call-for-participants

Nautilus: Flotilla & Or Bookstore
Deadline for Submissions: July 1
Event September 21 — 24, 2017

Nautilus, an Or Bookstore kiosk in partnership with Flotilla 2017, is currently seeking submissions of artists’ books, periodicals, criticism, ephemera and other printed matter for sale and display in the shop in Charlottetown from September 21-24. Artists and small presses are encouraged to apply.

The Or Bookstore is a project of the Or Gallery in Vancouver, BC. The shop specializes in artists’ publishing and carries a range of books and printed matter including editions, artists’ books, monographs, design publications, local publishing, criticism and theory and journals and magazines. Our titles come from Fillip, New Documents, Publication Studio, Sternberg Press, Tsunami Editions, Urbanomic, Motto Distribution and more.

Nautilus will privilege works that highlight the book as an artform.

Books will be sold on consignment, with 60% of the shelf price paid to the artist/publisher and 40% to Or Bookstore following the event. Or Bookstore/Or Gallery is not responsible for any normal shelf wear that may occur over the course of the project.

If you are interested in submitting material to be sold in the shop, please fill out this application form no later than July 1, 2017.

Your submission will be reviewed and you will receive a response via email by July 31.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



fundraiser


NIGHT FEVER: Or Gallery Dance-a-thon

Saturday, May 13, 9PM – 1AM
Polish Friendship "Zgoda" Society
4015 Fraser Street
Vancouver, BC

DJs Including Daniel R and DJ HEAVY FLOW

Register or donate here!

Help us raise money for contemporary art by dancing (and raising a requisite number of pledge donations)!

Night Fever is the 6th Or Gallery Dance-a-thon fundraiser and will be our best yet.
100% of the proceeds will go towards the Or Gallery’s artistic programming! We rely on the generosity of our donors, members and broader community to provide a space for artistic research, proposition-making and conceptual experimentation.

Dancers who raise $100 or more are eligible to win a selection of amazing prizes! Ask your friends, family, colleagues, and maybe even strangers.
All donations over $30 are eligible for a 2017 tax receipt.

Fabulous gift certificates and prizes from Eugene Choo, The Block, Pulp Fiction Books, Paper Hound Bookshop, Elysian Coffee, Harbour Dance, Black Field Metal Jewelry, Ray-Ray Club Editions, Sans Soucie Textiles, Space Salon, Museum of Anthropology, and many more!

Unique experiential artist prizes from Raymond Boisjoly, Cathy Busby and Garry Neill Kennedy, Tomoyo Ihaya, Heidi Meixner, Bridget Moser, Helen Reed and Hannah Jickling, Kevin Schmidt and more!

http://nightfever.orgallery.org/

Thank you for your support!!! See you on the dance floor!

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton Street.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

It Is Almost That
Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Eleanor King, Nadia Myre, Erdem Taşdelen
May 6 — June 10, 2017
Reception Friday, May 5, 8PM
Curated by Ines Min

Critical works by international artists Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Nadia Myre, Erdem Taşdelen and Eleanor King will be shown for the first time in Vancouver in It Is Almost That, opening May 6. Curated by Ines Min, the exhibition brings together artists from the east and west coasts of North America to investigate the political potential of translation.

The show will feature four bodies of work by the four artists. Cha’s Re Dis Appearing (1977) is a short video that juxtaposes poetic images of a bowl of tea, a beach and water with stream-of-consciousness translations of English and French phrases. King’s Wormholes (2016) are vibrant drawings created by tracing the outline of a CD repeatedly in a spectrum of coloured pencils. Myre’s Orison (2014) are a series of large-scale black-and-white digital prints that expose the reverse side of an older work titled Indian Act (2002). Taşdelen’s The Elements of Discontent (2015) are striking compositions of graphic images sourced from psychology textbooks.

Each artist demonstrates a subversive use of translation, incorporating an act of performance in the production of the work. The exhibition seeks to visualize these hidden processes, engaging in translation as a practice that shifts, destabilizes and negotiates agency. A moment of radical possibility is discovered in the works, which is re-deployed anew with every audience encounter.

Theresa Hak Kyung Cha was born in Busan, South Korea. Her work has been shown at the Berkeley Art Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Institute of Contemporary Art. Eleanor King is a Nova Scotian artist based in New York City. She has held solo exhibitions at A.I.R. Gallery (New York), the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia and Diaz Contemporary (Toronto). Nadia Myre is a visual artist from Quebec and an Algonquin member of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation. She recently exhibited in solo shows at OBORO and the National Museum of American Indian (New York), and participated in the 2014 Shanghai Biennale. Erdem Taşdelen lives and works in Toronto. He held a solo show at the Contemporary Art Gallery this year, and has exhibited in group shows at the MAK (Vienna), the Sabanci Museum (Istanbul) and the Museum für Neue Kunst (Freiburg).

Ines Min is an American writer and editor, and currently a master’s candidate in UBC’s Critical and Curatorial Studies program. She received a Bachelor of Journalism from the University of Texas at Austin, and was the international public relations manager for the 2014 Gwangju Biennale. She has written for artnet News, Art + Auction, Modern Painters, Canvas and Ocula magazine. “It Is Almost That” is her curatorial debut.

The exhibition was organized with support from the Killy Foundation and the Audain Endowment for Curatorial Studies through the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory in collaboration with the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at The University of British Columbia.

Image: Erdem Taşdelen, The Elements of Discontent: Mental Imagery in the Child (2015)

Erdem Tasdelen The Elements of Discontent (2015) Mental Imagery in the Child Inkjet prints on Hahnemühle photo rag paper 29 x 29 inches

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Screening

The Question of Manet's Olympia
V-Girls
Saturday, April 22, 7 PM, 2017

In conjuncton with the release of the Hotel Theory Reader, Fillip, REDCAT, and the Or Gallery are pleased to present a screening of The Question of Manet’s Olympia: Posed and Skirted (1989–92) a filmed performative lecture by the V-Girls.

The Hotel Theory is the fourth title in Fillip’s ongoing Folio Series presenting writing by critics, artists, and curators that engages specific and recurring questions on international contemporary art. This anthology explores the possibilities of theory as an art form, bringing together ideas initially explored in an exhibition organized in 2015 at REDCAT | CalArts’ Downtown Center for Contemporary Arts. The book assembles a collection of texts by David Antin, Art & Language, Ruth Estévez, Bruce Hainley, Wayne Koestenbaum, Chris Kraus, Snejanka Mihaylova, Sohrab Mohebbi, Cally Spooner, V-Girls, Danna Vajda, and Tirdad Zolghadr.

Edited by Sohrab Mohebbi in collaboration with Ruth Estévez, Hotel Theory Reader is co-published by Fillip and REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney / CalArts Theater), Los Angeles.

V-Girls was a feminist performance group based in New York. Active between 1986 and 1996, its members included Martha Baer, Jessica Chalmers, Erin Cramer, Andrea Fraser, and Marianne Weem. The group created satirical scenes of staged art discourse, organizing performances in the form of academic panels, fictional papers, and humorous critiques of art historical analysis.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



symposium

Underground in the Aether
Hannah B. Higgins, Vincent Bonin, Allison Collins, Luis Jacob, Jee-Hae Kim, Felicity Tayler
VIVO Media Arts Centre, 2625 Kaslo Street — Saturday, April 8, 10AM – 5PM, 2017

Or Gallery, in partnership with Burnaby Art Gallery, VIVO Media Arts Centre and Doryphore Independent Curators Society, is pleased to present Underground in the Aether, a symposium responding to the themes of collectivity, selfhood, and communication circuits in the exhibition Hank Bull: Connexion. It will take place Saturday, April 8 (10am – 5pm) at VIVO Media Art Centre, as the closing event for Spring Fever: Vancouver Independent Archives 2017.

Assembling speakers from across Canada, the United States and Europe, Underground in the Aether launches itself into the entanglements of technology, fantasy and sociality as engaged by an informal and international community of artists from the 1960s to present day.

Seizing upon the terminology behind our present network economy, keynote speaker Hannah B. Higgins, Professor of Art History, University of Illinois (Chicago) presents “Aether/Or: The Place of Things and Beings in the Eternal Network,” proposing a rehabilitation of these terms following their use by artists in the 1960s. Presentations by Vincent Bonin (Montreal), Allison Collins (Vancouver), Luis Jacob (Toronto), Jee-Hae Kim (University of Cologne) and Felicity Tayler (University of Toronto), will respectively investigate the stakes and sources behind artists’ turn to the imaginary during times of crisis, how forms, identities and communities are transmuted as they circulate through networks, and how artists’ subcultures convened within mainstream and national communications circuits.

With the underground transposed into the aether all is up in the air: upturned and diffuse, yet also also aloft, unfixed and in movement. Together these presentations look to artists’ practices as a means to consider possible ways of living in and through mediation today.

Free and open to the public. Wheelchair accessible. Lunch and refreshments served.

Project website for programme and biographies: www.doryphore.ca/aether
Updates can be found on the event’s Facebook Page (or info@doryphore.ca)

Organized by Joni Low and Robin Simpson (Doryphore Independent Curators Society) with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, Burnaby Art Gallery, VIVO Media Arts Centre and Or Gallery.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



curators-talk

Visiting curators in conjunction with Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures
Krist Gruijthuijsen, Alex Klein, Mark Nash
Wednesday, March 22, 5:30 PM, 2017

The Or Gallery is pleased to partner with the Vancouver Art Gallery to present talks by three international curators who are visiting Vancouver on the occasion of the exhibition Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures. Please join us Wednesday, March 22 at 5:30pm for short presentations followed by questions and a small reception for the curators.

We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia.

Krist Gruijthuijsen is curator, and director of KW Institute for Contemporary Art (Berlin) since July 2016. He has been artistic director of the Grazer Kunstverein in Graz from 2012 until 2016 and is course director of the MA fine arts department at the Sandberg Instituut in Amsterdam since 2011. He is one of the co-founding directors of Kunstverein in Amsterdam and has organized a numerous amount of exhibitions and projects over the past decade, including Manifesta 7 (Trentino-South Tyrol,IT), Platform Garanti Contemporary Art Center (Istanbul), Artists Space (New York, US), Museum of Contemporary Art (Belgrade, RS), Swiss Institute (New York, US), Galeria Vermelho (São Paulo, BR), Stedelijk Museum (Amsterdam), Van Abbemuseum (Eindhoven, NL), Arnolfini (Bristol, UK), Project Arts Centre (Dublin, IE), Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (Salt Lake City, US), and Institute of Modern Art (Brisbane, AU).

Gruijthuijsen has produced, edited and published extensively in numerous collaborations with JRP|Ringier Kunstverlag, Sternberg Press, Mousse Publishing Printed Matter, Inc., Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König and Kunstverein Publishing. Recent publications are amongst others MIERLE LADERMAN UKELESSEVEN WORK BALLETS (Sternberg Press, 2015), VINCENT FECTEAU (Sternberg Press, 2015), WRITINGS AND CONVERSATIONS BY DOUG ASHFORD (Mousse Publishing, 2014), LISA OPPENHEIM: WORKS 2003–2013 (Sternberg Press, 2014), THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF FICTIONAL ARTISTS AND THE ADDITION (JRP|Ringier, 2010), NICHOLAS MANGAN: LIMITS TO GROWTH (Sternberg Press, 2016), THE ANTI-MUSEUM – An anthology by Mathieu Copeland and Balthasar Lorvay (Fri Art & Koenig Books, London, 2017), and several others under the umbrella of Kunstverein Publishing.


Alex Klein is the Dorothy and Stephen R. Weber Curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania (ICA). Her most recent projects at ICA include the exhibition Myths of the Marble (spring 2017) co-curated with Milena Hoegsberg and co-organized with the Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Norway and the multifaceted international research initiative I is for Institute. Previous exhibitions at ICA include Barbara Kasten: Stages (2015), the first major survey of the artist’s work; Consider the Belvedere: Tamara Henderson and Julia Feyrer (2015); AVANT-GARDEner: Ian Hamilton Finlay (2014, co-curated with Lynne Farrington); Vishal Jugdeo: An Education in the Logic of Leaves (2014); Excursus I-IV featuring Reference Library, East of Borneo, Ooga Booga, and Primary Information (2011­–2013); and First Among Equals (2012, co-curated with Kate Kraczon). She also recently served as an agent in the Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hillman Photography Initiative where she co-organized with Tina Kukielski the exhibition Antoine Catala: Distant Feel (2015) and co-edited the publication Shannon Ebner: Auto Body Collision (CMOA, 2015). Her writing has been published in numerous collections, including Public Servants: Art and the Crisis of the Common Good (MIT Press, 2016), The Human Snapshot (Sternberg Press/CCS Bard, 2013), How Soon Is Now? (LUMA, 2012), and the critical volume on photography Words Without Pictures (LACMA/Aperture, 2010), which she also edited. Previously she held positions in the Wallis Annenberg Photography Department at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Roski School of Fine Arts at the University of Southern California, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. She is co-founder with Mark Owens of the editorial project and publishing imprint Oslo Editions.



Mark Nash is an independent curator and writer, until recently Head of Department Curating Contemporary Art at the Royal College of Art London. Before the RCA he helped establish the International Centre for Fine Art Research at the University of the Arts, London. In 2015 -16 he was a Visiting Professor at the Nanyang Technological University Singapore Centre for Contemporary Art.

As a curator Nash has collaborated extensively with Okwui Enwezor on The Arena project at the Venice Biennial 2015, including an epic live reading of Karl Marx’s Das Kapital; ‘The Short Century’ exhibition and Documenta11, (both 2002) and also with Ute Meta Bauer on the 3rd Berlin Biennial (2004). He has also collaborated with artist Isaac Julien on numerous film and art projects.
He has written extensively on artist’s work with the moving image – especially in his curated exhibitions ‘Experiments with Truth’ (Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia (2004-5) and ‘One Sixth of the Earth, ecologies of image’ at ZKM, Karlsruhe and MUSAC, Leon (2012-13). This latter continued to explore the artistic legacy of the formerly socialist countries, first explored in ‘Reimagining October’ at Calvert 22 (2009), (curated with Isaac Julien) and continued with this Red Africa publication and the Things Fall Apart exhibition. Together with Joshua Jiang he has curated a major international exhibition Yingxiang/The Shadow Never Lies, M21: 21st Century Minsheng Art Museum Shanghai (2016).

BC Govt logo

Vancouver Special: Ambivalent Pleasures

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

Fundraising Exhibition and Bookstore Sale

December 10 — December 17, 2016

Works from our art sale continue to be on view, including Hadley+Maxwell’s Décor series and select works by Steven Brekelmans and Una Knox. Or Gallery editions by Raymond Boisjoly, Lorna Brown, Aaron Carpenter, Jeff Downer, Hadley+Maxwell, Stan Douglas and Marina Roy are also be available.

Please also browse our Bookstore sale, 10 – 30 % off until December 17th.

Please note the Or Gallery is closed between Dec 18 and January 10th.

Image: Sandman: Turntable Technix (2003) from Hadley+Maxwell’s Décor Project

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



fundraiser


The Cocktail Hour

December 10, 5-8PM

Please join us for a festive gathering and art sale benefit for the Or Gallery, featuring works from Hadley+Maxwell’s Décor series and select works by Steven Brekelmans and Una Knox. Or Gallery editions by Raymond Boisjoly, Lorna Brown, Aaron Carpenter, Jeff Downer, Hadley+Maxwell, Stan Douglas and Marina Roy will also be available.

Plus: the launch of Artist Cocktails Vol. I!

Music by DJ Patrick Campbell

Image: Sandman: Turntable Technix (2003) from Hadley+Maxwell’s Décor Project

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton Street.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



curators-talk

Eva Birkenstock, Simone Neuenschwander, Kristina Scepanski Visiting Curators from Germany

Wednesday, October 12, 7PM

The Or Gallery is pleased to partner again with the Canadian Embassy in Berlin and the Contemporary Art Gallery (Vancouver) to present visiting curators from Germany. Please join us Wednesday, October 12 at 7PM for short presentations followed by questions and a small reception for the curators.



Eva Birkenstock
Birkenstock
Eva Birkenstock is director of the Kunstverein für die Rheinlande and Westfalen in Düsseldorf. After studying Art History and Cultural Anthropology in Cologne, Berlin and Havana, she worked at the Kunstverein in Hamburg and co-directed Halle für Kunst Lüneburg. From 2010-2016 she was curator of the KUB Arena, the KUB Billboards, and the KUB Projects at Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria. In 2014 she was curator of Mini / Goethe Institut Curatorial Residencies Ludlow38 in New York, since 2015 she has been curating the LISTE Performance Project in Basel.


Simone Neuenschwander
Neuenschwander
Simone Neuenschwander has been director of the Kunstverein Nürnberg – Albrecht Dürer Gesellschaft since 2013. She studied art history and German philology at the University of Basel. In 2004 she began
working at Kunsthalle Basel and was curator there from 2007 to 2009. During this time she curated the group exhibitions “Poor Thing” (2007) and “Rooms Look Back” (2008) with alternating “Inserts” (co-curated with Annette Amberg), among others. Since 2010 she has worked as a freelance curator in Basel and Berlin, organizing the event series MOVES (with Andreas Reihse) at the film and concept store Image Movement in Berlin. From 2011 to 2013, she and Christiane Rekade directed the program of the independent exhibition space OSLO10 in Münchenstein/Basel. At the Kunstverein Nürnberg she has curated projects with Kirsten Pieroth, Tamara Henderson, Reto Pulfer, Nevin Aladag, Diango Hernández, Daniel Gustav Cramer, Olga Balema and Elif Saydam.


Kristina Scepanski
 Scepanski
Kristina Scepanski (*1982) is a curator and art historian from Cologne, Germany. After receiving an MA in Art History, German and English Philology at the University of Cologne in 2009, she has worked for the European Kunsthalle in Cologne, a discursive platform without a physical location, and the Kunstverein in Düsseldorf. In 2011/2012, she was Helena Rubinstein Fellow in the Curatorial Program at the Whitney Independent Study Program in New York, where she co-curated a group show at The Kitchen. Since 2013 she is the artistic director of Westfälischer Kunstverein in Münster, where she has curated solo shows with young international artists including Liz Magic Laser, Virginia Overton, Peter Wächtler, Nicolas Party, Camille Henrot, Magali Reus, and Jon Rafman.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Artist-Talk

Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau

2 PM, Saturday, September 10th, 2016

With curator Joni Low

Join us this coming Saturday to hear Chloë Lum and Yannick Desranleau share about the evolution of their practice into live performance, their current phenomenological research, and the influence of entropy, chromophilia, collaboration and fatigue on their process. How can material misbehaviours – breaking down the accumulation of social codes – allow art to be an open laboratory where we might re-perceive our relationship with objects and the wider world? How might we see through touch?

All colours welcome! Colourful snacks served.

About the artists:

Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau have participated in many group exhibitions throughout North America and Europe, including exhibitions at the University of Texas, Austin (2015); the Center for Books and Paper Arts, Columbia College, Chicago (2015); the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2011); the Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna (2010); and the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead, England (2009). Solo exhibitions include Khiele Gallery, St. Cloud State University, Minnesota (2016); the Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Charlottetown (2014); YYZ Artists’ Outlet, Toronto (2013); and Blackwood Gallery, University of Toronto (2012). Recent performances have been presented in Montreal at the Darling Foundry (2015), and as part of the OFFTA festival (2016). The duo is also known on the international music scene as co-founders of the avant-rock group AIDS Wolf, for whom they also produced award-winning concert posters under the name Séripop.

http://lum-desranleau.com/

Image: Edwin Isford

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Barad, Karen. “Posthumanist Performativity: Toward an Understanding of How Matter Comes to Matter”. Signs 28, no. 3 (2003): 801-831.

Bogost, Ian. Alien Phenomenology, or What It’s Like to Be a Thing. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

Brown, Bill. “Thing Theory”. Critical Inquiry 28, no. 1 (Autumn 2001): 1-22.

Noe, Alva. Action in Perception. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2004.

Morris, Robert. “Notes on Dance”. The Tulane Drama Review 10, no. 2 (Winter 1965): 179-186.

Forsythe, William. “Choreographic Objects” in William Forsythe: Suspense. Edited by Markis Weisbeck, 5-7. Kraichtal, Germany: Ursula Blickle Stiftung, 2008.

Pym, Barbara. The Sweet Dove Died. London: Macmillan Publishers Ltd, 1978.

Krauss, Rosalind and Yve-Alan Bois. “A User’s Guide to Entropy”. October 78 (1996): 38-88.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

5 Tableaux (It Bounces Back)
Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau
10 September — 29 October, 2016
Reception & performance Friday September 9, 7PM Performers: Alexa Mardon, Erika Mitsuhashi and Lexi Vajda
Curated by Joni Low

In conjunction with SWARM

Artist Talk Saturday September 10, 2PM


Exaggerate the movements and stretch the body in arabesque. Make the body take the position of the object, where the object makes the body travel across.

- Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau, performance notes


The Or Gallery is pleased to present 5 Tableaux: (It Bounces Back), a performance and installation work by Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau. Originally conceived at the Fonderie Darling, Montréal, 5 Tableaux expands Lum & Desranleau’s voracious experimentations with the lifespan of materials, how these become animated and form narrative threads and relationships, and the inevitable scuffs and decay incurred through the materials’ exposure to external factors. 2015 marked Lum & Desranleau’s foray into live performance, where they combine dancers, sculpture and music within their immersive silkscreened paper installations, amplifying the performativity of the materials themselves. Objects and materials shape-shift, diffracting direct representations and resisting static identities, becoming imbued with the traces of time, labour and activity.

Collaboration and improvisation are central to Lum & Desranleau’s practice – whether together, with other people, or objects. Their focus on entropy and chance – a physical phenomenon which allows matter to actively engage in the collaborative process – has further informed their belief in the spirit of collective authorship. Amidst the broader culture of chromophobia, they boldly opt for colour, diversity and alterity; against the cult of the new and pristine, they respond with recombinant strategies of DIY and re-use. Drawing from the history of tableaux vivants as a form of protest and appropriation, they add motion and sound, proposing non-hierarchical situations where distinctions between artistic mediums, and between humans and nonhumans, begin to dissolve. These gestures exude resilience, offering strategies in dealing with the accumulated burden of signification, and ways of being within a complex and indeterminate world.

About the artists:

Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau have participated in many group exhibitions throughout North America and Europe, including the University of Texas, Austin (2015); the Center for Books and Paper Arts, Columbia College, Chicago (2015); the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2011); the Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna (2010); and the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead, England (2009). Solo exhibitions include Khiele Gallery, St. Cloud State University, Minnesota (2016); the Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Charlottetown (2014); YYZ Artists’ Outlet, Toronto (2013); and Blackwood Gallery, University of Toronto (2012). Recent performances have been presented in Montreal at the Darling Foundry (2015), and as part of the OFFTA festival (2016). The duo is also known on the international music scene as co-founders of the avant-rock group AIDS Wolf, for whom they also produced award-winning concert posters under the name Séripop.

In 2016, Desranleau was awarded the Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art; in 2015, the duo was long-listed for the Sobey Art Award. Their work is included in collections such as the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the University of Maryland Art Gallery, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, and the Bank of Montreal collection. Desranleau holds an MFA in sculpture from Concordia University in Montreal, and Lum is an MFA candidate at York University, Toronto. They currently divide their time between both cities.

Chloe Lum & Yannick Desranleau are represented by Galerie Hugues Charbonneau in Montreal.
http://lum-desranleau.com

This exhibition is part of a curatorial residency made possible through the Canada Council for the Arts’ assistance to Culturally Diverse Curators.

Photographs by Joni Low

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

Chris Gaudet
Beach Talk

Sunday, August 7, 4PM

Locarno Beach
(map of approximate location)

Please join us for the launch of a new round of Or Gallery Beach Talks. This series, originally held in 2012 at various beaches around Vancouver, was curated by Jonathan Middleton and Jonah Gray and featured presentations thematically linked to the beach context. This year’s iteration will take up where the original series left off.

The first talk will take place at Locarno beach at 4PM on August 7th. Chris Gaudet, a PhD candidate in the department of English at UBC, will present research from his dissertation, which takes up the (failed) aesthetic experiments of the seventeenth century and their reemergence in (late) modernity. His talk will focus specifically on the ways that:

The sphere and the bubble present themselves as sites for poetic reflection on form as such, and, in the seventeenth century, become capable of standing in for a range of historical crises and displacements. How to understand them when they are re-formed under the sign of Richard Crashaw’s wildly experimental poetics? The permanence, the perfection, of the form of the sphere, the impermanence of the barely-holding-itself-together, nevertheless held together in the ‘still’ ‘still’ ‘still’ of Crashaw’s soap bubbles, his tears, his drops of blood, which are all, in some way, the deformed, misshapen pearl of the baroque.

More talks TBA! Stay tuned via Facebook and Twitter for exact details on the location. Stick around after the talk for refreshments and grilling on the hibachi.

Also, don’t miss out on our latest publication, a risograph-printed transcription of Steven Maye’s 2012 Beach Talk, Surfaces for Rent: Distraction, Tactility, and the Gallery. It’s now available at the Or Bookstore for $5.

Chris Gaudet Beach Talk at Lacarno Beach, Vancouver

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton Street.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Online-Project

Isabelle Pauwels ,000,
July 11 - September 11, 2016

Curated by Jonah Gray

Or Gallery is pleased to present a special radio play adaption of Isabelle Pauwels’ ,000, completed in 2015. The play follows two entwined characters: the formerly prominent city of New Westminster, and a disillusioned Actress Slash Dominatrix, as they struggle for legitimacy.

The first iteration of this work was presented in 2014 at the Experimental Media and Performing Arts Centre in Troy, New York, as an immersive installation with 27 channels of audio, 9 channels of video, sculptural elements and choreographed lighting. ,000, has also been adapted into a single channel video that was recently screened as part of the DIM Cinema series at the Cinematheque.

Isabelle Pauwels is a New Westminster-based artist who uses a blend of performance and documentary realism in multimedia installations and video to explore the relationship between narrative conventions and everyday life. She won the 2009 Brink Award and was shortlisted for the 2013 Sobey Award.


Credits

Any resemblance to people & places living or dead, real or imaginary, is probably not coincidental, and sometimes deliberately inaccurate. So don’t believe any of it.

Cast:

The Actress Slash Dominatrix:
Valérie Pauwels

The Chorus of Random Dudes:
Doug Barron
Jack Shaefer
Robb Smith
Gabriel Squailia
Avery Stemple
Tim Stowell
Adam Tedesco
Evan Calder Williams

The Critics:
Doug Barron
Gabriel Squailia
Avery Stemple
Tim Stowell

The Former Emergency Planner Turned Webmaster:
Evan Calder Williams

The Girl Next Door, Down the Street, and All Over the Servers:
Emily Armstrong
Jessica Bennett
Michele Cassaro
Valérie Pauwels

The Mayor / Matthew Begbie Hanging Judge:
Robb Smith

The Stewart at Kruger’s Mill:
Adam Tedesco

V.O.:
Isabelle Pauwels

The WAGS:
Emily Armstrong
Jessica Bennett
Michele Cassaro

Music & Sound Effects:
Paul Kajander

Audio Mixing:
Todd Vos

Audio Editing:
Isabelle Pauwels

Script

The script is a blend of approx. 50% original material and 50% unoriginal material

Original material:
Isabelle Pauwels

Unoriginal material includes direct quotes, paraphrases, and deliberate misquotes from the following:

Email correspondence between Mistress Bijou Steal and prospective clients

Post-it notes for Lucky Girl (2014), a one-woman play written and performed by Valérie Pauwels

www.mssteal.com (2013)

@bijou steal

Excerpts from fetish clips used with permission of Mistress Bijou Steal and Miss Jasmine

Editing instructions, Maximus Productions

www.products.kruger.com

www.creativebc.com

The Internet

Advertisement for the GlassHouse Lofts by Aragon Properties, 2013

Robert Filiou

Eddie Russia

Grant Granger. “Heyday swag lights for Columbia costly.” The New Westminster News Leader, unknown date.

G.M. Chuck Stewart, quoted by Grant Granger. “Kruger to cut 187 jobs from its New Westminster operations.” The New Westminster News Leader, March 8 2012.

Craig Ruttle. “Another look at an ‘eyesore.’ “ The New Westminster News Leader, June 12 2013.

This work was produced through residencies at Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center / EMPAC

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

Pure Numerical Formula Describes Wetness and Light
Mark Fell, Jordan Milner, Eileen Quinlan, Anonymous Tantra Paintings
June 25 — July 30, 2016
Reception Friday June 24
Curated by Eli Bornowsky

“If I could convey my research for this exhibition in the most general fashion it would be characterized as an attempt to scrutinize the relationship between sensation and intellect. Sketching this relation as a waveform, a sine wave for example, I would assign intellect to the peaks and sensation to the valleys of the wave, and the oscillation between the two would model the human experience of movement from inner thought to outer impressions and back again. Whether this relation is drawn taut like a hummingbird or sags like a broken guitar string is up for debate. From my experience it is always in flux, from puttering and purring to bending the throttle, and the intonation of mind-body flirtation is what makes it just as exciting to play with others, as it is to play with oneself. Nevertheless, put this way, but only to begin, we would have to admit our collaboration with the Cartesian separation of mind and body. We tend to take for granted the dualistic mind-body invention and its role in divorcing experience and knowledge. For now, let us install a mind-body program precisely to experiment with the code. What, for example, will happen while riding the oscillator if we take a headlong thrust to the left or the right of its axis? Our x, y oscillator will gain a z, a third dimension and once we have taken this liberty to change course, our freedom to play with the diagram is manifold.”

Download the full exhibition text

View the exhibition teaser

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Event

Conversation and Film Screening: Gowanus Broadside
Jean-Philippe Antoine & Colin Browne
7:00 PM, Thursday, 26 May, 2016

Please join us at the Or Gallery for a discussion with Jean-Philippe Antoine and Colin Browne followed by a screening of Mikael Levin’s 2014 film Gowanus Broadside with sound by Antoine.

Gowanus Broadside is a portrait of the Gowanus Canal, a two-mile-long waterway that extends from the Bay of New York to the south of Brooklyn. Once a marsh and then the principle cargo port of the borough, the canal quickly became one of the most polluted bodies of water in the United States. The film follows the marginal spaces bordering the length of the canal, vestiges of a centre of economic activity, and records the spatial and sonorous qualities of the waterway’s cut into the urban space.

Jean-Philippe Antoine is an artist from Paris. He works with painting, installations, sound and lectures/performances, including collaborations with Leif Elggren and Mikael Levin. Sound publications include The Worried Ones (Antoine-Elggren) Live at 64 (2013), Nouvelles musiques anciennes (CD, 2011) and Objet Métal Esprit (EP, 2010), all at Firework Edition Records.

Antoine is Professor of Aesthetics and Contemporary Art Theory at Paris 8 University. His research focuses on images and the social construction of memory, as well as modern definitions of art. His publications include La traversée du XXe siècle. Joseph Beuys, l’image et le souvenir (Presses du Réel-MAMCO, 2011) and Marcel Broodthaers: Moule, muse, méduse (Presses du réel, 2006).

Colin Browne is a Vancouver-based poet, filmmaker, film historian and Professor Emeritus in the Film program in the Simon Fraser University School for the Contemporary Arts.

This event is presented in collaboration with the Charles H. Scott Gallery at Emily Carr University.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

Security Theatre
Karl Burke, Harun Farocki, A​n-­My Lê and the Bureau of Inverse Technology
May 14 — June 18, 2016
Reception Friday, May 13th, 8PM
Curated by Justin Barski

The Or Gallery is pleased to present Security Theatre, an exhibition featuring works by Karl Burke, Harun Farocki, An-My Lê and the Bureau of Inverse Technology.

Security Theatre revolves around methods of simulation and documentation and their hold on respective truth claims about modern war. Specifically, this exhibition looks at how modern warfare is rationalised, remembered and portrayed across image based media such as electronic games, video and photography. The exhibition examines how these systems manifest and evolve into the 21st century, which sees war increasingly fought by proxy and through remote digital means. While claims of possessing the humanist high ground remain tied to the Western Bloc, they are no longer linked to the policy of deterrence seen in the 20th century, but instead are tied to myths of precision and expedience in a preemptive first strike context. Just as there were efforts in the 20th century to socialise people to the omnipresent threats of nuclearism, so too is there an effort to socialise people to the endless need for conflict underwritten by the ubiquitous threat of terrorist states and actors. This requires the creation of dissociative mental states. While the past mass dissociation of the Cold War addressed the need to prevent nuclear war by preparing for it, today’s dissociation follows the need to prevent terrorism by engaging in it. The technology used and the social conditions required were developed incrementally with the aid of experts in various fields, with the aim of gaining either tacit or explicit endorsement of so-called “security policies” which are largely maintained through obfuscation and manipulation. The artists included use media and techniques that provide an intrinsic sense of objective documentation when making reference to armed conflict and related events, which interpret and manage expectations of modern war.

About the Artists

The Bureau of Inverse Technology
The Bureau of Inverse Technology (BIT) began as a collective of anonymous artists working at the intersection of art and technology. Though their work is publicly available, not much is known about the artists themselves. Formed in either 1991 or 1992 (reports vary), BIT is based in at least three locations: Melbourne, San Francisco and Berlin. BIT’s artist-engineers are involved in design, deployment and documentation of products based on commercially available electronic components such as cameras, radios, networks, robots, sensors, etc. Their stated aim is to be an information agency servicing the Information Age. In 2004 information was released about the founding members: engineer/theorist Natalie Jeremijenko and radio journalist Kate Rich, in addition to artist Daniela Tigani. The anonymity of the Bureau was in part a strategy to reflect on the anonymity of technical production – the diffused accountability and ethnographic anonymity in which information technologies and software are generally produced. BIT works with information technology as its primary material, re-engineering technical systems to address the hidden politics of technology. BIT questions the safety of the corporate imagination and its design upon our technological futures and raises questions of privacy in an increasingly technological world. It presents chilling possibilities of a future reminiscent of George Orwell’s novel 1984, in which unsettling, voyeuristic ways of applying readily available technology erode privacy. Its media products include economic indices, consumer-level network and visualisation devices, as well as videos, sound works, and specialised installations.

Karl Burke
Karl Burke (b.1969) is an Irish photographer living and working in Dublin, Ireland. His interest in photography started in 1987 while studying at Trinity College Dublin, from which he graduated in 1990 with a Bachelor’s Degree in Law. After completing his professional qualifications in 1993 he became a full-time musician in an alternative rock band. He travelled to Berlin and lived there between 1994 and 1995, concentrating on painting. Returning to Ireland he then practiced as a lawyer for several years, finally leaving the legal profession in 2002 to set up a studio writing music for film, television and commercials. Burke departed the studio in 2008 to return to photography on a full-time basis. He won the Grand Prix prize at Fotofestiwal Łódź in 2013 for his project The Harvest of Death v2.0. His work has been exhibited in Ireland, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Argentina and the USA and has been published by The Washington Post; Diário Económico; The Sunday Times; The Irish Times; The British Journal of Photography; Lens, the photojournalism blog of The New York Times; and others. His work aims to explore the underlying threads connecting science, the self, and notions of reality, with a particular interest in the impact of technology on human behaviour.

Harun Farocki
The German film director, screenwriter and media artist Harun Farocki was born in 1944 to an Indian father and a German mother, in Nazi controlled Czechoslovakia. Farocki studied Theatre, Sociology and Journalism in West Berlin in the 1960s. Influenced by Jean-Luc Godard and Bertolt Brecht, Farocki gradually developed his unique style of non-narrative filmmaking concerned with understanding, reflecting and confronting modern society. Since 1966 Farocki produced, wrote and directed more than 100 short and feature-length films for television and cinema, mostly documentaries and essay films that analyzed social realities with a precise use of moving images, and always included the political and sociological context involved in the creation of imagery. Since 1996 Farocki had numerous group and solo exhibitions in museums and galleries worldwide, including New York, Vienna and Paris, followed by retrospectives of his films in London and Warsaw. Farocki’s participation in the prestigious documenta in 1997 and 2007 is an indication of the huge impact that his films and video installations have had in the art context and in the film world: six of his films were presented in the “Forum” of the Berlin International Film Festival and two more films won awards at the Locarno International Film Festival in 2003 and 2007. In 2009 the influential French magazine Cahiers du cinéma named Farocki’s and Andrei Ujica’s celebrated masterpiece Videogramme einer Revolution (1992) one of the 10 most subversive films ever made. Farocki’s life included writing about film and teaching media. As a teacher Farocki had a significant cinematic and intellectual influence on the development of the acclaimed “Berlin School” film movement. He co-wrote five celebrated feature films with its most prominent member Christian Petzold, who used to be his student and assistant. Harun Farocki died at the age of 70 in July 2014 in his home near Berlin.

An-My Lê
An-My Lê’s photographs of landscapes transformed by war or other forms of military activity blur the boundaries between fact and fiction and are rich with layers of meaning. Born in Saigon in 1960, she came to the United States in 1975 as a political refugee. Much of Lê’s work is inspired by her own experience of war and dislocation. From black and white images of her native Vietnam taken on various return visits in 1994 to pictures of Vietnam War battle re-enactments in rural America, her photographs straddle the documentary and the conceptual, creating a neutral perspective that brings the essential ambiguity of the medium to the fore. In her series 29 Palms (2003–2004), Lê documents American soldiers training in a desert in Southern California before their deployment to Iraq. She focuses her camera alternately on young recruits and the harsh terrain in which they practice their drills, lending an obvious artificiality to the photographs that invites speculation about the romance and myth of contemporary warfare. Currently, Lê is documenting the U.S. military’s presence at sites around the world where personnel are undertaking training missions, patrolling international waterways, and offering humanitarian aid. An additional series in progress explores the ongoing ties between Vietnamese nationals who have migrated to southern Louisiana over the past twenty-five years and their homeland in the Mekong Delta.
An-My Lê received B.A.S. (1981) and M.S. (1985) degrees from Stanford University and an M.F.A. (1993) from Yale University. Since 1998, she has been affiliated with Bard College, where she is currently a professor in the Department of Photography. Her work has been exhibited at such venues as the Museum of Modern Art, New York; MoMA PS1, New York; The Art Institute of Chicago; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Dia: Beacon; the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago; TATE Modern, London; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among many others. In 2012, Lê was awarded a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship in recognition of her accomplishments as a photographer and her contributions to the evolution of the medium. Recently she has had major survey shows at the Baltimore Museum of Art; MK Gallery, UK; MAS I Museum aan de Stroom, Antwerp; and Hasselblad Center, Sweden.

This exhibition is curated by Justin Barski and is a collaboration between the Critical and Curatorial Studies Program at the University of British Columbia and the Or Gallery. This project is made possible with the support from the Killy Foundation and the Audain Endowment for Curatorial Studies through the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory in collaboration with the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at the University of British Columbia. Special thanks to Justin Barski’s faculty advisors, Jaleh Mansoor, John O’Brian and Scott Watson as well as the Video Data Bank for their support.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Special-Project

Or Gallery at NADA New York

5 — 8 May, 2016
Reception by invitation Thursday, 5 May, 12-4 PM

Booth 3.08
Basketball City
299 South Street
New York, New York 10002

The Or Gallery is pleased to announce its participation in NADA New York 2016. The gallery will exhibit a small selection of editions and single works by Canadian and Vancouver-based artists pertaining to the city’s strong history of conceptual photographic and textual practices. These include Guilty, 1950 (2010), a previously unreleased photographic edition by Stan Douglas from his acclaimed “Midcentury Studio” series; Temporary Structures II (2012) by Steven Brekelmans; and Sentences on Conceptual Art 1st Draft (2008), Bungled Open Cube (2008) by Hadley+Maxwell, Ray Tracings (2013) by Jessica Eaton, Cast A Pall by Rodney Graham, and Never odd or even (2012) by Una Knox.

Stan Douglas produced his “Midcentury Studio” series in 2010, meticulously staging a collection of photographs under the conceptual premise that they were the work of an anonymous Vancouver photographer practicing between 1945 and 1951. Work in the series includes studio shots of fashion and hair models, promotional shots for entertainers, candid street scenes and film noir-like snapshots of possible crime figures caught in the glare of a blinding flash bulb, destined for the newspaper pages. Guilty, 1950 is of this latter category. Reminiscent of the crime photography of Weegee (Arthur Fellig), the work depicts a well-coiffed man walking up a narrow stairwell, covering his face with his open palm against the ambushing photographer. The work stems from the same body of research used to produce Douglas’s critically acclaimed stage play Helen Lawrence.

Steven Brekelmans’ series “Temporary Structures” draws on the artist’s interest in model kits and hobbies combined with an affinity for high modernist sculpture. The works were produced as a series of timed photographs, between which he reconfigured simple household craft supplies into new sculptural arrangements. Each print depicts 16 of these momentary works.

Hadley+Maxwell’s Bungled Open Cube (2008) and Sentences on Conceptual Art 1st Draft (2008) both started with a passage from Miguel de Cervantes’s Don Quixote: “The reason of the unreason with which my reason is afflicted so weakens my reason that with reason I murmur at your beauty.” Envisioning this sentence as part an early draft of Sol LeWitt’s 1969 Sentences on Conceptual Art, Hadley+Maxwell further extrapolate “prototypes” for LeWitt’s sentences and artworks, rendering them as crumpled notes rescued from the dustbin.

Jessica Eaton has been widely acclaimed for her innovative experiments in colour photography. She creates vibrant images using unique analog techniques that manipulate properties of light. The photographs in the Ray Tracings portfolio are derived from the effects of light bending through glass prisms. As in previous works, here she pushes the rhetoric of abstraction to provoke a sensory experience of colour and space. These optically-charged photographs animate the flux between objects, image, and perception. Making explicit the fact that photographs come from drawing with light, this series references modernist art, such as Berenice Abbot’s science photographs of light rays. Presented at NADA New York in partnership with the Canadian Photography Portfolio Society.

Rodney Graham’s two portfolio images that constitute Cast A Pall are the artist’s favourites from his Black Squares (My Top 100) monochromes that were exhibited at the 50th Venice Biennale in 2003. The series is composed of record albums that are overpainted with India ink; the visibility of the underlying image is dictated by the ink’s adherence to the surface finish. This diptych was originally designated as the front and back cover for the artist’s second rock album, to be called Cast A Pall. The project evolved into Rock Is Hard, a double LP of original songs, which was ultimately released with a revised cover. Presented at NADA New York in partnership with the Canadian Photography Portfolio Society.

In imitation of the way in which the human eye registers colour, Una Knox’s series of images of a museum interior, Never odd or even, is produced using the trichrome photographic process, in which each wavelength of light is captured on a separate black and white negative and then combined afterwards to produce a single chromatic print. This process renders visitors to the gallery as brightly coloured shadows, as each remained stationary for only one of the three photographs required to produce the colour image.

The Or Gallery will also present an assortment of drawings and Risograph editions, including works by Lorna Brown, Raymond Boisjoly, Aaron Carpenter and Marina Roy.

About the Or Gallery
The Or Gallery (est. 1983) is a non-profit artist-run centre committed to exhibiting work by local, national, and international artists whose art practice is of a critical, conceptual and/or interdisciplinary nature. Since its inception, the gallery has acted as a space for research, proposition making, conceptual experimentation and documentation. The works presented in this sale were contributed by the artists to assist the Or Gallery in its operations and to establish an international residency apartment and studio in Vancouver. We extend our deep thanks to the contributing artists and their gallery representatives, including David Zwirner Gallery (New York) and Catriona Jeffries Gallery (Vancouver).

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



talk

Joni Low The malleability of identity then and now
Thursday, March 31, 7 PM

Curated by Jonah Gray

Or Gallery is pleased to present a talk by independent curator Joni Low for the final instalment of our Curating the Self lecture series.

Low will share her interests in the metaphor of the archive, the ways in which material accumulations perform identities and selves, and the virtual commons as a space of expressive possibility. Drawing on the idea of the archive as an extension of the self, she will discuss past curatorial projects including Fountain: the source or origin of anything, a public art and web project by Laiwan, and Hank Bull: Connexion, an exhibition of collected material traces of life lived as art, currently touring across Canada. She will also screen examples from 1970s performance and video art – including Kate Craig’s Flying Leopard and Norman Cohn’s How We Lived – reflecting on artistic strategies around the malleability of identity then, the performance of selves in our networked digital now, and the shaping of curatorial frameworks around what artists choose to reveal and conceal.


Following this lecture, Or Gallery will host a reading group focused on an essay selected by Low from Hito Steyerl’s Wretched of the Screen (Sternberg Press, 2012). The reading group will take place at the Or on Wednesday April 6 at 7PM. Space is limited so please RSVP .

Joni Low is an independent curator and writer committed to building conversations around interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspectives. Recent exhibitions include Hank Bull: Connexion (2015-2017, Charlottetown, Montréal, Halifax and Burnaby), Fountain: the source or origin of anything, a public artwork by Laiwan (2014, The Wall: CBC Plaza) and Idle Wild: DRIL art collective (2012, Café for Contemporary Art). She has written for catalogues and publications including Canadian Art, C Magazine, The Capilano Review, Fillip, and Yishu: Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art. A member of Other Sights for Artists’ Projects and the Doryphore Independent Curators’ Society, Low has held positions at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Long March Space Beijing, and Centre A.

Curating the Self is a lecture series that explores the construction of identity in relation to the discipline of curating as well as the many forms of cultural assemblage that have lately begun to appropriate and adapt curatorial strategies for their own purposes.

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



Exhibition

Wood Land School Critical Anthology
Duane Linklater, cheyanne turions, Amy Kazymerchyk, Candice Hopkins, Tanya Lukin Linklater, Liz Park, Postcommodity, Raymond Boisjoly, David Garneau, Walter Scott
March 19 — April 23, 2016

An exhibition of documentation from the Wood Land School Critical Anthology symposium (March 11-13, 2016)

The weekend of talks brought together artists and curators to address the lack of critical writing on the work of contemporary Indigenous artists. The presentation of papers-in-progress by all the participants will work to advance the discourse around Indigenous contemporary art practices and will ultimately cohere into an anthology co-published by Or Gallery and SFU Galleries at the end of 2016.

Wood Land School is an ongoing project with no fixed location and a shifting form. It seeks critical engagement within the realms of representation, film, contemporary art, land, and politics on Turtle Island and beyond. Each iteration of Wood Land School carries forth with it a commitment to address the lack of structural inclusion, both historically and in the now, in a multiplicity of institutional spaces. It is a conceptual and physical space for Indigenous people, with Indigenous people deciding its directions, structures and functions. An important aspect of Wood Land School is the inclusion of non-Indigenous people, so as not to exclude anyone interested in engaging with the complexities of the aforementioned issues. Wood Land School started in 2011 with a small exhibition of works, selected by Duane Linklater, in a studio space located above a store on the Nipissing First Nations in Ontario. Since then it has taken many forms such as residencies, seminars, film screenings and discursive happenings, in places such as The Banff Center for the Arts, Art Metropole, and Simon Fraser University.

Duane Linklater
cheyanne turions – From Where Do You Speak?: Locating the Possibility of Decolonization in Krista Belle Stewart’s Seraphine Seraphine
Raymond Boisjoly, Questions without answers: needs, justifications, explanations, meaning
Amy Kazymerchyk – Bush Gallery
David Garneau – Can I Get a Witness?: Indigenous, Art, Criticism
Postcommodity – Art is Deaf
Walter Scott – Wendy’s Revenge (with Amy Kazymerchyk)
Candice Hopkins – Outside the margins and inside the institution
Tanya Lukin Linklater – A Glossary of Insistence
Liz Park – Exhibitions about Exhibitions, Criticism of Criticism
Closing remarks

Editor:

Duane Linklater is Omaskêko Cree, from Moose Cree First Nation in Northern Ontario, and is currently based in North Bay, Ontario. He was educated at the University of Alberta, receiving a Bachelor of Native Studies and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Duane attended the Milton Avery Graduate School of Arts at Bard College in upstate New York, completing his Master of Fine Arts in Film and Video. Duane produces a range of work including video and film installations, photography, sculptural objects, and often works within the contexts of cooperative and collaborative gestures. He has exhibited and screened his work nationally and internationally at the Vancouver Art Gallery; Family Business Gallery in New York City; Te Tuhi Centre for Arts, Auckland, New Zealand; City Arts Centre in Edinburgh Scotland; and at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, Philadelphia. His collaborative film project with Brian Jungen, Modest Livelihood, was originally presented at the Walter Phillips Gallery at The Banff Centre as a part of dOCUMENTA (13) with subsequent exhibitions of this work at the Logan Centre Gallery at the University of Chicago, Catriona Jeffries Gallery in Vancouver and the Art Gallery of Ontario. Duane was also the recipient of the 2013 Sobey Art Award, an annual prize given to an artist under 40. Duane is currently represented by Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver.

Writers:

Raymond Boisjoly is an artist of Haida and Québécois descent, living and working in Vancouver. Boisjoly’s practice operates as active speculation, engaging issues of aboriginality, language as cultural practice and the experiential aspects of materiality. His process is situated in proximity to photography, and concerns the nature of technology and its transmission as a means to index and understand cultural transformation. Boisjoly has presented work in solo and group exhibitions at institutions including the Senter for Nordlige Folk, Manndalen; Simon Fraser University Gallery, Vancouver; Esker Foundation, Calgary; Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver; the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto; and Western Bridge, Seattle.

David Garneau (Métis) is Associate Professor of Visual Arts at the University of Regina, Saskatchewan. His practice includes painting, drawing, performance art, video, curation, and critical writing. He is interested in visual and tactile expressions of contemporary Indigenous identities and moments of friction between nature and culture, materialism and metaphysics. Garneau recently co-curated (with Michelle LaVallee) Moving Forward, Never Forgetting, an exhibition concerning the legacies of Indian Residential Schools, other forms of aggressive assimilation, and (re)conciliation. He has written numerous catalogue essays and reviews and has recently given talks in Australia, the United States and Canada. He is currently working on curatorial projects in Sydney and New York, and is part of a five-year, SSHRC funded, curatorial research project, “Creative Conciliation.”

Candice Hopkins is a Curatorial Advisor for dOCUMENTA 14. She has held curatorial positions at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, National Gallery of Canada, the Western Front and the Walter Phillips Gallery. Hopkins’ writings on history, art, and vernacular architecture are published by MIT Press, BlackDog Publishing, Revolver, New York University, Fillip, and the National Museum of the American Indian, among others. She has lectured widely including a keynote presentation with Hetti Perkins on the “sovereign imagination” for dOCUMENTA (13). She is co-curator of the exhibitions Close Encounters: The Next 500 Years; Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art; and the 2014 SITE Santa Fe Biennial exhibition Unsettled Landscapes. Hopkins has co-edited the books Recipes for an Encounter (Western Front) and Jimmie Durham: The Second Particle Wave Theory (Walter Phillips Gallery Editions and Art Editions North).

Amy Kazymerchyk is the curator of SFU Galleries’ Audain Gallery. She has programmed for VIVOMedia Arts Centre, the Signal + Noise Media Arts Festival, Vancouver Queer Film Festival and DIMCinema at The Cinematheque. Amy has contributed to Artist-Run Culture in Vancouver in numerous capacities and continues to support both institutional and non-institutional artist run initiatives and projects.

Liz Park is a curator and writer currently based in Pittsburgh as Associate Curator of Carnegie International 2018. She has curated exhibitions at the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, the Kitchen in New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia, and Seoul Art Space_Geumcheon in Seoul. Her writing has been published by Afterimage, Afterall Online, ArtAsiaPacific, Performa Magazine, Fillip, MOMUS, Pluto Press, and Ryerson University Press among others. In 2011–2012 Park was Helena Rubinstein Fellow in the Curatorial Program at the Whitney Museum’s Independent Study Program, and in 2013-2015 she was Whitney-Lauder Curatorial Fellow at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia. The topics of her curatorial research and writing include the politics of visibility, representation of violence, ghosts, and non-western art in the global context of contemporary art.

Tanya Lukin Linklater’s performance collaborations, videos, photographs and installations have been exhibited at EFA Project Space, NYC; Museum of Contemporary Art Santiago, Chilé; SBC Gallery, Montreal; Western Front, Vancouver; Urban Shaman, Winnipeg; Images Festival + Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Toronto; grunt gallery, Vancouver; Nuit Blanche, Winnipeg; Museum of Contemporary Native Art, Santa Fe; Culver Center for the Arts, California; People of Good Will Project, Guelph; and elsewhere. She is compelled by the interstices of visual art and poetry, pedagogy, indigenous languages, portrayals of women and children in film, and the body. In 2016, she will present performances at Remai Modern, Saskatoon; Centre Phi + DHC / Art, Montreal; and the Belkin Gallery/UBC, Vancouver; and install new work at Art Gallery of Alberta in a two-person exhibition with Duane Linklater. Her poetry and essays have been published by C Magazine, Access Gallery, BlackFlash Magazine, Yellow Medicine Review, Taos International Journal of Poetry and Art, Drunken Boat, Ice Floe, Western Front Gallery, and McLaren Art Centre. Tanya studied at University of Alberta (M.Ed.) and Stanford University (A.B. Honours) where she received the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship and the Louis Sudler Prize for Creative and Performing Arts. She is currently a graduate student in Cultural Studies at Queen’s University. She was awarded the Chalmers Professional Development Grant in 2010 and the K.M. Hunter Artist Award in Literature in 2013. She originates from southern Alaska and is based in northern Ontario, Canada.

Postcommodity is an interdisciplinary arts collective comprised of Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martínez, Kade L. Twist and Nathan Young. Postcommodity’s art functions as a shared Indigenous lens and voice to engage the assaultive manifestations of the global market and its supporting institutions, public perceptions, beliefs, and individual actions that comprise the ever-expanding, multinational, multiracial and multiethnic colonizing force that is defining the 21st Century through ever increasing velocities and complex forms of violence. Postcommodity works to forge new metaphors capable of rationalizing our shared experiences within this increasingly challenging contemporary environment; promote a constructive discourse that challenges the social, political and economic processes that are destabilizing communities and geographies; and connect Indigenous narratives of cultural self-determination with the broader public sphere. Postcommodity are the recipients of grants from the Telluride Institute (2007), American Composers Forum (2008), Arizona Commission on the Arts (2009), Elly Kay Fund (2010), Joan Mitchell Foundation (2010), Creative Capital (2012), Art Matters (2013), and the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (2014). In 2011 the collective’s work was featured in Close Encounters, an international Indigenous exhibition exhibited in multiple venues throughout the city of Winnipeg; Contour, the 5th Biennial of the Moving Image in Mechelen, Belgium; Nuit Blanche, Toronto; Half Life: Patterns of Change, Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico; The Night is Filled With the Harmonics of Suburban Dreams, Lawrence Art Center, Lawrence, Kansas; Here, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Museum; 18th Biennale of Sydney in Sydney, Australia; Adelaide International in Adelaide, Australia; and Time Lapse, Site Santa Fe, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In 2013, Postcommodity exhibited their work at the Headlands Center for the Arts, and also opened their art space, Spirit Abuse, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In 2015, Postcommodity exhibited at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art and staged a site-specific 2-mile long land installation at the US/Mexican border near Douglas, Arizona.

Walter Scott is a Kahnawake-born, Montreal/Toronto based artist working in writing, illustration, performance and sculpture. His ongoing comic book series, Wendy, follows a young woman living in an urban centre whose dreams of contemporary art stardom are perpetually derailed. Recent exhibitions include Habitual Present, 8-11, Toronto; Pre-Existing Work, Macaulay and Co. Fine Art, Vancouver; and Stopping the Sun In Its Course at Francois Ghebaly, Los Angeles. In 2014 he was Artist-in-Residence at the Koganecho Bazaar in Yokohama.

cheyanne turions is an independent curator and writer who holds a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy from the University of British Columbia, and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in Visual Studies from the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design at the University of Toronto. From the farmlands of Treaty 8, she is of settler and Indigenous ancestry. Her work approaches the space of exhibition as alive: the gallery is a space of dialogue where artists, curators and publics can reflect on and experiment with ways of seeing and being in relation. Recently she curated Talking Back, Otherwise, a year-long exhibition at the Jackman Humanities Institute. Forthcoming writing projects include contributions to MAWA’s Desire/Change: Contemporary Canadian Feminist Art; Johanna Householder and Tanya Mars’s More Caught in the Act: An Anthology of Performance Art by Canadian Women; and Meryl McMaster’s Confluence. Her exhibition Other Electricities was presented the award for Innovation in a Collections-based Exhibition by the Ontario Association of Art Galleries in 2014. In 2015 she received the inaugural Reesa Greenberg Curatorial Studies Award and the Hnatyshyn Foundation’s Emerging Curator of Contemporary Canadian Art Award. She sits on the Board of Directors for Kunstverein Toronto, the Editorial Advisory Committee for C Magazine and the Advisory Board for the Art Museum at the University of Toronto. She is the director of No Reading After the Internet (Toronto).

SFU Galleries | Simon Fraser University

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Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission



symposium

Wood Land School: Critical Anthology
Duane Linklater, cheyanne turions, Amy Kazymerchyk, Candice Hopkins, Tanya Lukin Linklater, Liz Park, Postcommodity, Raymond Boisjoly, David Garneau, Walter Scott
March 11 — March 13, 2016

A symposium on directions in Indigenous contemporary art

Or Gallery, 555 Hamilton Street, Vancouver
Co-presented by Or Gallery and SFU Galleries

This weekend of talks brings together artists and curators to address the lack of critical writing on the work of contemporary Indigenous artists. The presentation of papers-in-progress by all the participants will work to advance the discourse around Indigenous contemporary art practices and will ultimately cohere into an anthology co-published by Or Gallery and SFU Galleries at the end of 2016.

Wood Land School is an ongoing project with no fixed location and a shifting form. It seeks critical engagement within the realms of representation, film, contemporary art, land, and politics on Turtle Island and beyond. Each iteration of Wood Land School carries forth with it a commitment to address the lack of structural inclusion, both historically and in the now, in a multiplicity of institutional spaces. It is a conceptual and physical space for Indigenous people, with Indigenous people deciding its directions, structures and functions. An important aspect of Wood Land School is the inclusion of non-Indigenous people, so as not to exclude anyone interested in engaging with the complexities of the aforementioned issues. Wood Land School started in 2011 with a small exhibition of works, selected by Duane Linklater, in a studio space located above a store on the Nipissing First Nations in Ontario. Since then it has taken many forms such as residencies, seminars, film screenings and discursive happenings, in places such as The Banff Center for the Arts, Art Metropole, and Simon Fraser University.

Friday, March 11, 2016
6:00-7:30PM Duane Linklater
Saturday, March 12, 2016
10:00AM cheyanne turions – From Where Do You Speak?: Locating the Possibility of Decolonization in Krista Belle Stewart’s Seraphine Seraphine
11:00AM Raymond Boisjoly, Questions without answers: needs, justifications, explanations, meaning
12:00PM Lunch break
1:00PM Amy Kazymerchyk – Bush Gallery
2:00PM David Garneau – Can I Get a Witness?: Indigenous, Art, Criticism
3:00PM Postcommodity – Art is Deaf
Sunday, March 13, 2016
10:00AM Walter Scott – Wendy’s Revenge
11:00AM Candice Hopkins – Outside the margins and inside the institution
12:00PM Lunch break
1:00PM Tanya Lukin Linklater – A Glossary of Insistence
2:00PM Liz Park – Exhibitions about Exhibitions, Criticism of Criticism
3:00PM Closing remarks

Editor:

Duane Linklater is Omaskêko Cree, from Moose Cree First Nation in Northern Ontario, and is currently based in North Bay, Ontario. He was educated at the University of Alberta, receiving a Bachelor of Native Studies and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Duane attended the Milton Avery Graduate School of Arts at Bard College in upstate New York, completing his Master of Fine Arts in Film and Video. Duane produces a range of work including video and film installations, photography, sculptural objects, and often works within the contexts of cooperative and collaborative gestures. He has exhibited and screened his work nationally and internationally at the Vancouver Art Gallery; Family Business Gallery in New York City; Te Tuhi Centre for Arts, Auckland, New Zealand; City Arts Centre in Edinburgh Scotland; and at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, Philadelphia. His collaborative film project with Brian Jungen, Modest Livelihood, was originally presented at the Walter Phillips Gallery at The Banff Centre as a part of dOCUMENTA (13) with subsequent exhibitions of this work at the Logan Centre Gallery at the University of Chicago, Catriona Jeffries Gallery in Vancouver and the Art Gallery of Ontario. Duane was also the recipient of the 2013 Sobey Art Award, an annual prize given to an artist under 40. Duane is currently represented by Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver.

Writers:

Raymond Boisjoly is an artist of Haida and Québécois descent, living and working in Vancouver. Boisjoly’s practice operates as active speculation, engaging issues of aboriginality, language as cultural practice and the experiential aspects of materiality. His process is situated in proximity to photography, and concerns the nature of technology and its transmission as a means to index and understand cultural transformation. Boisjoly has presented work in solo and group exhibitions at institutions including the Senter for Nordlige Folk, Manndalen; Simon Fraser University Gallery, Vancouver; Esker Foundation, Calgary; Catriona Jeffries Gallery, Vancouver; the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto; and Western Bridge, Seattle.

David Garneau (Métis) is Associate Professor of Visual Arts at the University of Regina, Saskatchewan. His practice includes painting, drawing, performance art, video, curation, and critical writing. He is interested in visual and tactile expressions of contemporary Indigenous identities and moments of friction between nature and culture, materialism and metaphysics. Garneau recently co-curated (with Michelle LaVallee) Moving Forward, Never Forgetting, an exhibition concerning the legacies of Indian Residential Schools, other forms of aggressive assimilation, and (re)conciliation. He has written numerous catalogue essays and reviews and has recently given talks in Australia, the United States and Canada. He is currently working on curatorial projects in Sydney and New York, and is part of a five-year, SSHRC funded, curatorial research project, “Creative Conciliation.”

Candice Hopkins is a Curatorial Advisor for dOCUMENTA 14. She has held curatorial positions at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, National Gallery of Canada, the Western Front and the Walter Phillips Gallery. Hopkins’ writings on history, art, and vernacular architecture are published by MIT Press, BlackDog Publishing, Revolver, New York University, Fillip, and the National Museum of the American Indian, among others. She has lectured widely including a keynote presentation with Hetti Perkins on the “sovereign imagination” for dOCUMENTA (13). She is co-curator of the exhibitions Close Encounters: The Next 500 Years; Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art; and the 2014 SITE Santa Fe Biennial exhibition Unsettled Landscapes. Hopkins has co-edited the books Recipes for an Encounter (Western Front) and Jimmie Durham: The Second Particle Wave Theory (Walter Phillips Gallery Editions and Art Editions North).

Amy Kazymerchyk is the curator of SFU Galleries’ Audain Gallery. She has programmed for VIVOMedia Arts Centre, the Signal + Noise Media Arts Festival, Vancouver Queer Film Festival and DIMCinema at The Cinematheque. Amy has contributed to Artist-Run Culture in Vancouver in numerous capacities and continues to support both institutional and non-institutional artist run initiatives and projects.

Liz Park is a curator and writer currently based in Pittsburgh as Associate Curator of Carnegie International 2018. She has curated exhibitions at the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, the Kitchen in New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia, and Seoul Art Space_Geumcheon in Seoul. Her writing has been published by Afterimage, Afterall Online, ArtAsiaPacific, Performa Magazine, Fillip, MOMUS, Pluto Press, and Ryerson University Press among others. In 2011–2012 Park was Helena Rubinstein Fellow in the Curatorial Program at the Whitney Museum’s Independent Study Program, and in 2013-2015 she was Whitney-Lauder Curatorial Fellow at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia. The topics of her curatorial research and writing include the politics of visibility, representation of violence, ghosts, and non-western art in the global context of contemporary art.

Tanya Lukin Linklater’s performance collaborations, videos, photographs and installations have been exhibited at EFA Project Space, NYC; Museum of Contemporary Art Santiago, Chilé; SBC Gallery, Montreal; Western Front, Vancouver; Urban Shaman, Winnipeg; Images Festival + Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, Toronto; grunt gallery, Vancouver; Nuit Blanche, Winnipeg; Museum of Contemporary Native Art, Santa Fe; Culver Center for the Arts, California; People of Good Will Project, Guelph; and elsewhere. She is compelled by the interstices of visual art and poetry, pedagogy, indigenous languages, portrayals of women and children in film, and the body. In 2016, she will present performances at Remai Modern, Saskatoon; Centre Phi + DHC / Art, Montreal; and the Belkin Gallery/UBC, Vancouver; and install new work at Art Gallery of Alberta in a two-person exhibition with Duane Linklater. Her poetry and essays have been published by C Magazine, Access Gallery, BlackFlash Magazine, Yellow Medicine Review, Taos International Journal of Poetry and Art, Drunken Boat, Ice Floe, Western Front Gallery, and McLaren Art Centre. Tanya studied at University of Alberta (M.Ed.) and Stanford University (A.B. Honours) where she received the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship and the Louis Sudler Prize for Creative and Performing Arts. She is currently a graduate student in Cultural Studies at Queen’s University. She was awarded the Chalmers Professional Development Grant in 2010 and the K.M. Hunter Artist Award in Literature in 2013. She originates from southern Alaska and is based in northern Ontario, Canada.

Postcommodity is an interdisciplinary arts collective comprised of Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martínez, Kade L. Twist and Nathan Young. Postcommodity’s art functions as a shared Indigenous lens and voice to engage the assaultive manifestations of the global market and its supporting institutions, public perceptions, beliefs, and individual actions that comprise the ever-expanding, multinational, multiracial and multiethnic colonizing force that is defining the 21st Century through ever increasing velocities and complex forms of violence. Postcommodity works to forge new metaphors capable of rationalizing our shared experiences within this increasingly challenging contemporary environment; promote a constructive discourse that challenges the social, political and economic processes that are destabilizing communities and geographies; and connect Indigenous narratives of cultural self-determination with the broader public sphere. Postcommodity are the recipients of grants from the Telluride Institute (2007), American Composers Forum (2008), Arizona Commission on the Arts (2009), Elly Kay Fund (2010), Joan Mitchell Foundation (2010), Creative Capital (2012), Art Matters (2013), and the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (2014). In 2011 the collective’s work was featured in Close Encounters, an international Indigenous exhibition exhibited in multiple venues throughout the city of Winnipeg; Contour, the 5th Biennial of the Moving Image in Mechelen, Belgium; Nuit Blanche, Toronto; Half Life: Patterns of Change, Santa Fe Art Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico; The Night is Filled With the Harmonics of Suburban Dreams, Lawrence Art Center, Lawrence, Kansas; Here, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Museum; 18th Biennale of Sydney in Sydney, Australia; Adelaide International in Adelaide, Australia; and Time Lapse, Site Santa Fe, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In 2013, Postcommodity exhibited their work at the Headlands Center for the Arts, and also opened their art space, Spirit Abuse, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In 2015, Postcommodity exhibited at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art and staged a site-specific 2-mile long land installation at the US/Mexican border near Douglas, Arizona.

Walter Scott is a Kahnawake-born, Montreal/Toronto based artist working in writing, illustration, performance and sculpture. His ongoing comic book series, Wendy, follows a young woman living in an urban centre whose dreams of contemporary art stardom are perpetually derailed. Recent exhibitions include Habitual Present, 8-11, Toronto; Pre-Existing Work, Macaulay and Co. Fine Art, Vancouver; and Stopping the Sun In Its Course at Francois Ghebaly, Los Angeles. In 2014 he was Artist-in-Residence at the Koganecho Bazaar in Yokohama.

cheyanne turions is an independent curator and writer who holds a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy from the University of British Columbia, and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in Visual Studies from the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design at the University of Toronto. From the farmlands of Treaty 8, she is of settler and Indigenous ancestry. Her work approaches the space of exhibition as alive: the gallery is a space of dialogue where artists, curators and publics can reflect on and experiment with ways of seeing and being in relation. Recently she curated Talking Back, Otherwise, a year-long exhibition at the Jackman Humanities Institute. Forthcoming writing projects include contributions to MAWA’s Desire/Change: Contemporary Canadian Feminist Art; Johanna Householder and Tanya Mars’s More Caught in the Act: An Anthology of Performance Art by Canadian Women; and Meryl McMaster’s Confluence. Her exhibition Other Electricities was presented the award for Innovation in a Collections-based Exhibition by the Ontario Association of Art Galleries in 2014. In 2015 she received the inaugural Reesa Greenberg Curatorial Studies Award and the Hnatyshyn Foundation’s Emerging Curator of Contemporary Canadian Art Award. She sits on the Board of Directors for Kunstverein Toronto, the Editorial Advisory Committee for C Magazine and the Advisory Board for the Art Museum at the University of Toronto. She is the director of No Reading After the Internet (Toronto).

SFU Galleries | Simon Fraser University

Wood Land School Critical Anthology

< Back

Or Gallery

555 Hamilton St.
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6B 2R1

T. +1 604.683.7395
E. or @ orgallery.org

Gallery hours 12 - 5PM
Tuesday - Saturday

Free Admission