer Kunstverein, and his writing has been published by art-agenda, Flash Art, Girls Like Us, Little Joe and Code South Way. A tear forms along the seam, his Classroom programme for Art & Education is now online.

Production of Collection/Correction was made possible by the generous support of the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council.

Image courtesy Printed Matter.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



News

Announcing Weiyi Chang as our 2018 Curatorial Resident

January, 2018

We’re happy to introduce our 2018 Curatorial Resident, Weiyi Chang.

Weiyi Chang is a curator and writer based in Vancouver. She has worked in both commercial and non-profit art spaces, including SFU Galleries, Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Griffin Art Projects, and most recently documenta 14. Her writing has appeared in Luma Quarterly, Canadian Art, and C Magazine. She completed her BA in Art History and Philosophy at Western University and her MA in Critical Curatorial Studies at the University of British Columbia.

Weiyi presented her graduating exhibition, An Absolute Movement, featuring the work of Sonny Assu, Matt Browning, Fiona Bowie, Kelly Jazvac, Genevieve Robertson, and Jay White, here with us last year. By “visualizing and materializing the precarious situation of the present and the uncertain futures that have yet to unfold,” An Absolute Movement smartly addressed “the realities of ecological crisis.”

We’re thrilled to be working with Weiyi again in this new capacity. Welcome!

Photo Credit: Jeff Elstone.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



bookstore

New Year's Sale

January 10 — February 3, 2018

The Or Bookstore is having its annual sale, on until February 3. Buy one book and get 5% off, two books for 10% off and three or more for 15%!

Includes all new arrivals from Broken Dimanche Press, Archive Books, K. Verlag, and more.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission